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First of all, you do not need to disable "Secure Boot" to install Ubuntu any more. It looks like your computer is with bios, not UEFI, becuase it was natively with Windows 7. You do not need to do anything special to install in dual boot with Windows 8. Just do not forget to shut down Windows properly. It is hibernated by default. So just install Ubuntu ...


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It is likely the usb drive. Alot of usb drives now have "Windows 8 certification" which makes it impossible to boot a live distro. I would refer here to the faulty ones. You may also need to disable secure boot. Isn't microsoft the worst for messing all this up? Disabling quick boot might also help. Also, as another user said you may also need to go to the ...


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You can instruct Windows what to do when you hit the "Power Button". Your distro is sensing that Windows is hibernating, meaning that your user state is stored on the hard drive and is accessed at boot. To make sure it is not hibernating, go to the control panel, find the power settings, set it to power off, not hibernate, when you hit the off button. By ...


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It might be the USB drive. Some USB sticks don't work as liveUSB sticks. I've had some dodgy sticks in the past (especially Kingston ones). Try another USB stick.


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The best choice for create a bootable USB in Ubuntu is multisystem This tool allows you to create an USB with multiple bootable OS. (You can add Ubuntu, Debian, Windows XP, Windows 7... The tutorial on the official page is very well explained on how to do this: MultiSystem: Create multiboot usb on linux I will make a resume of the steps you will need to ...


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Linux should support hyperthreading and virtualization (in probably all mainstream AMD/Intel processors): Virtualization - You can use various programs to virtualize, such as VirtualBox, Gnome Boxes etc Hyperhtreading - it working should show twice the amount of CPUs in system monitor, to check in more detail this post may help You should be able to test ...


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I started winusb from console: sudo winusbgui then winusb detect my pendrive correctly, and I succesfully copied the Windows 7 installer to my pendrive (Ubuntu 14.10).


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Found the problem!! Out of the total 100GB partition I made, I used 2GB swap area and made another root partition for the rest of the space for Ext4. My problem was, at the drop down, to install the linux loader, I kept checking the sdb which is my HDD. But my windows 8 loader was on my sda. Even though you want to put linux on a different hard drive than ...


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You need to install a bootloader like GRUB. For now, try to go into your BIOS settings (F12 usually does this) and choose the default boot disk.


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I had the same issue with my GTX 750 Ti. I was able to resolve it with the following steps: Add nomodeset to bootloader (How do I set 'nomodeset' after I've already installed Ubuntu?) Run the following commands in terminal: sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:xorg-edgers/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install nvidia-346 Restart computer ...


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OK, so Try other distribuition linux? something other than Ubuntu? as well as Open Suse: mote information: http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=opensuse or just: Arch Linux http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=arch ( very simple and biggest alternative for to customize ) or Fedora like-Red hat enterprise linux Try, one ...


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First, insert your Live USB into your computer. Then, boot into windows 8. then, go to the Settings charm --> Power Options --> press Restart while holding the shift key. In the menu that appears, click on "Use a device." Then, select your Live USB, BUT MAKE SURE TO CHOOSE THE ENTRY WITH "EFI:" IN FRONT. THIS IS WHAT WILL MAKE YOU AVOID THE ERROR. Then, ...


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dont try boot repair try to update grub once you log into ubuntu type this grub2 update it should fix your problem if that wont help you its most likely of stupid way windows comes preinstalled on laptops ourdays you will be able to fix it only by reinstalling windows and ubuntu, id say going over boot menu is not that big of problem


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First you need to run "scandisk /f" on the windows partition to repair any corrupt files. It has been my experience that removing the drive and placing it in another PC as a slave or external drive is the best way to accomplish this. Once scandisk has run, return the drive to its original PC and try booting (don't forget to reset any jumpers on the drive if ...


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Change UEFI to legacy, reboot press F8 or F11 or F12 depending on your model and get to boot menu, and boot from usb


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Try looking at: http://download.lenovo.com/consumer/mobiles_pub/lenovo_g40_g50_z40_z50_ug_english.pdf ( page 34, above "Getting HElp ) change UEFI for legacy Support. your manufacturer, does not tell which is Linux( distribution ) compatible your Hardware.


