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I'm going to take some key points of your question out of order: I can't run UEFI because we'll, it literally doesn't exist on my computer anymore. I think you misunderstand what UEFI is. As described in more detail on Wikipedia, the Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) and its version-2.x variant, the Unified EFI (UEFI) is a type of firmware that has ...


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Every 64bit x86 CPU can run 32bit x86 instructions, so there is nothing special about that... AFAIK, 64bit UEFI only works with 64bit Ubuntu. I think when dual booting with Windows 8, using UEFI is the best alternative. I can't run UEFI because we'll, it literally doesn't exist on my computer anymore. How do you mean that? If you didn't do a FW ...


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I'm glad you got it. As far as wubi goes (for anyone taking a look at this): Wubi will not work will not work along side Windows 8 (which I assume you were using) as long as the system is a UEFI system. For more information you can check out https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WubiGuide


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Try this: Open Advanced sharing settings by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type network, click Network and Sharing Center, and then, in the left pane, click Change advanced sharing settings. Click the chevron Picture of the chevron icon to expand your current network profile. Under ...


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Thanks, I couldn't figure out the EasyBCD thing, I think it was creating a grub boot for the SSD where Windows is installed. Instead when BIOS is booting, I select the SSD where Linux is installed and it loads, likewise I do the same for Windows.


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As the_Seppi stated, using the the bootrec.exe /fixboot and /fixmbr should work. Sometimes the boot flag can be removed from the partition to boot from. Try creating a live USB of GParted and look for the following: You will notice that the boot flag is on my 2GiB boot partition. If you do have to add the boot flag back, reboot back into recovery mode for ...


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The partitioning scheme can be anyway you like it.Just be sure you do not delete your Windows partitions when creating or modifying ones for Ubuntu. Paying attention will help with this. Please take a look at: Partitioning Schemes - Ubuntu Help for some additional info regarding how to partition your machine. The following set up is how I have three of my ...


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You erased Windows. Did you do full backup of Windows? If you had also used the Something Else install option on reinstall you would not have had this problem. But auto reinstall erases system. If you have any data you want to try to recover stop using system. You will not be able to recover all data nor workable system. You can try testdisk or photorec, ...


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Assuming the Boot Repair output you posted is still accurate (you note in a comment that you re-installed Ubuntu, but it's not clear if that was before or after you ran Boot Repair), it seems that the GRUB setup scripts are not detecting Windows. There are several things you can try to fix this: You should disable the Windows Fast Startup feature. This ...


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If your disk uses MBR partition table, then both Windows and Linux root partitions should be in first 3 partitions on disk (if you want to use extended/logical partitions) or in first 4 partitions (but then you cannot use extended/logical partitions, because MBR is limited to max number of 4 "normal" partitions). If your disks uses GPT partition table, then ...


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Your partitioning is reasonable. Order of partitions does not matter. Yes, you can. It depends on what you will install to Ubuntu /home partition. E.g. steam games are installed there. But generally it must be enough in most cases.


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I don't understand why you used EasyBCD, as it's really not necessary in this case. It appears to be that you have been booted to a Grub shell. Take a look at this for how you should boot to your Linux HDD. Once you do that, run (in a terminal): sudo update-grub and it should automatically add entries to your Grub configuration.


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You can install Ubuntu which ever way you prefer. Most Linux distributions including Ubuntu will use a boot loader. So when you install it there will be a menu that gives you choices to choose which OS to run. You can configure the grub file for a specific timeout period and which OS to boot from by default. Either way there will be a boot loader. However ...


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Ubuntu will install perfectly fine on the G80 using UEFI mode. Do the following to install Ubuntu properly: Return the laptop to the original boot setting, not legacy Download Rufus to create the bootable USB drive (which works with UEFI and MBR) Reboot with flash drive connected (pressing F8 for boot options or F1 for BIOS setup whichever allows you to ...


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The easiest (and fastest) way is to buy a crossover cable, plug it into both machines and install NitroShare on both the Windows and Ubuntu System. On the Windows PC, right-click the NitroShare icon, choose Send Directory and send the directory with your files over to the Ubuntu System... Done! P.S. If you're short on cash, don't buy the cross-cable and ...


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This is link have a people quesion problems same you. this You can find answer for you


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I tried to install Ubuntu 15.04 on an Acer Aspire-E15 laptop which has the preinstalled Windows 8.1 and had no Linux before. My first reboot after finishing the Ubuntu installation still automatically went to Windows 8.1 without any clue. The following are the steps I used to solve my problem and may also be useful to those people who want to get the ...


