Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

can i use linux min alongside windows 8.1 and ubuntu /Triple boot both ubuntu and windows 8.1 already installed.


5

Good that you already solved the part of switching from Windows to Linux. The other direction is not that hard: There is the command grub-reboot that does just what you need - see below for detais: If your grub menu entry for the system you want to boot is "Windows", you would just do: $ grub-reboot Windows If you configure the hardware to boot after ...


0

Unfortunately you can't install from a VM to a physical disc. You will need to create a bootable disc or USB and install as you would from scratch. The problem that may come from doing Windows second is you will most likely have to go about repairing GRUB after the install. I would highly suggest backing up your /home folder and wiping the drive to do a ...


0

Ok I think I can answer your question. The partition should not be unallocated. If you use Gparted, go to the program and right click on the unallocated button. Click "new". You will see a drop down menu. Select ntfs. I hope this helps.


1

If you are facing trouble in accessing your shared folder, you can try following. First install Guest Additions. After installing Guest Addition, go to Devices -> Shared Folder form VirtualBox's menu and add you folder. Now make a directory using sudo mkdir /media/windows. This directory will be used as mount point of shared folder. Once mount point has ...


-1

You need not dual boot for the using both the desktop environments you could install the other one using sudo apt-get install "desktop_environment" If you want to dual boot in the virtualbox here is the link which helps you http://www.sysads.co.uk/2014/01/dual-boot-windows-8-ubuntu-13-10-virtualbox/


0

Please use the following 4 commands: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo sed 's/trusty/saucy/g' -i /etc/apt/sources.list.d/yannubuntu-boot-repair-trusty.list sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && (boot-repair &) Source: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair


0

Semi-easy (I think) Grab your Windows 7 Install Disc and repair the Windows install. It will automatically recreate the boot table. Grab your Ubuntu Install Disc and open a commandline. In that, type sudo grub-install /dev/sda. Boot into Ubuntu and open up a commandline. Run sudo update-grub


0

I got this problem solved after a few experiments. Disconnect your internet and then start wubi.exe and it will use the iso file in the same directory. It may be a good idea to reconnect internet when your computer restarts for proper installation of ubuntu. Thanks everybody.


0

You can connect your DVD drive to the VM, or make an ISO of the DVDs. In the settings of the VM: Note the small image of a CD next to the drop-down list. Click it and select your Host Drive. You don't need to enable Passthrough. To create a disk image, open Brasero, and use the "Disk Copy" option.


0

Ok, it's solved now, the solution was to just simply disable the msata chache under windows instead of the bios, and after installation of ubuntu enabling it again. Thanks for your help


0

Well rather than uninstalling it, I'd delete the partition, to make it free space, and then expand the Windows partition into it, so yes, you could. Unfortunately Ubuntu uses the ext4 file system, and windows uses the nfts file system. You could (theoretically) access between them, but I'm not sure how good Windows is with ext.


0

For "something else", this link is quite helpful. How to use manual partitioning during installation? To summarize, a few points to remember: Create partition for root, / (the size is the total free space minus size for swap); Create partition for SWAP (the size is at least the size of RAM); Make sure you have an EFI partition which is usually there if ...


0

Unfortunately wubi is no longer supported and the absolute most reliable way to install is by booting a livecd/usb that you have burned. On windows 8 based systems wubi has been proven to not work at all.


0

Ok, here's my 2 cents, as I ran into the same issue on my Windows7 64bit installation, when trying to install Ubuntu 14.04 alongside: it didn't recognize my windows OS... This was happening when using the Live CD of Ubuntu 14.04... I also had a bootable USB drive with this iso, so thought 'what the heck, let's just try...', booted from the USB stick, and ...


-2

I have MUCH more knowledge of Windows OS's than I have with Linux Ubuntu....I can tell you (firsthand) that is a hard drive is formatted with a Windows utility, then rarely can/will Linux boot ! Windows 7 is NOT a 32 bit language (read by OS's) and most Linux OS's/Distros are 32 bit. What this means is: If Windows was installed ...


