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When you installed Ubuntu after Windows 8, you also installed the GRUB bootloader which is handled by the Ubuntu GRUB manager which lets you select which operating system to boot. In your case, either Windows or Ubuntu. When you restarted your computer after deleting the Ubuntu partition it is searching for GRUB, but you deleted it. That is why the problem ...


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First, you say your "BIOS is UEFI," but that's not true. You almost certainly have no BIOS; you have a UEFI. This may sound like splitting hairs, but it's not; referring to an EFI/UEFI as a "BIOS" drags in a lot of assumptions that simply do not apply in the EFI world. ("UEFI" is essentially version 2.x of EFI, so I generally use "EFI," as it's the more ...


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Here is a step by step on how I did it: 1. Install Windows 8.1 2. disable secureboot in bios (or in some cases allow it to run other Os's) 3. turn off fast boot 4. install ubuntu alongside windows.


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Assuming your title has the correct wording, here's how to get Unity back: Press Ctrl + Alt + F2 to enter TTY. From here, login with your username and password. Once the prompt appears, run sudo apt-get install unity. If you only somehow disabled Unity, this should get it working again: Press Ctrl + Alt + F2 to enter TTY. From here, login with your ...


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Have you tried using Windows to resize the partition? I have done this several times with Windows 8.1 and it works very well. It will tell you, if resizing is not possible.


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All of the memory will be dedicated to the virtual machine when it is started. (I recommend that you buy more RAM if you want to use this VM regularly though.) It is enough to just press Delete. That will delete the virtual machine entirely from your system. Oracle VM VirtualBox is easily the best choice for running Windows 8.1 in a virtual machine. Just ...


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You can. Yo have to choose "Replace Windows 8 with Ubuntu" in "Installation Type" step.


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Boot into an Ubuntu Live CD/USB and open a terminal. Run sudo mount -t vfat -o iocharset-utf8,umask=000 /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1. You'll need to run sudo mkdir /mnt/sda1 first. Once it's mounted, browse the EFI drive in Nautilus and delete every folder called "Ubuntu".


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Try this: Boot your Ubuntu installation disc, but select the "try before installing" option. Open a Terminal window. Verify that the /sys/firmware/efi directory is present. If not, reboot in EFI mode. (You were in EFI mode when you installed.) Type sudo efibootmgr -o 2,2002,1,3001. This command changes the boot order so that GRUB is first. (See lines ...


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You need to reinstall Ubuntu, but without changing to Legacy mode in the BIOS. Ubuntu supports EFI perfectly. I'm pretty sure your problem is that the EFI version of Windows 8 was installed, while you installed the BIOS/Legacy version of Ubuntu. Try to boot into the legacy part of Windows when it is EFI won't work. You could also try this, in case you ...


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I don't see a reason why you should be concerned. As long as you have enough free disk space on the Windows partition to do the upgrade there should be no further issues. I did an upgrade from Windows 8 to 8.1, where disk space was the only issue I had.


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It shouldn't, Windows 10 will be released via Windows Update, and it's highly unlikely. I'm using the Insider Preview of Windows 10, and it hasn't done anything to Ubuntu, but if you're unsure, wait until around June, when it will be released to Windows Update. If it did break, you could always use the fix install option when you use the Live CD.


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Chances are one of two things has happened (maybe both): You installed Ubuntu incorrectly, in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode when Windows was installed in EFI/UEFI mode. In almost all cases, it's best to install Ubuntu in the same mode as Windows. Doing otherwise can create symptoms like those you describe. There have been a number of recent questions about this, ...


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I faced the same problem with Dell Inspiron 15 3542 with Intel HD 4400 graphics. GRUB_TERMINAL="console" Enabling the above line in /etc/default/grub solves the problem but disables the graphical grub and presents a basic text based Grub screen. Mismatch in the resolution of graphical grub and windows boot screen appears to be the cause of the problem. ...


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Fastest way to solve your problem: Boot Ubuntu from a Live DVD Launch Gparted Select your device in the top-right combobox Click on Device > Create partition table... Create a new msdos partition table (all data on the drive will be lost!) Shut down and install Windows


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When you deleted your Ubuntu partition, you also chucked out your GRUB installation. GRUB is the bootloader for your machine which lets you boot into either Ubuntu, Windows, or any other present OS. To boot back into Windows, you should be able to interrupt your boot and enter the UEFI by pressing one of the following common keys after powering on: F1 F2 ...


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Have you tried updating the grub boot loader with: sudo update-grub


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As the MD5SUM on Windows section of the HowToMD5SUM help wiki article says, no md5sum-checking utility is included as part of Windows, but you can download a utility online to verify the md5 hash of your downloaded Ubuntu ISO image. WinMD5Sum (by Nullriver Software) is one such utility. Download and install winMD5Sum, a free and open source hash ...



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