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You can use VMware or virtual box, and load any OS inside the VMware. Third party software not showing in boot loader so when ever you want to load Ubuntu or any other OS just run VMware. But the thing is you need to run windows, so it just like a parallel way run other OS in windows. Thanks


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After inserting ubuntu live DVD you can see windows drive in NTFS format. All the drives listed in NTFS format are windows rest will either unassigned or EXT format(which is ubuntu). steps to do dual boot windows & ubuntu. Assuming you windows is working fine and a separate 10GB drive works fine for ubuntu. after selecting something else checkbox ...


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Boot into a live CD and try this Ubuntu option instead of the easyBCD one in windows. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair I've had similar issues.


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if you're using grub but it's not detecting windows try: sudo update-grub result will be like: Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-3.19.0-21-generic Found initrd image: /boot/initrd.img-3.19.0-21-generic Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-3.19.0-18-generic Found initrd image: /boot/initrd.img-3.19.0-18-generic Found linux image: ...


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Perhaps it's not properly initializing the chipset or video card, or there is some issue with ACPI..If you can enter your BIOS Try to boot your windows Installation Disc....The Problem is due to Corrupted Drivers.So it is better to reinstall Windows..


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Try this: Boot from a Windows 8 recovery Cd/Dvd/Usb. If you don't have a recovery drive , then you will either have to install the drive into another Windows 8 machine or obtain a Windows 8 recovery drive. You will need to choose the language and time settings. Choose Repair Your Computer. Choose Troubleshooting. Choose Advanced Options. Choose Command ...


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You deleted your kernels and GRUB files, so you will not be able to boot anything. Get a Live CD/USB of a distribution you want and install it in that same partition. Then you will be able to boot Windows again.


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This was a known issue with kernel versions prior to 3.14 (see bug report here). Try updating to the most recent kernel and see if that fixes your problem. (If you don't know how to do that, see askubuntu page here). Additionally, I am fairly sure that messing with your swap partition caused this problem, as that shouldn't change the behavior of HID ...


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Yes, you can do it, if your computer has UEFI. Set Windows default OS in UEFI settings. Set Ubuntu default OS in grub. Set grub to be hidden. That works for me, but it may depend on UEFI.


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I solved it with the tip at the end of the boot info : I used bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\debian\grubx64.efi but i have to do it every time i restart my computer -_-'


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Your machine's BIOS is currently disabling virtualization. On startup, press enter (or equivalent for your machine) to enter the BIOS. Locate the Virtualization option - for me, it's in the "Processor" menu. There should be an option labelled something like "Virtualization Technology". I imagine it's disabled, if you're having this issue. Toggle it to be ...


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You can install "boot repair" to fix the problem and try to install "grub 2.0", if the problem persist try to disable fast boot and enable UEFI MODE


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Running ln -s (insertwindowsminecraftfolderhere) ~/ in Terminal should allow you to do this (You may need to delete ~/.minecraft in order for this to work (BACKUP YOUR DATA!)) Remember to replace (insertwindowsminecraftfolderhere) with the folder of your Windows hard drive's .minecraft folder! (i.e. if my Windows partition was mounted on /mnt/sda1 and my ...


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thanks for those of you who looked at my question and pondered it. I, in typical fashion, answered my own question only after I posted a question to a forum. I changed the boot order in UEFI (BIOS) to boot to Ubuntu first and that solved the problem.


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While the disk capacity is 1TB, the actual formatted capacity will be 931.51GB. This is because of the difference between how the OS counts the size, and how the HDD manufacturer counts it. Hardware manufacturers use what's known as a 'decimal byte', which means that they use powers of 10 in calculating size. OSes determine the size using a 'binary byte' ...


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what you see is value in GiB and not in GB look here: http://wintelguy.com/gb2gib.html 931.3225746154785 GiB = 1000 GB 1TB (terabyte) = 0.90949470177293 TiB (tebibyte) = 931 GiB 330 MiB 324 KiB So the answer is, your HDD has the full capacity it's supposed to. Also merging those circa 60 GiB to some of yours partitions is possible, but in your current ...


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Just install Windows 8.1 inside vmware like any other virtual machine. Then use your software inside of that virtual machine just as you would with a native 8.1 platform.


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Boot off the Windows disk via some function key at startup. If grub was installed to the second disk, and it was given boot order priority, the Windows bootloader will still be sitting unused on the first disk.