0

I now noticed something strange is going on, after installing ubuntu again and restarting, the ext4 partition was just gone, and it had been replaced by hp_tools and hp_recovery, which i deleted prior to the install. I checked before restarting and then they weren't there. Strange. I will try to remove those properly, using windows and not the live usb, and ...


0

Look here for copying /home/your-username: How to migrate user settings and data to new machine? Look here for transferring packages: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2010/05/transfer-your-packages-to-a-clean-install/


0

Download the boot repair cd, boot from it and just accept the default settings. Thats how i fixed grub in my ubuntu and windows 8.1 setup.


0

No, you cannot use Boot-Repair to wipe your computer. That tool cannot wipe any partition indeed, it is aimed at recovering access to operating systems. To remove Ubuntu and replace it by Windows7, you just need to wipe your hard disk via Gparted (included in Ubuntu disc), then install Windows.


0

To my knowledge you cannot install Ubuntu on an NTFS partition. This is likely what caused the problem. Deleting the Ubuntu partition visible in Disk Management and reinstalling Ubuntu might fix it. You should leave the space as free space inside windows, then create an ext4 partition from within the Ubuntu installer. Or choosing install alongside Windows ...


0

This probably is a laptop that came with Windows 8. Did you enable Launch CSM and Launch PXE OpROM ? And, if you have the option in the BIOS, change booting mode from UEFI to Legacy.


0

I'm assuming you already checked the BIOS settings for boot order etc. since you mention Ubuntu does boot from USB. Also, make sure secure boot is disabled in the BIOS. In some instances, you have to set a BIOS admin/supervisor password before you are allowed to change the setting. Other Possible issues could be the thumb drive, the utility you are using to ...


0

If you don't have any unused space, how do you think install a operating system? You must have some space! Add another hard disk to your system and install it over there. Or move you files to the extra hard disk and install ubuntu on the system hard disk. But, you must have some space to install Ubuntu. Since it's not a regular program it needs some space..


0

ubuntu will be installed on a different partition and the Windows partition will not be affected. On but you will have the possibility to choose which OS start


1

To answer the question in the title: Can I Use Boot-Repair To Wipe My Computer? No, you can't. See Misconception about boot-repair below. Creating Windows UEFI media With this question you are asking how you can install Windows 7 on your UEFI-capable computer, correct? The commands you pasted look non-functional to me. I'm ignoring everything ...


0

I'm actually pretty sure that Ext2Fsd has support for reading ext4 volumes. If you don't need to write to the Ubuntu side from your Windows install (just want to see the files, not create new ones) you can install the Ext2Fsd driver. This way you don't have to go about mucking about with you partitions.


1

Windows uses the NTFS file system by default, whereas Ubuntu uses the ext4 file system. Windows cannot read ext4, whereas Ubuntu can read NTFS. Therefore you have two options, the first one preferable: Create 3 new partitions. One very large one for Data (e.g. photos, music, documents) as NTFS that both OS can use. One medium sized one (say 10-20GB) for ...


0

Download the Ubuntu iso File Extract it Find Wubi.exe in extracted folder double click it and follow on screen instructions


0

No its not a silly question. :) Ubuntu used to have a windows installer (for XP and win7) called Wubi (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WubiGuide#Warning). With it you could install Ubuntu without the need to partition you hard disk (its main benefit). But it has been dropped starting version 13.04 and as far as I know is not being maintained. You can still dual ...


0

You should read this page for further informations: Ubuntu Wiki Wubi Guide


0

I have a similar setup with a Ubuntu machine crammed full of drives in a LAN with Windoze machines. Each drive has a shared folder on it. When I look under "Network" on the windoze machines the Ubuntu machine does not show up. Until I type "\\ubuntu-machine-name" into the Search box on the windows machine. A file Explorer window opens with the shared ...


2

As said upgrading your ubuntu will not break or touch you windows. The only problem you may have is is grub update fails which is very unlikely and easily fixable.


