New answers tagged

0

I resolved the issue of display brightness reset to the minimum after restarting. Remove all configurations made, number 1, 2, 4, and 5 and only apply instruction number 3. However, it sets to maximum brightness every restart and changing of brightness level doesn't work. It's okay for me now, instead of having a minimum display brightness every time.


0

Assuming you are on 15.04 Ubuntu Core, there is actually a mir snap in the store, you can install (sudo snappy install mir.mvp-demo) In addition to that, I posted sometime ago https://docs.google.com/document/d/14msTXe_cFulk9z4jFptEjFJzZx58b1mWU_r4VivLkfA which contains additional steps on how to create a Qt based snap. Looking forward, I've just recently ...


4

Uninstall the NVIDIA drivers and reinstall them in a different way. Step 1 : Uninstall the NVIDIA drivers Highlight the Ubuntu menu entry and press the E key. Add nouveau.modeset=0 to the end of the linux line. Press the F10 key to boot into the Ubuntu system. When the login screen appears press Ctrl+Alt+F1. Enter user name and password - execute : ...


3

You could follow the chain of targets from the point you stopped at and manually load the graphical target as if you didn't stop at the multi-user target at all: sudo systemctl start graphical.target That will handle everything correctly. But bear in mind that this will start LightDM, which will in turn start Unity upon login, and not Unity directly. ...


2

Seems like the package python-gtk2 was missing. I installed it: sudo apt-get install python-gtk2 That explains the difference in Python's sys.path (/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/gtk-2.0 was missing). But on the other machine where the entry was present, according to aptitude why, the package was only installed as dependency of ...


0

Try this solution. Use sudo apt-get install nvidia-331 nvidia-settings nvidia-prime and then reboot. You can use application named nvidia x server to configure the display. Unfortunately there is no application named nvidia x server Stefano


0

It appears you are using the noveau driver. I would suggest moving the xorg.conf out of the way, rebooting, and then configuring your desired display using the Display settings panel in System Settings. Once you've got your configuration working as desired, you can copy the ~/.config/monitors.xml file to /etc/gnome-settings-daemon/xrandr/monitors.xml to ...


1

No, you don't have to force it. Xorg server automatically loads it if it exists. You may think of it as a static override configuration. Keep in mind that Xorg will load dynamic setting then falls back to default if xorg.conf for missing item. man xrog.conf When the Xorg server is started by the “root” user, the config file search locations are as ...


1

No, there is no such recommended value for sync rates. There is no way that Xorg know them dynamically only from monitor DDC data. Otherwise, you have to get a common frequency for monitors you have. The fallback frequencies are: (man xorg.conf) HorizSync horizsync-range gives the range(s) of horizontal sync frequencies supported by the ...


0

For me (Host: Mac El-capitan, Guest: Ubuntu 14.xx LTS, VirtualBox: 5.0.12) the Ubuntu won't reboot (black or the default purple screen frozen) after guest installations via apt-get as described in most posts in this thread. Finally I used the official instructions from VirtualBox. On a fresh Ubuntu installation. Worked! Installing Guest Additions on ...


0

Here is what you need to do. If you use the Driver Manager/Additional Drivers (Jockey) Utility and select the available nvidia driver. You can install the nvidia drivers properly. Upon Reboot, you can use the Nvidia X Server configuration Utility(nvidia-settings) to Select. Either Performance Mode or Power saving Mode. In the power saving mode only Intel ...


1

Make sure you have installed all the required packages on the CentOS machine. You can do that simply by installing whole group for X system: yum groupinstall "X Window System"


0

Pls. dig into X11 Protokoll regards the expose events. While the X11 server can store content of the windows most of the applications will receive an expose event when a part (inkl. the whole) of the applications window becomes visible. Usually when there is no interference (such as screen saver, screen blanking) there is no need to redraw the content of ...


0

I had the exact same problem. ensuring the dvi cable was correctly fixed was the solution. Actually the nvidia driver seem to be checking the connection with the screen, so even so when the screen seems to display correctly and nouveau driver works, an incorrect connection can prevent the nvidia driver to work.


0

Try one of this: Press Ctrl+Alt+F7 to launch the GUI interface From the terminal change your desired resolution with: xrandr -s 1024x768 where 1024x768 is your desired resolution and reboot the system by: sudo reboot Waiting for your response.


0

This does not directly answer your question but is the much easier solution. The easiest solution here is to just cover up the IR receiver - the IR beams won't be able to penetrate tape or paper put over the IR sensor. That saves the headache of actually having to disable the sensor in system settings or by blacklisting drivers you may later want.


