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The problem is that you installed Ubuntu with legacy support. I know this, because the tool he used to create the USB specifically says that it will install an MBR. MBR doesn't work in EFI systems. So, more than likely you had to change an EFI/BIOS setting in order to get the USB to boot in the first place. This setting is usually called Legacy Boot or CSM ...


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You can use boot repair to fix your boot isses. Just burn the image to a cd/dvd or make a bootable usb thumbdrive, boot from it and click recommended repair.


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You can mount ntfs discs on startup, ntfs-config will help with that, then delete your desktop folder, make link (alt ) at home and name it desktop, same approach with document's. I advice you only make link to windows desktop on Linux desktop to avoid problems.


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You can set this with CompizConfig Settings Manager install cssm like this: Install CompizConfig Settings Manager Then open it up and go to setting "Window Management" ->Grid" under Image for selection You can set your shortcuts. Hope it helps!


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You can press & hold Super button to display keyboard shortcuts . Super is your windows WIN button .


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longene-1.0-rc2 has the instruction on how to build and install longene kernel module. After that, you can run Windows application on your Linux machine. But the kernel module can only be built on x86 machine, x64 is not supported yet.


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I accomplish a similar task using the tool wmctrl command wmctrl -l will list the current windows command `wmctrl -r -e 0,X,Y,W,H will move/resize the window Example: wmctrl -i -r `wmctrl -l | grep "A Window Title" | tail -1 | cut -f1 -d" "` -e 0,1421,300,498,320 I have my script with a bunch of lines like the one above running on startup but I guess ...


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I didn't understand what do you mean, but if you want to run windows as a guest in Ubuntu, you can use of a program which is virtualbox, you can install it from software center. I have tried that and it is very helpful for you. I am sorry if I can not help you more, but don't worry others will come. All the best


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It's a lot simpler to install Ubuntu as a virtual machine with the free Virtual Box. That's how I did it on Win 7. It's a mature product and works great but I don't think it's certified for Windows 8.


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Test fingerprint-gui Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: sudo -i add-apt-repository ppa:fingerprint/fingerprint-gui apt-get update apt-get install libbsapi policykit-1-fingerprint-gui fingerprint-gui apt-get clean reboot After reboot launch Fingerprint GUI and enrol your fingerprints. Try locking your screen, logging out and in, sudo in terminal ...


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What finally worked for me: "Net user" on win8.1 returns accounts, my user name (Dave), which is different than my windows 8.1 user name. (miracle of windows) Used "Dave" and my 8.1 password when Ubuntu asked and off we went. Since I asked Ubuntu to remember the login forever it wanted the keyring unlocked. That password I remembered. Life is good.


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sudo update-grub the above will do the trick mostly. If not working then do the manually thing by editing Grub menu gksudo gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst This entry automatically added by the Debian installer for a non-linux OS on /dev/sdb1 title Windows 7 root (hd1,0) savedefault makeactive map (hd0) (hd1) map (hd1) (hd0) chainloader +1 edit /etc/fstab ...


1

First off, I don't think this is an Ubuntu question but more of a windows question, however I shall give you a quick pointer - It is most certainly possible to do, but it does break the Microsoft terms of service and therefore is illegal. Because you will be dual booting, you will already have a copy of windows installed on the computer, adding a second copy ...


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While it's difficult to impossible to have a Unix user home on a NTFS file system, it's still possible for Ubuntu/Linux to read from and write to them. If you want the convenience of having the same directory structure on Linux and Windows you can automatically mount the NTFS file system on boot¹, and create symbolic links in your Linux home directory to ...


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Ext2Read works well. It can also open & read disk images ( eg: Wubi disk images) Ext2Read is an explorer like utility to explore ext2/ext3/ext4 files. It now supports LVM2 and EXT4 extents. It can be used to view and copy files and folders. It can recursively copy entire folders. It can also be used to view and copy disk and file However, ...


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Windows and Linux can both read/write to FAT32 file systems. However, FAT32 file systems have the limitation that any single file can only be approx 4 GB in size, as a maximum. Alternatively there are ways to read EXT file systems via windows. Be careful: I tried this way once and all I got was blue screens in windows.


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You can use the Other option, is not so hard. Go to Other, it will open gparted or a gparted-like program, add a new ext4 partition to the empty partition by pressing the + sign, and set the mount point of the new partition to / . Maybe it will warn you that you do not defined a swap space, but if you have 4GB memory, this is not necessary. (If you have less ...


