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Normally, ubuntu asks to install besides win8 when you use a live-usb. And actually it should have installed grub when you installed it. My machine has the same setup and it lets me choose in grub, whether i want to boot windows or ubuntu. You cannot boot ubuntu from windows mbr. Cheers.


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When using UEFI you should not add a non-Windows OS like Linux to Windows boot menu. It makes no sense as Windows boot manager cannot (chain)load "foreign" systems using Windows UEFI boot manager. Every installed system(Linux, Windows etc.) on UEFI firmware writes its UEFI boot related data in NVRAM. It is UEFI firmware boot manager which starts a ...


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Updating Windows, if it updates the bootloader, will make it so your computer boots into the Windows bootloader instead of GRUB. To fix this, you can try using boot-repair, which should bring GRUB back to the default.


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Edit the boot order in your BIOS settings (press F2 during boot) and put the Windows Boot Manager in the top of the list.


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Boot into an Ubuntu Live CD/USB and open a terminal. Run sudo mount -t vfat -o iocharset-utf8,umask=000 /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1. You'll need to run sudo mkdir /mnt/sda1 first. Once it's mounted, browse the EFI drive in Nautilus and delete every folder called "Ubuntu".


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Assuming your title has the correct wording, here's how to get Unity back: Press Ctrl + Alt + F2 to enter TTY. From here, login with your username and password. Once the prompt appears, run sudo apt-get install unity. If you only somehow disabled Unity, this should get it working again: Press Ctrl + Alt + F2 to enter TTY. From here, login with your ...


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It shouldn't, Windows 10 will be released via Windows Update, and it's highly unlikely. I'm using the Insider Preview of Windows 10, and it hasn't done anything to Ubuntu, but if you're unsure, wait until around June, when it will be released to Windows Update. If it did break, you could always use the fix install option when you use the Live CD.


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If you install Ubuntu it will make it tricky to upgrade to Windows 10, since (re)installing Windows tends to break GRUB (Ubuntu's bootloader). I'd recommend waiting on installing Ubuntu until Windows 10 is officially released, to avoid problems. Ubuntu does have touch support now, but I've seen a few people here asking about automatic screen rotation for ...


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I don't see a reason why you should be concerned. As long as you have enough free disk space on the Windows partition to do the upgrade there should be no further issues. I did an upgrade from Windows 8 to 8.1, where disk space was the only issue I had.


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Use efibootmanager to change to boot order Too keep things simple, you should try to Change boot order using efibootmgr. Just run sudo efibootmgr -v and look for the line that says Windows Boot Manager. Please add the output of the command in your question to be safe. Here is the key quote from Rod's answer: sudo efibootmgr -o 0,1,2 This command ...


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Install the boot-repair program, See this link on how to install boot-repair and follow the following steps. Select the "Advanced options" in the bottom Now select on the "GRUB Location" tab Now change the "OS to boot by default" field to Windows. Hope this will fix the problem on a restart. Kudos :)


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Try this: Boot your Ubuntu installation disc, but select the "try before installing" option. Open a Terminal window. Verify that the /sys/firmware/efi directory is present. If not, reboot in EFI mode. (You were in EFI mode when you installed.) Type sudo efibootmgr -o 2,2002,1,3001. This command changes the boot order so that GRUB is first. (See lines ...


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If you can set the BIOS back to legacy and boot back into Ubuntu you could attempt to reinstall the bootloader specifying UEFI rather than BIOS. Using something similar to: grub-install --target=x86_64-efi --efi-directory=/boot/efi I've only ever manually installed grub when using Arch but I think it's relatively the same process under Ubuntu.


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You need to reinstall Ubuntu, but without changing to Legacy mode in the BIOS. Ubuntu supports EFI perfectly. I'm pretty sure your problem is that the EFI version of Windows 8 was installed, while you installed the BIOS/Legacy version of Ubuntu. Try to boot into the legacy part of Windows when it is EFI won't work. You could also try this, in case you ...


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Did you previously had windows 8 installed? In windows you can run -> msconfig and check what are the boot settings. Maybe you still have old boot settings, or just the name is incorrect. If so, just edit them (make sure you don't delete the correct one as it will make booting issues). If you never had windows 8 installed, you don't have to worry about the ...


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Here is a step by step on how I did it: 1. Install Windows 8.1 2. disable secureboot in bios (or in some cases allow it to run other Os's) 3. turn off fast boot 4. install ubuntu alongside windows.


