New answers tagged

1

If you are still monitoring this thread, Lubuntu 16.04 will probably be your best bet with those specifications.


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You can only boot one operating system at a time! If you boot only one operating system all the time, it will remain preloaded in RAM memory, thus booting faster. When you switch from one OS to the other, the RAM memory is erased and the other OS is loaded into RAM, thus longer boot time might occur (like in a first time boot, a.k.a. cold boot). The ...


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No, you should not experience a decrease in performance The only thing that is negatively-impacted by running a dual-boot is your drive space. While this may have other side effects that may cause a decrease in performance, it is not necessarily caused by a dual-boot specific performance decrease. Disregarding drive space, you will not be experiencing any ...


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As long as Ubuntu is running on dual-boot, as opposed to in a virtual machine, the only system resource Windows will take up when you're in Ubuntu is hard disk space. As long as you have enough space available for the Ubuntu OS (20 GB is adequate, 30 GB is better), swap (2x RAM) and /home (as big as you'll need for your storage and tarball installs), it ...


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Those packages are available in the repositories, though in newer versions sudo apt install libgnutls-dev libgnutls-dev:i386 Will install the packages you need.


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This happens on internal drives too. The way to fix this on internal would be to completely shutdown Windows holding the shift button while clicking shutdown. Please make sure you ejected the drive before you shutdown Windows. Another solution, would be to unmount and reformat the drive to ext4 using gparted. This would erase all data on the drive (if any) ...


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I've found the answer. If it could come in handy to someone - the thing was to create EFI partition on the drive where the Windows was installed. It looks like after installing dual boot Ubuntu it moved that partition to the partition where GRUB and Ubuntu were installed and I had to bring it back home. It can pretty easily be done with diskpart utility, ...


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I’m not 100% certain about this but have you checked the BIOS to see if it will even try to boot from the existing SSD? I had a similar problem and had to change the boot order in the BIOS to convince the machine to start there and not even try the other boot options.


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I think you are missing the keytab. You can create it via kadmin tool. type kadmin and in the prompt type help to see how to add the keytab.


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After doing some research this issue appears to be fixed in samba version 4.3.9. sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade Possibly sudo apt-get dist-upgrade This should resolve your issue and allow you to click anonymous and remember forever choice. If at 4.3.9, follow the guide on this website to mount Windows shares permanently. https://wiki....


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Aside from the usual, "You need to put a password on your fileshares" response I will offer the following reply. More to the point, however, more modern versions of windows are starting to enforce the need for having a password. This is a good thing. Following may be a post that has your answer. http://serverfault.com/questions/630631/how-to-make-samba-...


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Gloobus preview does that and webupd8 has 2 articles on that (2nd link also has a video). From the 1st link: Install the PPA ... sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8 sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install gloobus-preview And a previewer: Nautilus: sudo apt-get install gloobus-sushi nautilus -q Nemo: sudo apt-get install nemo-gloobus-...


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I know it's a late revival, but hopefully you or someone else could find the answer you're looking for in this post. Guaranteed there are several more like it, too! You could boot up Windows and resize the data partition (which likely has a drive letter, like C:/) from there using disk management which, if memory serves, is done like this: Open up **...


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Install WMP10 in a separate 32-bit prefix: cd ~/ && wget -q https://github.com/Winetricks/winetricks/raw/master/src/winetricks -O /home/$USER/winetricks && WINEPREFIX="/home/$USER/.wine32" WINEARCH=win32 wineboot && sh ~/winetricks -q wmp10


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1.Boot the system with the ubuntu LiveCD. 2.open the Terminal and type sudo fdisk -l it will list number of partition look which Device contain partition of the type 'Linux' 3.Copy the Device name containing the partition For example after typing sudo fdisk -l It may list some device list like /dev/sda1/, /dev/sda2/,...


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http://www.howtogeek.com/114884/how-to-repair-grub2-when-ubuntu-wont-boot/ This website will walk you through the steps I used to fix this exact problem with the bootloader.


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You can change their standard location by changing the file ~/.config/user-dirs.dirs which usually looks something like this: # This file is written by xdg-user-dirs-update # If you want to change or add directories, just edit the line you're # interested in. All local changes will be retained on the next run # Format is XDG_xxx_DIR="$HOME/yyy", where yyy ...


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It's none of them. Windows can not read the filesystem on your Ubuntu partitions and doesn't mount them. If you look at whatever the windows partitioning tool is, you will see your Ubuntu partition as a partition of an unknown type.


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To format your drive you want to boot up yur system using either a Ubuntu live cd/pendrive or a Gparted live cd/pendrive You can get the Gparted iso file from here: http://gparted.org/liveusb.php#linux-method-c Use Unetbootin to create a pendrive to boot up from. You can install Unetbootin with the following command: sudo apt-get install unetbootin ...


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Try to make a bootable CD or pendrive of Ubuntu and then choose Try Ubuntu option. That is try to run live ubuntu and then using GParted (Which is in-built) try to format the partition in which your other OS is.


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You may have uninstalled the windows boot loader when you converted the grub partition to blank space. You may have to reinstall windows.


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Yes, this is indeed possible. Ubuntu can read / write files stored on a Windows NTFS partition out of the box, nothing further required. However, if you want to read / write files stored on an Ubuntu Ext4 partition from Windows, you'll need to install a driver or utility to do so - there's various options described in this question on SuperUser. So you ...


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Ok I followed http://askubuntu.com/a/240831/440238 and deleted the Ubuntu boot stuff from Win10's efi partition. The Ubuntu uefi entries are now gone and Windows boots like normal I've had problems with Ubuntu before where it installs boot files to other HDDs when you specifically tell the installer not to, it really should be fixed.