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First open gparted (if it is not installed install it by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T and entering sudo apt-get install gparted in the upcoming terminal ) and check for any ntfs partition. If you do not see one, that you probably wiped out windows when installing ubuntu. Download a windows 8 image from somewhere ...


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I will try to summarize. Secureboot is normally turned off, for Ubuntu install. It has no purpose for Ubuntu, as it is a feature used by the junk that is Windows to prevent firmware from being altered by malware. 1). Make sure you run the "Recovery Backup Tool" present on all newer Windows systems. This will produce a set of DVD's which can rebuild the ...


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I wrote a Python script named QuickTile for this sort of thing and I run Lubuntu, so it's developed and tested primarily under a dual-monitor Openbox setup. Features: Aims to replicate WinSplit Revolution's keybindings (It's actually one of the earlier projects to do this given that it was already usable in 2009 when my git history begins) Can also be ...


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The problem here is with the method used to install GRUB. It has nothing to do with the current filesystem on thumbdrive as WinUSB formats it. To fix it you must edit the winusb script which is located probably in /usr/bin (I don't have it installed so I can't tell). Open it with any text editor with root permissions (e.g. gksu gedit /usr/bin/winusb). Now ...


-1

refer to : Installing Ubuntu on a Pre-Installed Windows 8 (64-bit) System (UEFI Supported) this may help you. I know my classmate has installed ubuntu 14.04 on his machine,which is uefi,by disable the secure boot and fast boot.


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Short answer: No, you can't. You need to install Ubuntu 12.04.2 or 12.10 in order to install using UEFI. Here you have 2 tutorials: http://www.howtogeek.com/175641/how-to-boot-and-install-linux-on-a-uefi-pc-with-secure-boot/ https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI Have a nice day!


0

Well nvm, I learned why my flash drive didn't work. I tried a different one, and it worked. Now I know why the SanDisk Cruzer 16GB was so cheap. I'll just use it to install my drivers.


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You can use WinUSB for that to install WinUSB on your Ubuntu follow these instruction. Okey, if you are from Ubuntu 13.10,13.04,12.10,12.04, then run this in terminal: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:colingille/freshlight sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install winusb and if you are from Ubuntu 14.04 then run this in terminal: sudo add-apt-repository ...


0

I've had the same thing happen I just manually partitioned it, it's really not that complicated if you follow steps listed here: How to use manual partitioning during installation?


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This may be helpful. Read This and see if it applies to you. http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/2014/05/install-ubuntu-1404-alongside-windows.html


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The error says that the windows Boot Configuration is missing. To repair the Boot Configuration Data (BCD), you need to use the bootrec.exe tool from Windows Recovery Environment. The Windows Recovery Environment can be loaded by booting from a Windows 7 disk. In case you don't have a disk, you can download one and use. Using it to recover your BCD doesn't ...


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Get the latest release of the boot-repair cd here and burn it to disk, boot off of it and then follow the instructions here. Recommended Repair will usually do the trick. I've rarely had to use the advanced options. Further information is available on this page.


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As a complementary answer in GameDev about porting a steam game to Linux, it could depend on many factors. Here are the comparison: We can see that on Linux is double the amount of memory. Apart from reasons mentioned in the link about compilers, libraries and more, from the Steam and Game developer perspective, they want to make sure that the game runs ...


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And if need be, it might useful to lay it thick and emphasize the importance of the 7th rule taken from Ubuntu's Basic Security page, already linked above by MadMike: 7. most important of all: use your common sense. The biggest security threat is generally found between keyboard and chair. to which I would add that this is the case for any OS, and in ...


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In Ubuntu, you could use the following command in your terminal(Ctrl+Alt+t) to locate these. df -h for file system mount points: phlin@ubuntu:~$ df -h<br> Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on<br> /dev/sda1 451G 270G 159G 63% / udev 3.9G 4.0K 3.9G 1% /dev tmpfs 786M 948K 785M 1% /run none ...


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Yes, any Software and any OS can be compromised. Ubuntu is no exception. This is the data which Ubuntu will collect. You might want to disable the online search. As for protecting Ubuntu from threats, the following post covers the Ubuntu security aspect pretty good, so I'm linking it here: Security and Ubuntu


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Yes, Ubuntu can be compromised, as any other OS, trojans, phishing, social engineering, password cracking, browser exploits - all work in Ubuntu. There is no policy of collecting the same amount of data as Windows 10 does (apparently, for developing purposes, which doesn't make it compromised in any way), and yet, there are Amazon adds in the dash - the ...


