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0

Thats bad. try to find pheonix bios files with same version of bios that you have. on bios-mods site you can read how to flash. But if you afraid go to the service center.


1

I'm confused by your question. If you've lost your Ubuntu install after installing Windows... as per help.ubuntu.com. Insert your Ubuntu CD, reboot your computer and set it to boot from CD in the BIOS and boot into a live session. You can also use a LiveUSB if you have created one in the past. Install and run Boot-Repair Click "Recommended Repair". Now ...


0

I'm just wondering, why insist on creating the stick with the Mac, when it's probably just a couple of minutes to do it in W10? Or did it fail on the W10 machine too? If El Capitan refuses to give you access to the stick, a long shot is to install a VM and install Linux on the Mac and try from there. Edit: A friend of mine reported problems with an El ...


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First make absolutely sure that the USB key is not mounted (if it is, unmount it). Next you should use sudo diskutil list To see if the USB key shows up. If it does, then the "problem" is that it isn't formatted. This is not actually a problem, you can proceed to use it. If the USB key does not show up, there may be driver or hardware problems. In ...


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You can make two partitions on your disk (three if you want swap partition for ubuntu into a different partition than the OS's). You install windows on one partition and ubuntu on the other. I suggest this order because in my experience windows installs his bootloader without asking the user if he wants to, and this would overwrite grub installed by ubuntu. ...


2

Here's the VeryEasyWay™ to do this: download the CloneZilla Live CD, boot it follow the device to image manual to do the imaging. store the image of the CloneZilla Live CD together with the image you created in your cloud. (In case a future version of CloneZilla would not be able to restore it) Only to be super-safe: keep the CloneZilla CD and the HDD ...


0

Format your USB stick in FAT32 then open a terminal and type dd if=/path/to/file.iso of=/path/of/mounted/usb Substitute the strings after = signs with your real paths. That's really quicker than other method!


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Well, yes, you can. Look for the correct tool to do this, like unetbooting. For more information about, how to create a bootable USB you can look at this: How to create a bootable USB stick on OS X. And here: How do I create a bootable flash drive for installing Windows?, And here: How to create a Windows 10 installer USB drive from a Mac.


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Make sure you have a USB Stick with at least 2GB of free space. Download and install UNetbootin USB installer Download The ubuntu Desktop ISO of your choice Launch UNetbootin and allow the osascript to make changes Select the 'Diskimage' radio button and then click the '...' button Select the ubuntu ISO file you downloaded and click 'Open' Then select ...


0

I haven't used Windows in a while, but as far as I understand, the issue only pops up when you write to the NTFS partition (files written from linux disappear when booting into windows). It is possible for a ubuntu (or any other linux based) system to read and write on a NTFS partition as long as you have ntfs-3g package installed. You can however mount the ...


-1

It's not an unknown issue. There is a fix: http://www.webupd8.org/2014/09/dual-boot-fix-time-differences-between.html Worked for me ... the "issue" stems from the fact that Linux uses "UTC" [Grenwhich Mean Time or GMT, also referred to as Zulu] where as Windows uses your local time to set the system master time. Anyhow, hope the fix works for you too! ~J


1

Yes this is entirely possible with an image of an existing Windows OS to use as the virtual disk. It would also be possible with a Windows installation disk/iso file. For either type of installation, you'll require the product keys for the OS. The vboxmanage commands are going to be your friends in this endeavour, they're described here. You'll be running ...


0

The workaround I use is to install the Linux version of Steam. The store works there, you can buy the Windows games, then start the Wine-Steam and play them.


2

Why doesn't Ubuntu 16.04 have ubuntu.exe inside the iso? Wubi is no longer supported and was only meant to be used for testing, not for permanent use. At this time, Wubi does not work with the Windows 8 or Windows 10 default bootloader. Thus at this point Wubi would not work on a new Windows 8/10 machine. You would be able to install, but not reboot into ...


2

I believe this was the wubi method which is no longer recommended. This method has been "not recommended" for quite some time even though it has still been available. You should seriously consider posting a question about the failed install and provide specifics about the fail.


