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53

Modify /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf to add the following options: display-setup-script > calls your mycustomloginvideo.sh before the login screen appears session-setup-script > calls your mycustomdesktopvideo.sh before the user desktop session starts [SeatDefaults] greeter-session=unity-greeter user-session=ubuntu # for your login screen, e.g. LightDM (...


31

First generate a "modeline" by using cvt Syntax is: cvt width height refreshrate cvt 1680 1050 60 this gives you: # 1680x1050 59.95 Hz (CVT 1.76MA) hsync: 65.29 kHz; pclk: 146.25 MHz Modeline "1680x1050_60.00" 146.25 1680 1784 1960 2240 1050 1053 1059 1089 -hsync +vsync Now tell this to xrandr: sudo xrandr --newmode "1680x1050_60.00" 146.25 1680 ...


28

Native resolution for Samsung SyncMaster B2030 is 1600 * 600 60 Hz Generate the modeline using cvt: cvt 1600 900 60 which will be: # 1600x900 59.95 Hz (CVT 1.44M9) hsync: 55.99 kHz; pclk: 118.25 MHz Modeline "1600x900_60.00" 118.25 1600 1696 1856 2112 900 903 908 934 -hsync +vsync Get the name of the output to which your display is connected: ...


20

The trick is to use the newer --rotate instead of -o which needs to be used with a --output argument: xrandr --output "$internal" --rotate "$xrandr_rotation" Examples xrandr --output LVDS1 --rotate left xrandr --output LVDS1 --rotate right xrandr --output LVDS1 --rotate normal xrandr --output LVDS1 --rotate inverted


18

NOTE: I also posted this answer here I found a very simple workaround that works perfectly for me running 13.04. on a laptop with a 24" external screen that is not permanently connected. I'll just copy from here log in use xrandr or the Displays control utility to configure your monitors how you'd like them to be configured in the login screen ...


14

I think you can add the display modes to /etc/X11/xorg.conf. If you don't have a xorg.conf, then you can use the following as a basis. You need to replace the entries with the names Modeline, Driver and Modes with the correct entries for your system. Depending on your hardware, you may need additional entries, for example if your system has more than one ...


14

From man grep (emphasis mine): grep searches the named input FILEs (or standard input if no files are named, or if a single hyphen-minus (-) is given as file name) for lines containing a match to the given PATTERN. By default, grep prints the matching lines. And from the GNU docs (again, emphasis mine): 2.4 grep Programs grep searches the ...


12

The new version of gnome-settings-daemon stores its configuration information in dconf rather than gconf. To do the equivalent of what you were doing on 11.04, try the following: Install the dconf-tools package, and then run dconf-editor. In the tree on the left, navigate org -> gnome -> settings-daemon -> plugins -> xrandr. Uncheck the active checkbox.


10

I tried a similar thing and after some debugging I think I figured out what's going on. Your script probably is run and probably does set the resolution correctly. However, since it is run by the login manager, it runs before Unity has finished setting up your desktop environment and Unity reads its own settings and resets the resolution to what you had. So, ...


10

When you do: xrandr | grep " connected " you are basically redirecting the standard output (file descriptor 1, /dev/stdout) of xrandr to the standard input (file descriptor 0, /dev/stdin) of grep, this is the job of the pipe. As grep takes input from standard input when no file name is given, your command will succeed as far as the file is concerned. ...


8

I was trying to change the default resolution of LXDE on Ubuntu (LXDE is also used in Lubuntu) and I found a solution for this problem. I also have Lubuntu installed and I've checked that this file actually exists which it does (Ijust tried this fix as well and it worked). So, the fix.... Open up a terminal, press ctrl+alt+t I'm guessing you have a ...


8

I managed this little basic script below that answers my question. Now, whether the external monitor is connected or not, Lightdm uses the right resolutions at the greeter stage. Nevertheless, this same script needs to be modified to be generic, in a way that the user wouldn't need to specify manually resolutions of its laptop and monitor screens. (Parse ...


7

you can grep output of xdpyinfo or xwininfo -root or xprop -root.


7

alt+f2 gksu xkill you click on the window you want to close. Also you could try with terminal lets say banshee is stuck when you tried to listen an online radio station.. sudo ps -A|grep bans 10304 bla bla bla ^ the result of the command sudo kill 10304 you could try sudo kill -s kill 10304. a more easy way gksu gnome-system-monitor this is ...


