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Do not upgrade your Ubuntu release if you installed it with WUBI. WUBI is only mean for testing Ubuntu on your PC. If you wish to fully use Ubuntu and make future upgrades in the future then please make a real install, make a partition destined only for ubuntu. Repeat, do not atempt to upgrade your ubuntu release if you installed it with WUBI. WUBI is also ...


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The upgrade does run an update-grub but it does not replace the main bootloader and maintains that configuration and such, though my recommendation is that you actually use sudo do-release-upgrade as I've had problems with the gui crashing and leaving the update running but not completely.


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The upgrade won't touch Windows. However, it will need plenty of free space - upwards of 3GB. So if you have the free space, go on ahead.


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first fix the bootloader using the steps in below URL https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair


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You should run a boot-repair via a live CD/DVD or USB drive. That should fix up your GRUB bootloader so that you can choose between Ubuntu and Windows 7.


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When it comes to the error it is saying that 14.04, although an lts release, does not have unity2d as you are probably using on your current computer with 12.04, and would have to try and run a full unity3d environment with software acceleration instead of hardware. What are your computer's specs? Also to make it a primary installation you can download ...


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WUBI is incompatible with an EFI-mode boot, which is almost certainly what your computer uses if it came with Windows 8 or 8.1 pre-installed. I recommend you delete your WUBI installation and perform a standard EFI-mode installation. (See also the Ubuntu community wiki and my page on EFI-mode installations for more information.)


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Don't use unetbootin. I've seen many reports of similar problems when people try to use it. Instead, if you've got an existing Linux (or OS X) installation, use dd to copy the image to the USB drive, as in: sudo dd if=imagefile.iso of=/dev/sdc This example assumes that /dev/sdc is your USB flash drive; change that detail appropriately, along with the ...


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I got this problem solved after a few experiments. Disconnect your internet and then start wubi.exe and it will use the iso file in the same directory. It may be a good idea to reconnect internet when your computer restarts for proper installation of ubuntu. Thanks everybody.


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Just a very quick tip. If you can boot into grub, then during Grub, press "e", that will bring up the editor, locate to where it says ro and change it to rw. You have to do this everytime you boot. To make the change permanent, run gksu gedit /etc/grub.d/10_lupin after booting (replace gedit with your favourite editor, use sudo nano /etc/grub.d/10_lupin if ...


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For resolving the login issue you should be able to go into recovery mode and use "adduser " then "sudo adduser sudo" to create another account.


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Unfortunately wubi is no longer supported and the absolute most reliable way to install is by booting a livecd/usb that you have burned. On windows 8 based systems wubi has been proven to not work at all.


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I did a quick look in the manual for the laptop and F12 (confirmed to be working) should have been the right key according to instructions for booting from external media. You should probably check the manual yourself. UEFI firmware update There is the possibility that the UEFI firmware of the laptop does something else than what is expected according to ...


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You do not need Wubi to install Ubunrtu alongside Windows. Do the following. Boot Windows. Go to System Settings, find there Administration - Disk manager. This utility would allow you to shrink partitions. Shrink any and leave some free space (10Gb to boot) Reboot to Ubuntu disk and install Ubuntu to that free space. Upon next reboot you will be ...


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Thank you to Bodhi.Zazen for pointing this out: Windows installer for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS onwards Quote: Support for WUBI has NOT dropped; it is no longer the preferred method though since Windows 8 does not play nice but if you have Windows 7 or older (excluding Windows ME) all you need to do is copy the installer from the ISO and it will install.


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I found a way to use Wubi to install Xubuntu 12 and it runs faster. I haven't seen wubi for 14. So far, this seems ok.


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During Grub, press "e", that will bring up the editor, locate to where it says ro and change it to rw. You have to do this everytime you boot. To make the change permanent, run gksu gedit /etc/grub.d/10_lupin after booting (replace gedit with your favourite editor, use sudo nano /etc/grub.d/10_lupin if you are in the tty), locate the line which says linux ...


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From https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/247265 Steven, I've found a solution that works, that is, if you haven't tried to reinstall yet: If you can find your boot commands, find the line that says: linux /boot/vmlinuz-3.13.0-24-generic root=UUID=D014E45... etc... Change "ro rootflags= sync" to "rw rootflags=sync" That's ...


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Due to your system specs you listed: Pentium 4, 2.79 GHz, 1 GB RAM, I would highly recommend you install either Lubuntu (a personal favourite of mine) or Xubuntu instead of standard Ubuntu. Both variants are lighter on system resources than standard and thus should run better on your hardware.


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Simply running sudo do-release-upgrade -d from the terminal prompt will take care of it for you. Try to run it from the console on the computer you're upgrading, since if you do it via a terminal session from another system (via ssh or something similar) if the upgrade has issues, or your connection drops, recovering could be problematic. It worked for me, ...


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Wubi uses a virtual disk (c:\ubuntu\disks\root.disk), so it's not actually installed on NTFS in the original sense. The Wikipedia article on Wubi explains pretty well how it works. To answer your question, let me quote a few lines from the History section: A number of Linux distributions, including Red Hat Linux and Slackware's ZipSlack, provided a ...


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I think the first screenshot is what you get if you press the Super key, not the desktop. But it's been a while since I used Ubuntu Gnome.


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Maybe the GNOME Shell you installed isn't compatible with your current Ubuntu version, so it fallbacks to the classic mode. GNOME Shell 3.4 is officially supported by Ubuntu Precise. Although it's a bit old, it's guaranteed to be stable and usable. First of all, remove the PPA from Software Sources. Then, sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get ...


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That looks like GNOME Classic. You should choose GNOME when selecting the session at login: (screenshot from the tutorial) If you still get GNOME Classic, you can force GNOME Shell by running these commands in a terminal: gnome-shell --replace & disown This will replace the current WM, send GNOME Shell to the background and detach it from the ...


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You can resize partitions using gparted. That way, you don't have to reinstall Ubuntu. Open a terminal (CTRL + ALT + T) Install gparted using sudo apt-get install gparted Launch it via dash or by running sudo gparted Select the partition you want to resize and click the 'Resize' button. When you're done making changes, hit 'Apply'. If you have a ...


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It seems wubi bootloader file is missing or corrupted. You can restore wubi bootloader using this guide.


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While it is technically possible, I say this only in case someone challenges yot to bet 100$ on it. It is awkward, tedious and buggy process. Create a bootable stick or better, find that empty DVD. For someone curious, the steps are: create a new partition on the drive. use VirtualBox to create a virtual machine with real partition as disk and DVD ISO. ...



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