0

Upgrading Ubuntu will not touch your Windows partition.


0

First make a backup of your flashdrive's files on another computer Secondly download a Windows 7 ISO and Unebootin http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/ Using Unebootin create a bootable USB (make sure it's plugged in) with the Win7 ISO Follow this tutorial if you have problems https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KPZJ0oCQxu0


0

To install Window$ on drive with data you need: For EFI boot: GPT partition table. EFI partition formatted as FAT16, preferably in the beginning of the drive. Empty space for window$ itself. For non-EFI boot: MBR partition table Empty space for window$ bootloader in the beginning of the drive. - 150Mb suffice. Empty space for Window$ itself. In ...


1

You should shrink the partition from within Ubuntu (use GParted, or something similar). You then can use the unformatted space to create a NTFS partition using Windows. Note that Windows annoyingly overwrites the boot-sector and insists on using the Windows bootloader, so you need to reinstall GRUB afterwards; see: ...


0

When you install Ubuntu, if you select Erase HDD or Remove Windows 7 or you install Ubuntu in windows 7 system partition, don't have any way to restore Windows 7. If not. Try repair boot follow the instructions in: Boot Repair


0

If you still have ubuntu root partition you can use Boot-repair. Link for how to do that https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair


0

Boot from the DVD and elect to install right away or "try Ubuntu" which gives you a live session that you can also launch the installer from. During the install, Ubuntu will detect your Windows installation and ask you what you'd like to do about it, with a popular option being to install Ubuntu alongside Windows by having Ubuntu resize your Windows ...


0

Your notebook can't be that old that it can't boot from USB or optical disc. Go into your BIOS settings and check the boot order of your system, or see if there is a key you can press during the POST process (Power On Self Test, usually when the manufacturer logo appears on-screen) that will bring up a boot device menu to choose from. For example, on ...


-2

this site may have what you need. http://www.webupd8.org/2012/09/grub-customizer-30-released.html http://www.webupd8.org/2011/02/how-to-boot-iso-with-grub2-easy-way.html..


0

If you have problem of Full screen Just Install Virtualbox 4.3.8 It would be work After hard-work of 3 days i uninstall Old or new virsion of virtualbox and installed 4.3.8 After installation, don't do anything just Click on Devices and then cleck on install Guest Additions..and after some process then reboot and finally You will get what you want ...


0

It seems wubi bootloader file is missing or corrupted. You can restore wubi bootloader using this guide.


0

You appear to have a system that boots via BIOS and that uses MBR partitions. MBR is limited to four "primary" partitions, and you've used all of them. MBR does support an essentially limitless number of "logical" partitions, but to use them, you must have a special type of primary partition called an "extended" partition, which you don't have. You have two ...


0

You need to use gparted and create an ext4 partition in that space you opened up, also there is no BIOS part of the disk, there is an MBR but that is not a partition and is not accessible from gparted or anything else. Once you have created the ext4 partition you restart the installation (sorry) and once you get to the screen you posted you select that ...


0

It appears that partition ordering has some issues. As seen in the snapshot, the 4th partition 17.01 GB (I guess this is going to be '/') and the 5th partition 2.99 GB (and this is going to be 'swap') are out of Extended partition (Green box). This must have confused your Linux installation. Please try these: Restore the Windows bootloader as instructed ...


0

Using windows recovery: In System recovery options, click command prompt. Now type Bootrec /RebuildBcd and then press ENTER. Restart your computer after it finishes. Emergency Tip: If the Bootrec.exe tool cannot locate any missing Windows installations. Type the following commands in the order from top to bottom. Bcdedit /export C:\BCD_Backup and ...


0

If the 100 GB partition is contiguous with the 20 GB partition, then you can do this fairly easily: Boot from a live CD/USB open a terminal alt+ctrl+t get gparted sudo apt-get install gparted run gparted, and choose to resize your Ubuntu partition. If the free space is not contiguous with the Ubuntu partition, you may need to move things about a bit. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included