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You can use the Other option, is not so hard. Go to Other, it will open gparted or a gparted-like program, add a new ext4 partition to the empty partition by pressing the + sign, and set the mount point of the new partition to / . Maybe it will warn you that you do not defined a swap space, but if you have 4GB memory, this is not necessary. (If you have less ...


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If you want to make a USB to install Windows in UEFI mode: Apply a GPT partition table to the USB drive and format it as FAT32 using GParted. Copy Windows files from DVD/ISO to USB using the file manager. On USB drive, copy the boot folder from efi/microsoft up one level to efi folder (applies only to Windows 7). Look for a bootx64.efi file in boot/efi ...


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I had the exact same problem (I was able to listen to the windows login sound even when the only think I saw was the grub purple screen). Luckily I found a workaround: move the file 30_os-prober to 06_os-prober (because I wanted the windows entries to be listed first) run upgrade-grub And now it works fine every time... I do not not understand why and I ...


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You seem to have EFI. In which case, this is a very simple fix: Enter your BIOS settings. You can usually get in by hitting the Esc, F1, F2, F7, F12, or the Del key. Check your computer's documentation for the specific key. You want to navigate to the "Boot Order" menu. Move "GRUB" to be beginning of the order, before the Windows Boot Manager. Save and ...


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Things magically started working about after creating an empty FAT partition of some 200MB as the first partition and doing nothing more after that. I was in the process of creating an EFI partition just as a test. Despite of what the BIOS was telling me about being in Legacy mode instead of UEFI, I wanted to make sure for myself. For some strange reason no ...


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I think that will be better to create another partition with those free 20GB. If I remember right, in installation process it ask you to format it (it isn't imperative I think). Also, even not formatting it, it could overwrite your data so I suggest you to create another partition (20GB) or move the data elsewhere and install it in the 50GB partition ...


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Given that setup, I would resize the existing partition with the data on it to be smaller, then install Ubuntu into a new partition in the new free space. I think this would be less risk, and would allow Ubuntu to be installed on a more Linux friendly filesystem (EXT) than the existing Windows (NTFS/FAT) partition


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I ruined my system, because I didn't realize this: Windows I believe installs and take the whole amount of space on your disk, for it's partition. You can make a USB bootable (google it) and try out Linux, then just use F12 during boot up, to choose to boot to the USB, don't follow the instructions to change windows to select the USB to boot, that's messed ...


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You will need to check you windows configuration. You mos likely are using the remote gateway, you do not want to have that checked. You want to only use the VPN tunnel when you are accessing IP's on the remote network.


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I've had the same thing happen I just manually partitioned it, it's really not that complicated if you follow steps listed here: How to use manual partitioning during installation?


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This may be helpful. Read This and see if it applies to you. http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/2014/05/install-ubuntu-1404-alongside-windows.html


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The error says that the windows Boot Configuration is missing. Follow the instructions at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927392 to repair your BCD. But I'm afraid you need a Windows disk to do this.


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Get the latest release of the boot-repair cd here and burn it to disk, boot off of it and then follow the instructions here. Recommended Repair will usually do the trick. I've rarely had to use the advanced options. Further information is available on this page.


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Boot into ubuntu on a live cd/usb Add boot repair disk Open Terminal sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo sed 's/trusty/saucy/g' -i /etc/apt/sources.list.d/yannubuntu-boot-repair-trusty.list sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair Run Boot Repair Application Select Recommended repair option Reboot and select OS you ...


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This must've been asked a million times on the site, but some quick searching didn't reveal the questions I know are here. The short answers are: Windows likes to pretend it's the only OS in the world, so installing it will always break any existing OS installs (next time, install Ubuntu last). Windows will never recognize an ext4 partition (but Ubuntu ...


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I just ran boot repair again, this time on the real ubuntu and that fixed my problem. Nothing special, just on the same auto repair settings.


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When I press Enter it directly goes to my windows7 os without prompting me the option to select diff OS(ubuntu). I have restarted my system even though i didn't get any option to select my ubuntu OS. This means the windows bootloader is currently not displaying the boot menu for you. Make sure that you have selected: Boot default OS after 30 seconds ...


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At last I booted win 7 by using Testdisk. Link to solution if anyone has problem in booting windows even thought all the files are present/intact. If you have damaged the boot sector of one of your partitions (e.g. by installing GRUB in it by mistake), you may have troubles. For example, if it is a Windows partition, you will not be able to boot into ...