1

Have you tried CrossOver? It doesn't have IE 11 support though, but IE8 have 3 star which stated that this version have run with limited functionality.


3

As far as I know, Internet Explorer 11 does not work well under WINE, and you would be extremely lucky to get it working well. The only available entry for IE 11's WINE compatibility currently rates it as "Garbage": https://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=version&iId=33811 And as you can see on the Wine website, no version of Internet ...


5

I Would do this: Change to ROOT mode from a Live CD/USB Preferrably, if not it will still work from a dual-booted Linux install. Open a terminal and type: sudo -i Then, find out which partition is your Windows via this command: fdisk -l Mine shows this: /dev/sda1 * 2048 206847 204800 100M 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT /dev/sda2 206848 ...


0

Try out this method Boot up using a live CD. Open a terminal using Ctrl + Alt + T Type the following commands in order. sudo -s apt-add-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair apt-get update apt-get install boot-repair exit boot-repair When it asks to choose in which device you want to install grub, choose the internal hard drive(i.e. sda)


0

It is possible that if you power on your machine USB external hard drive has not spined right away, BIOS did not recognized it and it is skipped on starting your computer. On installation of Ubuntu you have rebooted computer and was not powered off. Same happened to external disc - it was not powered off. In that case you can on first power on computer and ...


0

[insert face palm here] When you installed it to the external hard drive a bunch of other stuff (boot files) were on the external drive. So now your boot is messed up. In order to fix this you need some kind of windows recovery drive where you can boot to a console. Then refer to this helpful thread for help on fixing the MBR: https://ubuntuforums.org/...


3

If you run the windows version of steam on wine, you also need to make sure all dependencies are available. For example: steam for windows uses a browser as backend for its store and community. Not sure if it is Internet Explorer, but give it a try please. And if that does not work, install firefox and/or google chrome for windows under the wine, as well. ...


0

You will probably find that the re-installation of windows has wiped GRUB, you will need to reinstall GRUB in order to boot into Ubuntu. There is a guide here showing how this can be achieved, your first port of call should probably be the section entitled Boot repair after a Windows Upgrade on Ubuntu 14.04 (non-RAID) If you want to back up your files or ...


0

I disagree with the claim that root is always necessary to make cifs connections go. It is true, it is always needed for CLI smbmount, but a file manager such as nautilus has ability to mount a cifs share and it is not necessary to be root. I don't use Gnome, but I still have Nautilus installed. Run this in a terminal to prevent having it try to take over ...


1

Press F5 to refresh or reload.


1

I experienced exactly the same issue when I installed the dkms driver from the Ubuntu repositories via apt-get. Simply reinstalling the Guest Additions using the VirtualBox Guest Additions CD solved it.


1

Is is not possible to load your different OS in your configuration. Either all UEFI or all LAGACY installed OS will be selectable in one way. You need to install Ubuntu in UEFI or install Windows in LEGACY. Please look for solutions for running Ubuntu in UEFI.


0

I looked into this myself and the problem seems to be a missing libnss_wins.so library, and I checked into how to ensure this exists on my machine and I found sudo apt-get install libnss-winbind and doing that fixed the problem immediately. More info: I checked into what was going on by capturing output from strace ping mywindowsmachine and the problem was ...


0

Yes, distributions running the KDE environment can do this... One can set positions for windows based on window class, name etc. It needs some practice though.


4

It was Canonical that made that arrangement, not the Ubuntu users on this site. I'm just a guy who uses Ubuntu; I have absolutely no connection to Canonical or this project, and I imagine most people on here are in a similar situation. However, Canonical developer Dustin Kirkland wrote the following on his blog post announcing the Ubuntu Bash shell on ...


2

No. Using a system restore point only affects files within Windows.


1

Yes, you can definitely do it: Download the .iso of the Linux distro you desire. Download the Universal USB installer. Use the universal USB installer to create a bootable media, preferably a pen drive Restart your PC and boot from the pendrive. You may need to go into the BIOS and change boot device preference. You will be guided through the installation ...