0

If fglrx is not installed, you are most liekly using the Xorg driver. You can verify this with modinfo radeon | grep author If it returns Gareth Hughes, Keith Whitwell, others. you are using the Xorg opensource driver. You have to try which works better, the Xorg driver or fglrx. Simply use the one you experience to work better. If fglrx really ...


0

never mind! i figured it out ^_^ i typed in sudo sh ~/Downloads/crouton -u and it updated and its now fixed


3

59.79 is really 60. Sometimes refresh rates are off of 60 by a tiny bit, but it shouldn't matter. Any visual fatigue you're experiencing could be fixed by using a different desktop environment, such as GNOME, MATE, KDE, or LXDE. You could also try using a background with slightly dimmer colors. However, I feel that eye fatigue is somewhat subjective. If you ...


1

Open Software & Updates app in Ubuntu and it allows to install NVIDIA driver from GUI.


0

I think you should look at it this way: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 <--position-- physical keys Option "ButtonMapping" "1 9 3 4 5 6 7 8 2" <--function-- logical keys The position that indicates the key id as reported by mouse (through driver). So it's up to the manufacturer how to order them, however most stick to common order. ...


0

The problem was, that there was only 1 X server running, so I only had to do sudo xinit & after that, vglrun started to work! EDIT: if anyone stumbles upon the same problem, this stackoverflow answer helped me a lot: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/34805794/virtualgl-and-turbovnc-extension-glx-missing-on-display-0-0


0

Error was in syntax: xinit /home/ashley/Launch_Scripts/XP64.sh -config /path/to/modified.xorg.conf Should be: xinit /home/ashley/Launch_Scripts/XP64.sh -- -config modified.xorg.conf Both xorg.conf and modified.xorg.conf are located in /etc/X11/


0

So far, I tried: sudo apt-get purge "fglrx.*" and the options were not greyed out anymore. I chose fglrx and it seems to work now.


0

Try with +Release "xte 'keydown Super_L' 'key S' 'keyup Super_L'" b:11 + Release That may help.


0

This is a real issue for a newbie like me, and i'm amazed that there isn't any thread about this topic in this website,i just wasted several hours of my life for this tiny configuration i don't know why they did it but by default sshd only listens on localhost for X11 traffic we have to explicitly tell ubuntu sshd daemon to accept any host by adding this ...


3

Install the latest stable NVIDIA drivers 352 which support GEFORCE 940M. Highlight the Ubuntu entry in the GRUB boot menu and press the E key. Add nouveau.modeset=0 to the end of the linux line - press F10 to boot. On login screen press Ctrl+Alt+F1 ... enter user name and password ... Execute these commands : sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install ...


0

I was having the same issue which seems like it was being caused by trying to set my monitor positioning using xrandr. Once I removed my startup script and renamed the .config file in my home directory so that a new one was created after logging back in, everything seems to be working like it should.


0

After fiddling around for some hours I got tired of searching which config was the problem (as the other user worked fine) and just backed up my old home directory by renaming it, creating a new one instead - reboot and done. A fresh start where I took from my old folder just the configurations I needed for some applications.


0

I solved this by typing in the full input. For some reason, this worked. I added the following line to my startup applications: xrandr --output DVI-I-2 --mode 1920x1080 --rate 144.00 Where you can see the output by just running xrandr and choosing your resolution plus desired hz. Remember 144.00, just 144 will not work.


0

If you are looking to update the x-org display drivers, why not look into installing the oibaf ppa (info at https://launchpad.net/~oibaf/+archive/ubuntu/graphics-drivers) or xorg edgers ppa (info at https://launchpad.net/~xorg-edgers/+archive/ubuntu/ppa). I know for sure the oibaf ppa doesn't work with the hardware enablement stack it is meant to work with ...


-3

The real reason is so admins can think of themselves as super smart by running stuff from the command line. There is no security risk of running a GUI on Ubuntu server.


0

If you use the -X option: -X Enables X11 forwarding. This can also be specified on a per-host basis in a configuration file. X11 forwarding should be enabled with caution. Users with the ability to bypass file permissions on the remote host (for the user's X authorization database) can access the local X11 display through the ...


0

Create a startup script that runs an xrandr command that sets your resolution. That way, every time you login RandR will set your preferred resolution for you automatically. Create a script with the following contents: #!/bin/sh xrandr --output monitor_name --mode 1920x1080 Save it with a .sh postfix. You can find out your monitor name with xrandr | ...



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