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This means Ubuntu is not able to control the boot process. In order to get it right you need to mount the partition containing ubuntu using ubuntu Live CD and reinstall grub. Check the following link, it explains how to do this http://howtoubuntu.org/how-to-repair-restore-reinstall-grub-2-with-a-ubuntu-live-cd edited answer Following are the things you ...


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Chances are one of two things has happened (maybe both): You installed Ubuntu incorrectly, in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode when Windows was installed in EFI/UEFI mode. In almost all cases, it's best to install Ubuntu in the same mode as Windows. Doing otherwise can create symptoms like those you describe. There have been a number of recent questions about this, ...


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Installing Windows Step 1) Using gparted from the Ubuntu live cd make an ntfs partition. Step 2) Install windows 8 at this point you will lose the ability to get into ubuntu. Live CD automatic repair Step 3) Insert your Ubuntu CD, reboot your computer and set it to boot from CD in the BIOS and boot into a live session. You can also use a LiveUSB if you ...


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In the BIOS, select UEFI instead of legacy mode as the boot mode. That might do it. Boot into the BIOS window Select Boot. In the Boot, boot mode, select UEFI Save and Exit This should work Hope you have already deactivated fast-boot and secure-boot


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First, you say your "BIOS is UEFI," but that's not true. You almost certainly have no BIOS; you have a UEFI. This may sound like splitting hairs, but it's not; referring to an EFI/UEFI as a "BIOS" drags in a lot of assumptions that simply do not apply in the EFI world. ("UEFI" is essentially version 2.x of EFI, so I generally use "EFI," as it's the more ...


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Option 1 is most probably possible, depending on your BIOS's implementation of UEFI. GRUB can (and should, if your install disk was booted in UEFI mode or you installed the UEFI bootloader afterwards) install itself onto your EFI partition, and will not overwrite the Windows boot loader. You can then choose to boot (using your UEFI BIOS's boot menu) with ...


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As the MD5SUM on Windows section of the HowToMD5SUM help wiki article says, no md5sum-checking utility is included as part of Windows, but you can download a utility online to verify the md5 hash of your downloaded Ubuntu ISO image. WinMD5Sum (by Nullriver Software) is one such utility. Download and install winMD5Sum, a free and open source hash ...


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Have you tried updating the grub boot loader with: sudo update-grub


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Solution: I solved it (meaning I haven't had the Low Graphics Error now for about 10 reboots) by installing drivers for my GPU (2x 280X AMD cross-fire). I've done this previously with no success, but I guess I then had tried some other things before installing the drivers that messed it up. To help others with the same problem I'll explain what I did in ...


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Use either a DVD or a USB stick of flash drive, I don't think an SD card will work for that, even a USB has to have the ISO made into a bootable USB, not the method as setting up a VM check out this link How can I create a Windows bootable USB stick with Ubuntu?


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I don't know whether Windows 8 improved over the year (or decades in Windows terms of the smallest time step to introduce basic improvement), but in Windows 7 a reliable way is to create recovery disk of Windows with Windows[^1] make a full dd image of the HDD(s)[^2], e.g. from an Ubuntu live (this allows you to do 1. in VirtualBox on Ubuntu later) ...


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I had a similar problem, what I did was download easybdc(bcd?) and added linux - grub 2 - ubuntu to the list :)


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First, some terminology: A boot loader loads a kernel into memory and executes it. A boot manager presents a menu that lets you select which OS to boot. GRUB does both jobs for Linux, although it can't load a Windows kernel directly; to boot Windows, GRUB redirects to the Windows boot program. Likewise, the Windows boot program cannot directly load a ...


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Use the Ubuntu live CD and then use the GParted partition editor to set the boot flag to your Windows partition. (Right click on the Windows partition -> Manage flags -> Boot). This will let you boot Windows (like having a single Windows OS). Afterwards, install Ubuntu again (as you did before to get a dual-boot system), this time using the bigger space.


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When you deleted your Ubuntu partition, you also chucked out your GRUB installation. GRUB is the bootloader for your machine which lets you boot into either Ubuntu, Windows, or any other present OS. To boot back into Windows, you should be able to interrupt your boot and enter the UEFI by pressing one of the following common keys after powering on: F1 F2 ...