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Finally found answer.....Solved perfectly: I use HP so I had recovery partition ,I booted into windows recovery(F11 in my case). Then went to Repair your computer...this should fix my problem But it couldn't find anything.So here is my solution: go to troubleshoot in recovery menu. Click Advanced options in Troubleshoot screen. Click on command Prompt. ...


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Run the command sudo os-prober If the output shows you Windows then you are in safe. So From your booted Ubuntu system, use the following command in a terminal: sudo update-grub This should help. If the problem still then from the windows recovery console: bootrec / fixmbr Then bootrec / fixboot then update-grub again from your Ubuntu


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I had this problem after installing Ubuntu 14.04 alongside windows 8.1 on my nice new lenovo thinkpad t540p laptop. However, all I had to do was disable the secure boot option in the bios. Having done that, the grub menu allows me to boot either Ubuntu or Windows from the options. I did not need to do anything else.


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First, your teacher was wrong in saying you can't have two EFI-based OSes on a single hard disk; there's no problem with such a configuration. In fact, once you understand the rules and the quirks of your particular computer, it's generally easier to install more OSes on an EFI-based computer than on a BIOS-based one. Those two caveats are important, though; ...


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Boot with Ubuntu Live USB. Install Ubuntu somewhere. Boot with Ubuntu, open Terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) and run the command sudo update-grub Now restart your PC. You should see both Windows and Ubuntu options at GRUB boot menu. That's all the help I can provide with the information you gave, hope it helps!


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Your problem description is not entirely clear to me. But The correct procedure for dual booting is pretty simple. First install windows in a partition. Then install ubuntu in another partition. And use ubuntu grub to access your desired operating system while booting. And if you have done in this way, your windows partition should be fine.


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To resize/shrink a partition or volume in Windows, open the Disk Management tool. This can be found through a simple search in the Start Menu search bar. Once you open the tool, either select an existing volume/partition to shrink/resize, or select unallocated space to create a new volume/partition with. If you choose to make a new partition, you will be ...


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First, try to boot into Windows by fixing it using a Windows Vista/7/8 Disk. To do this, boot from Installation Disk, Select Repair and enter a command prompt. Type in:- bootrec.exe /fixboot bootrec.exe /fixmbr Restart your PC and see if you can now boot into Windows.


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Get Boot-Repair Tool and burn it into Live USB. Follow the instructions here. You can also try EasyBCD. post back if this did not solve your problem with the exact error you are getting.


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I think that your GRUB may be messed up. Try inserting the Ubuntu install CD, and click "Try Ubuntu." When the desktop loads up, open terminal, and install Boot-repair using these commands: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair Click the recommended repair button ...


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If Ubuntu still exists on your HDD, boot from Ubuntu live CD and use the commands below to install boot-repair. Connect to the Internet. Open a new Terminal, and run: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair sudo add-apt-repository ppa:kranich/cubuntu sudo apt-get ...


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You encountered Redmond's idea that Windows should be the only OS on your hard disk. When you installed 8.1, the installation disk overwrote the boot manager and made Windows the default OS. There is a simple fix using Unbuntu Boot Repair. Go to the web page and download the iso image. Create a boot CD and then start your system with the CD. When you have ...


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It's possible to resize partitions in such a way that data are not lost, although the amount of free space on the resized partition(s) will change. New partitions for Ubuntu can then be created in the space "vacated" by the resized partition(s). The Ubuntu installer can do this automatically or semi-automatically in some cases. BEWARE, THOUGH! There are ...


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You should allocate a separate partition for Ubuntu if you are planning to dual-boot with windows. If you choose so, make sure that you have moved all data from these partition(s) to some other partition because installing Ubuntu will format this partition and you will lose data if you put anything here. In addition, installing Ubuntu alongside windows like ...


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Note: As of right now, Ubuntu 15.04 will BOOT on a bay trail tablet, but it will not install correctly. My guide is based mostly on this one, but with minor adjustments, and easier to follow instructions. This guide is tested and working on the Winbook Tw100 Windows 8 tablet (by Microcenter). You may require: USB OTG (on the go) cable, for connecting the ...