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Boot your system using windows 7 installation CD to fix your windows boot. go to "repair your system" after selecting your language from first dialog. use command prompt (Troubleshoot ► Advanced Options ► Command Prompt) type bootrec /fixboot then hit enter type bootrec /fixmbr then hit enter THEN boot from Ubuntu live CD/Flash and do steps to restore ...


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I think it is might because of the VMware Player is not working properly with the new update. Here is a possible sulution: Disable vmwgfx fbdev in ubuntu. BE SURE TO BACKUP YOUR VM, BE IT USING SNAPSHOTS OR A COPY Edit the VM file /etc/modprobe.d/vmwgfx-fbdev.conf to set options vmwgfx enable_fbdev=0 Run sudo update-initramfs -u Reboot Then issue ...


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I will try to answer as many of your questions as I can: Is this a reasonable setup or is there anything I'm getting wrong (size/system)? What is reasonable for one user may not be for another. This is because we all use our computers for different purposes, and in different ways. As others have pointed out: You probably wont need 16GB Swap. 2GB should ...


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If you already have unused partitions of a previous (botched) Ubuntu installation, you should choose “something else“ instead of “alongside” and use the pre-existing partition(s). The duration of shrinking the Windows partition depends on the amount to shrink, the fill rate of its file systems, and the throughput of your hard drive. 30 h for <400 GB ...


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yes, not an expert on this but i'm assuming that the after plugging in both drives on your PC in order for you to be able to dual boot you only need update your Mbr or grub to reflect that you have two drives with boot-able Os plugged in order to do this I recommend you install Boot- Repair on your Linux Os and follow the tutorial provided by this link ...


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I don't think you'll be able to 'extend it' due to it's position on the drive, at least in the classical sense. Regardless of your decision after the fact, you will have to format the unallocated space, ideally with ext4 since that is what you used for your Ubuntu install partition. You will then be able to mount the new space. If your Ubuntu install was ...


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You can move and extend system partitions with GParted from a live system: Unmount and swap off all partitions with a key symbol in front of them (if any) through the context menu. Grow the extended partition (sda4) to include the unallocated space in front of it. Move and resize the logical partitions (sda5 and sda6) to your liking. Commit the changes and ...


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to solve the issue : in workstation >> right click on the VM ( Ubuntu) >> settings >> display >> on the right window , disable the "Accelerate 3D graphics check box".


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There is no maximum limit of OSs that can be installed in VirtualBox. Since all virtual machines are separate from each other, there will be no effect on host OS performance if you install another OS in VirtualBox unless both guest OSs are running at the same time. With 8GB of RAM there should be minimal or no effect on host OS performance after installing ...


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It sounds like you installed ubuntu on the "d" drive partition. That means that the "d" drive uses the ext3 or ext4 file system (Linux) which cannot be accessed from within windows because it is not supported. You can still access NTFS file systems (windows) from within Linux, though. If you have data on that drive that you need in windows then log in to ...


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Try to boot Ubuntu from your USB stick. When it reaches to the point to ask whether you want to install Ubuntu or try it choose the option which says Try Ubuntu. Once the desktop shows up open a terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T or by searching Terminal through the Dash. When you open the terminal type the following: sudo add-apt-repository ...


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Seems like your computer is finding the windows bootloader instead of grub (ubuntu bootloader). You may need to manually reinstall grub. What does your partition table look like? (Boot into live-cd, press try, search for/open gparted)


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It's wiser to install Linux as a separate OS on the hard drive, or using VirtualBox to run Ubuntu in a virtual machine within Windows. Wubi is bad, so don't use it as bolzao said Wubi installs Ubuntu inside Windows but messes with the bootloader and things. It still runs from a single container file inside the NTFS partitions of Windows, and there's a ...


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i suggest you installing as a seperate operating system.the easiest way to do that is using the wubi installer.just download wubi installer from the ubuntu website and install it you can choose any desktop ie. kde, xfce, unity etc and after installing you can use it as a seperate os, and if you want to delete the ubuntu just go to control panel from windows ...


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You can use GParted to delete the partition with Edubuntu and resize another partition. Delete sda7. Unmount (sda5) or swap off (sda6) any logical partitions through the context menu. Shrink sda4. Grow sda3. (This step can be done last in Windows if you don't trust the Linux NTFS tools to do the job right.) Commit the changes. Finally, you have to open a ...