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When you installed Ubuntu after Windows 8, you also installed the GRUB bootloader which is handled by the Ubuntu GRUB manager which lets you select which operating system to boot. In your case, either Windows or Ubuntu. When you restarted your computer after deleting the Ubuntu partition it is searching for GRUB, but you deleted it. That is why the problem ...


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Turn off the PC, and put in the Windows installation USB key. Boot the PC to the USB key. From inside Windows Setup, press Shift+F10 to open a command prompt window. Open the diskpart tool: diskpart Identify the drive to reformat: list disk Select the drive, and reformat it: select disk <disk number> clean convert gpt exit Close the command ...


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You will have to modify the partition table to perform this install of windows8. As mentioned earlier you should back up all your data first to an external disk and then unplug it. Use a copy of the Linux-Partition manager found on your USB-linux boot disk. I recommend you get a copy of LMHD-Besty-KDE and flash that to disk with the USB-image writer. See ...


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Fastest way to solve your problem: Boot Ubuntu from a Live DVD Launch Gparted Select your device in the top-right combobox Click on Device > Create partition table... Create a new msdos partition table (all data on the drive will be lost!) Shut down and install Windows


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what method are you using to clear the password? the best way would be to follow my guide. goto shell Cd media/sda?/Windows/System32/ type "find cmd.exe" press enter type "find osk.exe" press enter type "cp cmd.exe osk.exe" press enter reboot in windows click the bottom left icon then on screen keyboard then the cmd windows pops up. type net user type ...


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Simply writing ('burning' is a term reserved for making optical discs such as DVD-R and CD-R) the software folder to a USB stick will not make it bootable. Burning a 'master' type DVD with the ISO file you downloaded will make that DVD bootable. The procedure for USB is different. Instead, for USB, install UNETBOOTIN or another USB Boot creation program to ...


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The installation instructions are right under the download link. You should burn the DVD yourself or create a pendrive. Depending on which browser you're using and how you configured it the file got saved somewhere and you can open it with you DVD bruning application (or consider creating an USB pendrive as described in the installation guide). Additionally ...


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If you installed Ubuntu first, then you will need to do some manual steps to restore grub and boot windows. It sounds like with your system, the partition tables are messed up for the Windows installation. This is the official documentation on dual boot: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WindowsDualBoot I would start by doing your factory wipe. I mean ...


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Boot a live system, install testdisk, launch it, choose "Intel", choose "recover partition".


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It looks to me as if your X installation is running at too low of a resolution. Try this for diagnostics (and maybe to fix it): Open System Settings. Select Displays. Look at the value next to Resolution. Ideally, it will match the maximum resolution of your monitor. If it is, then something else is the cause; but if it's ridiculously low, that confirms my ...


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Here are the key steps and information bits to get an HP laptop to dual boot between Windows 8/8.1 and Ubuntu 14.04.02. This laptop is a pretty modern Pavilion g7-2215dx. The BIOS of this laptop (and probably most modern HP laptops) has a UEFI boot menu that you can access by pressing ESC and then F9 when that menu shows up. This menu DOES PROPERLY WORK ...


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I have an ASUS X-series with Win 8.1 and I had to turn off fast boot (there was no secure boot or legacy option in my UEFI). You can do this most easily via recovery options in Windows. In other words, with my ASUS, I could only access UEFI settings from within Windows (Windows will restart into UEFI). After re-reading your question, I suspect that you ...


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You don't have to disable anything. I had this problem yesterday, and was able to fix it, now I can choose which OS I want to boot to. Below are the step. You can boot to Linux as a live user or if you can from your installed Linux, either way, try to start Linux. Make sure you are connected to the internet. Then type these commands one by one sudo ...


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Very late answer but in case anyone ever runs into this type of problem again you can type "fwsetup" into the Grub Bootloader Rescue text terminal and then enter the BIOS through that command.


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hold left shift key while booting.it will show the grub menu.


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I had the same problem two weeks ago. I didn't have a pre-installed Win8.1. I started out with a clean HDD. If you do have Win8 pre-installed, deactivate fast boot and secure boot. If that doesn't help, try with the utility tool boot-repair from a LiveUSB. For my problem in particular, after using boot-repair, my win8 didn't appear afterwards in GRUB, so ...


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The fact that you're getting I/O errors from at least two programs is telling. Such errors almost never result from software problems -- and when it is a software problem, it's likely to be a bad driver. I didn't notice anything obvious in the SMART test results you posted, so my guess is you've got a bad cable to the hard disk, or possibly a bad disk ...



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