0

Hypotheses: 1) Boot order thing on BIOS. 2) You didn't produce a proper bootable image of win8. 3) You can also try unpowering your device, taking of the battery and holding power for about 3-5 minutes. Then trying again. Another option is on BIOS turning off Virtual Processing(KVM), and then turning on again, if wanted.


0

Verify that this is a problem with your hardware by trying find the Kingston drive with sysRescueCD. If it can find it, then try a different version of Ubuntu


0

You don't need to repair GRUB2. Your GRUB2 is fine, but it must be activated in UEFI. (Now that UEFI has replaced BIOS, GRUB2 can no longer install itself automatically. It must be activated. That is one part of what Microsoft calls "Secure Boot".) I recently installed Ubuntu 16.04 dual boot with Windows 10. After the Ubuntu install, Windows was still the ...


0

Probably this is only a spell-checking matter of Ubuntu or something has been overseen here : So I assume that grub2 is installed already but Ubuntu is performing in the wrong way the command update-grub instead of update-grub2 ?! Try to run in terminal simply this command when you have entered your password after this, it should work and then you can re-...


0

On older machine like this you would be better to use a lighter version of Ubuntu like Lubuntu or Kubuntu, these distributions will require less resources to run. I'm pretty sure your machine is a 32-bit machine so you would need a 32-bit ISO if it's a 64-bit then you would use a 64-bit ISO file to get things rolling Here's a quick guide if you need help ...


0

The easiest way to do it, is using a router. Or connect both pc using ethernet cable and activate internet connection sharing in windows 10.


1

You'd need to get both machines on the same local network (LAN). Once you have that, you can either define one as the default gateway of the other. Or you can just connect both machines to your LAN and use the central networking device as gateway for both. But to create a LAN, it probably won't be enough to just put a cable between them. You'd need some ...


1

Finally found the fix here: http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/windows-7-samba-errnomem.html Need to make two registry changes 1) HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\LanmanServer\Parameters, change "Size" from 1 to 3 2) HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Memory Management, change "LargeSystemCache" from 0 to 1 Made the changes, ...


0

Put Windows on sda and only install grub2 on sdb where you'll have Linux. Leave the 250GB data partition unsecured. Doesn't sound like a problem


0

In the Ubuntu file manager adress bar , type : smb://fileserver/share You will be asked for password


0

You can read ext2, ext3 and ext4 partitions from Windows using ext2explore: https://sourceforge.net/projects/ext2read/files/latest/download


1

The problem seems to have been that my admin had created an entry on the Domain Controller for this server. This apparently caused a conflict that caused Kerberos to encounter the following error when trying to join: kyle@Server21:~$ sudo net ads join -k Failed to join domain: failed to lookup DC info for domain 'COMPANYNAME.LOCAL' over rpc: An internal ...


2

To mount your share with Linux First of all, you can add the nofail option in your fstab line, so that the system does not complain if it does not find your network share. If that happens, you will have to manually mount after booting your windows machine, for example with a sudo mount -a. But there is another approach that I tend to advise in such cases : ...


2

I am also facing the same problem and every time I have to keep pressing F9 to get the boot loader option. But I can still tell you a method to access the Windows files. Just follow the following steps. Go to Control Panel. Click Power Options. Click Choose what the power buttons do. Click Change settings that are currently unavailable. Scroll down to ...


0

Disabling fast boot from power options in windows again allowed to access windows files from ubuntu. I booted into boot setting (F10) and then changed UEFI boot order using F5 and F6. First entry was some boot manager or something which had two entries windows loader or something and ubuntu, I switched their order.


1

First you can fix the boot problem , you must update the grub by typing: sudo update-grub and you will have the boot options again. Second for the mount error you simply start windows and then you "restart" it (so windows is fully shut down ) and on directly boot on Ubuntu when the grub shows up.


1

If you are still monitoring this thread, Lubuntu 16.04 will probably be your best bet with those specifications.


1

You can only boot one operating system at a time! If you boot only one operating system all the time, it will remain preloaded in RAM memory, thus booting faster. When you switch from one OS to the other, the RAM memory is erased and the other OS is loaded into RAM, thus longer boot time might occur (like in a first time boot, a.k.a. cold boot). The ...



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