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It sounds like GRUB is broken. Try booting into the live CD again, open a terminal and type sudo update-grub. This should fix GRUB. Then the Ubuntu boot option in UEFI should go to GRUB which should let you choose between Ubuntu and Windows. I don't think that removing all traces of GRUB from your hard drive will solve your problems, unless you don't want ...


3

VirtualBox commands for Ubuntu are actually very similar to those from Windows or the Mac OS. The good news is the vboxmanage command is installed into the path on Ubuntu systems so there is no need to go to specific folders to find it. The commands would then be as follows from a terminal: Press Ctrl+Alt+T to open a terminal. And these commands can be ...


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I made one of my usb drives windows install disk (with windows media creation tool), booted up, installed, BUT i didn't install it on top of my windows, ubuntu and remix os, i deleted ALL partitions and let the windows roll. Later i reinistalled ubuntu, but left the remix os business.


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I'm unable to find anything about running windows in an LXC container. However, there is a windows client for managing LXD, which might be what you're seeing? The goal of LXC is to create an environment as close as possible to a standard Linux installation but without the need for a separate kernel. For this reason, I don't think you're going to ...


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Thanks, ive tried that but no go. Here is the latest thing ive tried.... In bios i disabled launch csm, wanted to do everything with pure uefi. Put in win10 dvd which is booted and install is done successfully on one half of my ssd. Made a ubuntu usb in rufus with the option gpt for uefi. Usb is then recognized and booted successfully, but after selecting ...


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HTTP server Find your IP on the source computer, e.g. 192.168.0.10. On Ubuntu: ifconfig Create a server in a directory that contains the file you want to transfer: python -m SimpleHTTPServer 8080 On the receiving computer, open a browser, and visit: 192.168.0.10:8080 Now you can navigate through directories to the file you want. I'm not sure if ...


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I found a 90% fix for this problem at https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/systemd/+bug/1325142 The following has fixed most(90-95%) of my problems. (N.B.1) sudo dpkg-divert --local --add /etc/init.d/systemd-logind (N.B.2) sudo ln -s /bin/true /etc/init.d/systemd-logind (This now works) sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get -f ...


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You can also go the other way and set the share on our Linux machine, you can follow these instructions on how to do that. help.ubuntu.com - How to create a network share Procedures All commands must be done as root (precede each command with 'sudo' or use 'sudo su'). Install Samba sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install samba Set a password ...


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Share the files from your windows computer by right clicking on the folder that contains them, and picking "Sharing". Give it some basic level of access. Press Windows Key+R and type cmd, then click ok. type ipconfig and get the IP address of your wireless adapter. From your Ubuntu machine, open a new file window and click (from the menu bar) GO --> Enter ...


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I remember having a similar problem when trying to set up dual booting. Pendrive configures the install onto the flash drive in such a way that UEFI booting doesn't seem to work. Using another tool, such as rufus, should do the trick.


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You are sure that when you have created the bootable usb drive you have selected UEFI option? If not you can use Rufus (that unfortunately works only on Windows) to create your bootable usb drive with Ubuntu 16.04 iso and specify that it is a UEFI bootable drive and not the old BIOS bootable drive. This is the link for download rufus Link and this is a brief ...


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On my system I use F2 for UEFI, F8 for Boot Options and F10 for recovery. Yours likely has a boot option, too. What this does, is when I boot using F8, it pulls up my Win Boot Loader, Ubuntu USB and Ubuntu Boot-loader partition. After installing 16.04 (and until I get this grub2 fixed) I have to boot with F8 and choose Windows or Ubuntu respectively to boot ...


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Downgrade of samba to previous version worked as a workaround, not the real solution: apt-get install samba=2:3.6.3-2ubuntu2 samba-common=2:3.6.3-2ubuntu2 libwbclient0=2:3.6.3-2ubuntu2 winbind=2:3.6.3-2ubuntu2 libpam-winbind=2:3.6.3-2ubuntu2 smbclient=2:3.6.3-2ubuntu2 apt-mark hold samba smbclient samba-common winbind libwclient0 libpam-winbind


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This is hardly a complete answer, but it may help. I have a development machine here with Windows 7 and Kubuntu; I used a 128 GB SSD for Windows (the whole thing) and have Kubuntu dominant on my other three hard drives, with a limited partition made for media files in Windows. Any time I do have to reinstall Windows, I simply pull out the SATA cables from ...


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Well, how i solved my problem: I downloaded the Windows iso file. Made one of my USB sticks Bootable (with Windows iso) Booted up, selected language, then i pressed repair this pc Then from there i booted up to windows, where i could change the windows boot manager order (from ubuntu default 0 timeout to ubuntu default, 6 sec timeout) Disabled GRUB (...


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Disable Fast startup and hibernation in Windows - so boot into Windows - open command prompt as administrator and execute : powercfg /h off. Open Windows Control Panel, go to the Power Settings and uncheck Fast startup. Shutdown the PC completely - do NOT reboot. Boot into BIOS and select the Ubuntu installation USB drive you created marked with UEFI in ...


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At boot, open your boot menu (usually f2 or escape), and select "cd-rom device" or something like that. Good luck, I hope this helps you.


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I am guessing that you can log into Ubuntu, so grub must be working fine. Windows won't load, so there must be something wrong with your Windows bootloader. You need to fix it to regain access to Windows. Use a Windows disc or live usb drive to initiate windows start-up repair. Remember that you should use the same one that is already installed on your ...


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Normally, it wouldn't. Third party software just have the tech to relocate files marked unmovable in Disk Management.


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Try changing UEFI loader to the other one available. This fixed my problem.



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