1

Ubuntu can do this! (This is Ask Ubuntu, after all.) For a really lightweight version of Ubuntu, you can check out Ubuntu Core which may need some configuration. For something that runs command-line only out of the box, but isn't as lightweight, you can try Ubuntu Server.


3

Ubuntu is based on Debian and Debian can run fully on the terminal. Just choose not to install X11 and you will get a command-line only version of Linux. For a lengthy list of linux distributions specifically designed to be low-memory, see here. BasicLinux is particularly small: it can run on as little as 3MB of RAM and is so small that it can fit in 2.8 ...


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I think what you're looking for is Tiny Core Linux it's a small Linux distro that can run in as little as 10 MB of RAM, it's also pretty customizable, check out the Intro page for more information. you would want to download the Core ISO or CorePlus since you say you're new to Linux. Download are available from here


1

It seems you have mixed BIOS and UEFI booting. Windows seems to be installed in UEFI mode (only 64-bit Windows can be installed in UEFI mode) Disk is in GPT style (has EFI system partition + MS Reserved) Linux is installed using MBR booting (disk has special BIOS/MBR booting partition) =============================== Easiest solution: delete BIOS boot ...


0

Sorry to hear Ubuntu didn't work out for you. Ubuntu is able to install apps, and it's actually easier once you get the hang of how it's different to Windows. If you're determined to return to Windows though you'll want to repair your boot loader. To do this you'll need to install boot-repair. After running "recommended repair" and rebooting you will be ...


0

A Temporary solution I usually rely on is "Super Grub2 Disk" Download the first "Recommended download". Burn the ISO on a CD (I think Brasero Disc Burner comes default with Ubuntu). Boot the PC off it (Like you did with Ubuntu CD during the installation). Choose "Everything", then choose your windows installation. If this works, and the windows is OK, ...


0

Normally when I see 2 Windows entries in GRUB it is because of the system partition Windows 7 installation creates apart from the actual partition (C: Drive) you would use. The system partition is normally around 100 MB. When GRUB reads that it sees that the filesystem is Windows 7. When it continues reading partitions it sees your C: which is also Windows ...


0

The only issue that I can see is that NTFS support in Ubuntu is a little slow. Reading and writing to these partitions might be slow, but this may depend on your hardware. You should test the speed on your system to see if it's fast enough for you - compare it with the native ext4 partition of Ubuntu.


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I see you have practically tried everything. I recommend starting with a fresh copy of the smb.conf file. It should look something like this: [global] workgroup = XTREME server string = %h server (Samba, Ubuntu) dns proxy = no force user = cyrex log file = /var/log/samba/log.%m max log size = 1000 syslog = 0 panic action = ...


0

You need only identify which partition it is on and mount it in the location of your choice. We can use parted to identify the partition like so: mgodby@mgodby-UDesk1:~$ sudo parted -l Model: ATA ST1000LM014-1EJ1 (scsi) Disk /dev/sda: 1000GB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/4096B Partition Table: gpt Number Start End Size File system ...


0

It's certainly not impossible, others report having the microphone working in their windows guest. Before starting the vm, enable audio in the vm's audio settings. In the windows guest, install the virtualbox guest additions to get the soundcard driver. Alternatively you can install it directly If it doesn't work, try the workaround in this question: ...


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How inaccessible do you want them to be? Linux has FAT and NTFS drivers and there are ext2/3/4 drivers for Windows. Anybody with administrative privileges or physical access will always be able to gain unrestricted access to the data of each file system unless it's encrypted. If you're afraid that the two operating systems will somehow intermingle: they ...


1

Install VirtualBox then connect your iso file with a virtualbox cdrom. Your install of ubuntu is untouched and windows works with virtualbox drivers well integrated into the ubuntu desktop. plus, you can make snapshots of your windows install and recover after the next virus/trojan attack.


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Just start installing Ubuntu. In installation type choose the last option called something else. You can now delete all your partitions and set new ones. All your data will be lost!


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Basically, so long as you don't need a completely secure erase, you just boot a livecd and open gparted then create a new partition table, also this is a bit off topic here


0

Sluggish(your opinion) . I use debian and have used ubuntu, i don't find it that sluggish. To answer your question. Easybcd is tool that you can use, it's freeware. Caution: Use it properly, you might end up corrupting your system. Go to your windows, download and install the tool and you can remove GRUB as default bootloader to windows ...



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