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Different computers have different requirements on bootable usb sticks, most of which make exactly 0 sense. You will be able to boot from a usb stick if you use this command: sudo dd bs=8M if=/path/to/image.iso of=/dev/sdx To get what to put instead of /dev/sdx, enter df -h when your thumb drive is mounted. You'll see a line like /dev/sdb1 ...


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Just install ubuntu after the other OS because it's easier with Grub like this.


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If you have multiple disk you may have to change in your bios the default one to boot in. The disk you have selected has only BCD (windows boot chain loader) so it uses that. Btw linux is not installed on windows bootchainloader, if you want to you can try to use EasyBCD (http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/easybcd.html) to edit this. Otherwise you may ...


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You need to set bios to boot from the disk where Ubuntu is installed. Then run sudo update-grub in Ubuntu. You will have options in grub menu.


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Okay, finally got it to work this morning. This time I installed both to the SSD again, making extra sure to direct Ubuntu to the Windows EFI partition during installation. The only two things I really did differently this time was formatting the HDD in GPT and running chkdsk three times on both the SSD and HDD, so thank you very much to oldfred for those ...


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You might like to use boot repair: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair (installable via USB live ubuntu)


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Use" fixmbr" command from Windows disc. It will remove grub. Then use Ubuntu live cd to restore grub. It should start working then.


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It isn't working because of that $ in the share names. Remove that and you should be good.


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Windows 10 will overwrite your GRUB, but you can simply recover it with a live CD. Boot from live CD and open a terminal after upgrading and run "sudo fdisk -l" and remember the device your system is installed on. Not the partitions but the whole disk. It is usually /dev/sda or /dev/sdb. Then run "grub-install ".


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Welcome to the community! Hopefully I'll be able to help you out with all of your questions. 1) I play games. Can I run Diablo II, Steam, and my AMD Catalyst/Gaming Evolved software in Ubuntu? (Yes, running Diablo II is that important...) Steam most definitely runs on Linux. As for individual steam games, you'll have to check their pages in the ...


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I had many times struggling with it till i fixed windows first then i have booted Ubuntu alongside windows, first it boots up to Ubuntu, but if you look into the boot screen options you can go to the windows section as well, but if you install it from within the windows section, then you get a small registration form where it asks to reboot and takes its ...


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I have installed win 7 normally, made 2 partition please make note its in MBR 100 mb system reserved 50 gigs for my win 7 Left rest as unallocated Now after the installation I rebooted the and booted with bootable ubuntu USB I am not able to see option “alongside” so selected something else Then coming on to Ubuntu partition (doesnt matter under ...


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Yes, but there are things you should be aware of. At least in the past, switching hardware for Windows has caused issues. That means you'd either always run Windows virtualized or always on metal. However, this is very rarely an issue with Ubuntu. I don't know what the situation is with Windows 10. So what you can do, is to have Windows on one drive and ...


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I am not sure exactly what you are asking so this may not be responsive, but it is certainly possible to run Windows in a virtual machine on an Ubuntu computer, or Ubuntu in a virtual machine on a Windows computer, or Ubuntu in a virtual machine on an Ubuntu computer, etc, etc. You do not need to repartition to run virtual machines. Nor are separate disk ...


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Try doing this manually, select 'something else' during install and create a partition to install into. So long as you ignore any NTFS partition you wont hurt Windows, it's not as scary as it first looks. Maybe this will get you further along. How to use manual partitioning during installation?


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No it isnt true u have to select the operating system at the begin of the boot of your computer thats all. That can help you: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WindowsDualBoot


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For temporary if you want to start then make bootable system of windows 7 and choose repair system->startup repair. This will automatically fix w7 startup


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You may have correctly installed Ubuntu on the second HDD, but most likely your BIOS is set to use the first HDD as the boot device. That's why you do not see the GRUB screen at all. You just simply need to change the boot order in the BIOS. Or if it is easier, you can swap the order of the disks, by swapping the SATA connectors on the motherboard.


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The 'hard drive' in this case is actually a file on your Windows filesystem, used by the VM. Your Linux installation will not be able to affect anything outside of that file, which it sees as a physical drive. You can go ahead and 'erase everything...' As for the second message, don't worry about it, for the reasons above. It's just a confirmation dialog.


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No it will not effect your windows 7 os. Because the hard drive is virtual, you cannot edit the real hard drive it is stored on. So you should erase the vm "hard drive".


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Well I found the answer to problem. It had to do with the power configuration in Windows 10. It's actually an issue that goes back to Windows 8 but I didn't know about it because I didn't have 8. I went from 7 to 10. Anyway, had to open up a command prompt, run as administrator and enter the following: powercfg /h off This disables all hibernate options, ...


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Windows 7 has its own boot manager which boots Windows, so when you install Windows 7 grub isn't avaible to load both operative systems, to solve this i'd use http://www.supergrubdisk.org/ , then you'll be able to get in ubuntu, upgrade your grub: sudo update-grub and this should fix your problem-


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Did you upgrade your grub properly? I'd use super grub disk to fix it. http://www.supergrubdisk.org/


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You can download this tool and play with it. It will help: type this in the terminal: sudo apt-get install alsa-tools-gui but you likely have a hardware problem. After installing this tool you have to see with of the applications in this collection, will work for you, and when you open an application you have to play around with it to see if it will ...



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