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UPDATE: My Windows updated (I do not know what the update was) and after that my computer now boots to the GRUB menu. I made no other changes to my computer so I am assuming somehow the update could have possibly addressed the problem? My only remaining issue is the fact that I'm still getting 10+ options on the GRUB menu. Ubuntu and the windows option I ...


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When you say inside Windows 8, you mean a dual-boot option, right? If, you need to partition your hard drive in the "disk management" and do a formatted partition dedicated for Ubuntu. The allocated space depends on what you're going to do - but 10-15gb minimum I'd say. The Ubuntu installer should recognize the unallocated space now, and you should be able ...


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Did you make another partition for Ubuntu? If you didn't, try making one by following these steps: Boot into Windows 8 (you will make the partition here). Search and open Disk Management. Here you should see your Hard Drive, right-click it and select Shrink a Basic Volume. This will create another volume. Once it is finished loading, you will be able to ...


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Realizing this thread is a little dated, I came across it while seeking info on installing Ubuntu onto OS X and just wanted to close it up for the next person who might stumble across it. To answer the question, know that when you get to the point in the process where you have to choose between overwriting your existing install (Windows or OS X), or ...


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It's not clear if you've installed Ubuntu in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode or if you're saying you haven't yet installed it but that you can boot the installer in BIOS mode. If you want to boot the installer, either to install directly or to run Boot Repair, you must find your EFI's built-in boot manager. In most cases, this can be accessed by hitting a function key ...


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Try this: Plug your external HDD. Switch on your computer. Boot in Windows via Grub. Unplug your external Hdd. Go into the Advanced options and run the Command Prompt. Enter diskpart to use the DiskPart tool to ensure you have all the right partitions and to identify your EFI partition it is formatted as Fat32. diskpart DISKPART> Then select ...


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If you see entries in your firmware's boot manager called ubuntu and Windows Boot Manager, then both Ubuntu and Windows are installed in EFI mode, not in BIOS mode. In EFI mode, boot loaders reside on the EFI System Partition (ESP), not on the MBR of the hard disk. To be sure of this, look for a directory called /sys/firmware/efi in Ubuntu. If it's present, ...


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For a clean boot of Ubuntu over Windows boot manager on MBR style disks you can chain load either a) grub boot record or b) "boot.img" file from grub folder using a so called "boot sector loader" in Windows 7 or Windows 8. For detailed steps see Dual-boot Windows 7 and Linux/Unix. On UEFI and GPT disks chain loading Linux from Windows boot manager ...


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Any tool which can write a Windows MBR can do. For example using Windows boot sector utility: bootsect /nt60 SYS /mbr bootsect.exe is part of Windows 8 and later. Earlier it was only available on Windows recovery console. For cleaning a disk the Windows command "diskpart.exe" can be used. diskpart list disk (this lists disks with size info) ...


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To clear Ubuntu from your dual-boot hard drive computer, you have to: Put in your recovery disk or Windows Installation Disk, or make one. You should see this: Or this: After you get these menus, click command prompt and type this command in: bootrec /fixmbr Now, you can uninstall Ubuntu without GRUB messing with your stuff. To delete the Ubuntu ...


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You need to create four partitions: N) fs, size, mountpoint 1) ext2, 512 MB, /boot 2) ext4, at least 10 GB, / 3) ext4, at least 5 GB, /home 4) swap, 2x available RAM, none Then when installing from disk, it will ask you to erase windows or install alongside. Make sure you choose "Something Else". Then, make the partitions as described above. ...


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You shouldn’t have any issues, the issues occur when you have to dual boot an EXISTING Windows 8 OS and older Ubuntu versions. But if you are using 15.04 and you are installing Windows 8 after that there really should not be any issues or special procedures that you have to follow. You just may want to make a Ubuntu Livecd/flashdive and a boot repair cd/usb ...


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according to your report there is No boot loader installed... you have to (re)install GRUB, the default boot loader of Ubuntu. please have a look at: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Grub2/Installing


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Perhaps your Master Boot Records is damaged. Burn Ubuntu Live USB / DVD (You can do it via Unetbootin). Boot the machine in Live Ubuntu environment. Open up terminal and type sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair; \ sudo apt-get update; \ sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair Once the boot-repair window pops up , ...


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I have had problems with 14.04 on a newer laptop, but from some reading I found that 15.04 has the capability to install with secure boot enabled. I tried it two days ago and it worked just fine. I only disabled fast boot, but left secure boot enabled in UFEI. I have had success installing 14.04 after I disabled secure boot and fast startup. You might want ...



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