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Can this be safely done? Yes. A little background. Both operating systems require one unencrypted partition for booting. Windows bitlocker has already created these partitions on your SSD: System reserved partition (unencrypted) Main partition (C:\) (encrypted) An MBR partition table can contain either four primary partitions or three primary ...


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If all you want to do is delete your "data" (files, pictures, etc), then just do a meticulous cleanup of the folders in which W7 keeps this stuff (My Documents, My Pictures, etc). This will allow u to keep your current W7 installation (and all updates). If you wipe-out (re-format the W7 partition), and then re-install Windows 7, the Windows 7 installation ...


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You need to reinstall GRUB on Master hard drive - it'll automatically fix it and you will see that GRUB would also include both Windows and Ubuntu. On your LIVE CD, do the same thing as if you were installing new system, but once you got past the hardware checking - cancel the process. This, then will take you to menu and reinstalling GRUB will be in that ...


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If you're going to install Ubuntu alongside Windows 7 then there is no need to wait for Ubuntu. You can go ahead and install Windows 7 on the hard drive and when you install Ubuntu 14.04 make sure you choose 'Install Ubuntu alongside Windows 7' and at that point you can set the size of the Linux partition.


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if you want to install Ubuntu & windows in same drive partition than you have use wubi. That will help you install Ubuntu in same partition with windows. here is link for how you can install Ubuntu using wubi. Help for Wubi I hope this will help you to solve your problem. This will 100% work for you. I done so many times.


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If I understand correctly, you want to install windows on a machine that already possess Ubuntu. Yes it is possible. But you will have to shrink your Ubuntu partition first in order to make some space for windows. Use gparted to shrink the partitions easily (especially if you are new). Then the windows installer should propose you an option to install ...


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i would say you that just avoid two option and install ubuntu alongside windows 7,sometimes it shows these types of error messages so no need to worry.one better way to use any other os other then windows you can use vmware or virtual box.


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Do you have the package os-prober installed? If not, try to download it and run grub-update once again. Hope it helps. Raphael


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Boot into BIOS Set the SATA mode to IDE Set the SATA3 mode to AHCI Install. You will need to change these settings back when you boot into Windows and vice versa, as Windows cannot boot with these settings. It is likely the bootloader will not show up, but that can be fixed easily by first typing sudo fdisk -l in a Terminal Then, run sudo mount ...


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There is a program for windows called easy bcd. Install it when running windows and the proceed a described in the following link: Download Easy BCD for window How to Use BCD I think this will help you to Insert ubuntu OS next of the windows7 in boot order.


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Use GParted to create NTFS partitions, which are used by default on Windows installations. You will still need to run the Windows installer from USB, DVD or CD though. You can try searching for alternative software that allows you to do just the same thing on Ubuntu. Other solution: Try installing Windows inside VirtualBox, a way to make a "virtual" ...


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I would do as gyropyge suggested and try a boot-repair option first. It's possible that somehow your boot loader is not seeing the Ubuntu partition or loading it correctly. Here is a link to the boot-repair-disk project on sourceforge: boot-repair-disk Additionally, I would also suggest that you look into virtualization. For projects that require both ...


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I have had the same problem and the solution after a great headache during days has been the following. Nothing can be more easy: In the option: file->preferences->input the following check box must be disabled: keyboard autocapture I am translating from spanish version, but there must be something similar in the english version. Greetings.


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Well, I don't know why previous answers suggest to act on registry key or hard links. There is a simple way to do this. First,partition your SSD. I think 2 partitions are too little. I'm currently using 5 main partitions: Windows: containing Windows OS. Depending on how you use this OS. I think that for a normal user it should be large from 40 to 60 GiB. ...


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You could keep your Windows installation on the SSD and resize its partition to make room to Linux. Or you could wipe everything and create new partitions, 1 NTFS for Windows and 2 for Linux (ext4 and swap). You would need to use a program such as Gparted or Easeus. Sometimes it's advised to remove the hard disk while installing Windows on the other one. ...


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The OP reported in a comment that the problem was solved by checking the downloaded ISO image's MD5SUM, discovering that it was wrong, and redownloading the ISO via bittorrent (which incorporates integrity checking during the downloading process and thus works better on some unreliable Internet connections). The checksum for the downloaded file was ...


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I am answering the part of the question that deals with the issue "I can't even resume Windows". I was also having this problem... in a system with dual-boot installation of Windows 7 and Ubuntu (actually Linux Mint 17 64-bit!), I have a modern system (Gigabyte motherboard with UEFI bios) and can selectively boot the Windows boot manager, the GRUB loader, ...



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