7

Ok, just solved it. I typed in the terminal: xrandr --output VGA1 --mode 1280x1024 --rotate normal If you have the same kind of problem, you have to change "VGA1" with the right output (just type xrandr in the terminal to have a list of your your video outputs) and "1280x1024" with the resolution you want.


6

Issue xrandr on the console will show you the names of different outputs available on your system (LVDS, VGA-0, etc.) and resolutions available on each: If you see the desired resolutions available for the output that you want (tv screen), set it via xrandr --output <output> --mode <mode> (example: xrandr --output LVDS --mode 1360x768) If your ...


6

Some one posted another workaround, although I must say It didn't work for me. It could probably work for you. In my case it breaks unity and I can only move my mouse cursor around. The app indicator top panel looks empty, but after unplugging my LCD I was able to delete the added lines and everything went back to normal. edit the file /usr/sbin/lightdm-...


6

This is still an issue as of Ubuntu 12.10 released October 18, 2012. A bug fix for this seemed to be in the works so that at least there is an easier way to re-configure the key bindings, but it has since been marked invalid because this was supposedly fixed in gnome-settings-daemon. Ultimately this problem is supposedly due to some hardware vendors hard-...


6

Thanks to Geppetvs for his suggestion, but I have one that is up and running and working very well. I have a Sapphire HD6770 fleX Edition card. I believe any of the ATI "Eyefinity" cards would work. Most of them require a DisplayPort monitor to support 3 displays, or a DP->DVI adapter. The Sapphire fleX cards can work with 2xDVI + 1xHDMI (which can be ...


6

xrandr needs to know which display you're talking about, typically via the DISPLAY environment variable root (which udev runs as) has no default DISPLAY set; even if he/she did, su -c does not preserve the environment by default So pass it along explicitly to bash, and that should solve your problem, e.g.: su -c "DISPLAY=:0.0 bash -x /usr/bin/think-dock $...


6

Disclaimer: I do not know if it works for all graphic drivers. Intel driver here, in 13.04. First of all get the normal screen you have active: xrandr --current My output is: Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1024 x 600, maximum 32767 x 32767 LVDS1 connected 1024x600+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 220mm x 129mm 1024x600 60.0*...


5

I have been trying to solve a similar problem for a while now and found a solution that works for me so hopefully it will help... I have an old aspire one AOA110 that I have broken the screen on too many times and after buying a new laptop decided that I would try to turn it into a HTPC but the external display I have is not recognised by X so I have had to ...


5

.bashrc (as it name may suggest) is only executed on startup of a bash shell. You have to edit ~/.profile to apply changes to your graphical session. Note that this file is intended for setting environment variables and such. You'd better create a startup script to accomplish this task.


5

I had the problem of wanting an extended display on my new LXDE box, (not a dual clone), found the correct command, but couldn't make it permanent. xrandr --output VGA-0 --right-of DVI-0 The above methods all seemed too hard/not the right way to do it. I eventually found this: http://www.sudo-juice.com/change-lxde-screen-resolution-ubuntu-lubuntu/ That ...


5

I also encountered this problem (used to have a Dell 23" screen) First, determine which interface is connected to your display: $ xrandr -q The command output will be: mukolla@pk:~$ xrandr -q Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1920 x 1080, maximum 8192 x 8192 LVDS connected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 1366x768 60.0 + ...


5

59.79 is really 60. Sometimes refresh rates are off of 60 by a tiny bit, but it shouldn't matter. Any visual fatigue you're experiencing could be fixed by using a different desktop environment, such as GNOME, MATE, KDE, or LXDE. You could also try using a background with slightly dimmer colors. However, I feel that eye fatigue is somewhat subjective. If you ...


4

Let me answer my own question; the answer is bizarrely involved. The trick is that the desired desktop behavior (which held in 10.04) is now (in 11.04) controlled by Compiz, which has a notion of "outputs": that is, screens to draw on. These are configured in the CompizConfig Settings Manager (package compizconfig-backend-gconf or -kconfig), in the "...


4

I fixed it. The problem is that in order to use Xinerama, both displays must be using the same bit depth. (16 bits)


4

First type in xrandr in your terminal and see which is the connected device. It maybe VGA1 as it is in this case. If not then replace VGA1 by your connected device in the commands below. Then create a new document and name it eg:- "yourname.sh" Type in: xrandr --newmode "1600x900_60.00" 118.25 1600 1696 1856 2112 900 903 908 934 -hsync +vsync xrandr --...


4

I'm not sure if xdpyinfo uses RANDR: xdpyinfo | grep dimensions: This one assumes the root window's size is the resolution: xwininfo -root |egrep 'Width:|Height:'



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