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Boot into your Ubuntu LiveUSB/CD. In the setup, choose Something Else when prompted where to install Ubuntu. Next, double-click your partition meant for Ubuntu. For the Type option (or something similar), select the ext4 option from the dropdown. Select to format it and write / as the mount point. Click OK and then Next. Ubuntu will install to that ...


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All of the memory will be dedicated to the virtual machine when it is started. (I recommend that you buy more RAM if you want to use this VM regularly though.) It is enough to just press Delete. That will delete the virtual machine entirely from your system. Oracle VM VirtualBox is easily the best choice for running Windows 8.1 in a virtual machine. Just ...


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No, windows 8 is not supported by WUBI. It is normally shipped inside the ubuntu ISO, and if one copies the wubi.exe out of the CD, you can use it for wubi based installation. Read the post from one of the Developers.


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(Disclaimer: I've only done this on Windows 7, however I understand it should work just as well on 8.1.) Step 1 Install EasyBcd on Windows. Step 2 Make sure you have a recovery or installation cd/usb for Windows 8. You'll need it. You can generate one from within Windows 8 itself if you don't have one. See ...


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Here's how the issue was resolved in my case, with the help of the volunteers at Boot-Repair: Do a normal install of Ubuntu alongside Windows following the well-known instructions (turn off secure boot, turn off fast boot etc etc). In other words do the stuff I'd done before posting this question. If Ubuntu is inaccessible, run Boot Repair from a live disc ...


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What you can do is to boot live USB, and partition your 500 GB HHD to have an ext4 partition, say of 250 GB in size, and leave the other 250 GB for Windows 8. Once done, boot into Ubuntu normally, and find out the UUID of the partition that you created. For that , use sudo blkid, or sudo blkid | awk '/ext4/ {print }'. Once you know it, edit /etc/fstab to be ...


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I just dealt with the same problem... Maybe it will help somebody: I was getting this error when I clicked TARGET DEVICE and INSTALL, but if you click OPTIONS and SHOW ALL DEVICES and then you select your TARGET USB drive, it works... or at least it did in my case. Of course my drive was formatted as NTFS! EDIT: At the end of process error appeared, but ...


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You can try using Boot-Repair which attempts to automatically fix common booting problems (such as the one you're having). However, you'll need to run it on a Boot Disk.


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You need to repair your windows 8.1 boot config. This is done by loading up win 8.1 recovery/install cd and selecting the repair my computer option from the menu choose troubleshoot, then command prompt enter these commands in command prompt. bootrec /FixMbr bootrec /FixBoot bootrec /ScanOs bootrec /RebuildBcd Press Enter after each command and wait for ...


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Have you tried switching to other windows manager? For example, lightdm, gdm, kdm, xdm. You can do that by simply running sudo apt-get install kdm, then run sudo dpkg-reconfigure kdm, and choose that one or install any other windows manager and do the same thing.


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You can. Yo have to choose "Replace Windows 8 with Ubuntu" in "Installation Type" step.


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Try Switching off UEFI and change to 'Compatibility" mode in the BIOS to see if it helps.(This may slow the boot of Windows unfortunately) If not try this link which may help. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI Good luck and ask for more help if necessary


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Check in your BIOS if devices are booted during boot (you have to disable all types of "quick boot", even "Windows quick boot").


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If a USB keyboard & plugged into a PCI expansion card then try in mobo's I/O panel directly.


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I found an answer to my problem. I wasn´t able to shrink the windows partion by more than ≈ 7 GB (I think it´s because Windows won´t let you go under 30 GB free space) in Windows 8.1 Disk management. I therefor downloaded Partition Wizard and used that to shrink my SSD to what I wanted (I shrinked it by 20 GB, leaving me with ≈ 15 GB of free space left on ...


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Have you tried using Windows to resize the partition? I have done this several times with Windows 8.1 and it works very well. It will tell you, if resizing is not possible.


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I faced the same problem with Dell Inspiron 15 3542 with Intel HD 4400 graphics. GRUB_TERMINAL="console" Enabling the above line in /etc/default/grub solves the problem but disables the graphical grub and presents a basic text based Grub screen. Mismatch in the resolution of graphical grub and windows boot screen appears to be the cause of the problem. ...



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