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0

I figured it out. Windows has a unique bootloader that unetbootin - designed for linux - doesn't correctly see and use. Used a friends computer and made a flash drive with rufus with no problem whatsoever. Thanks for being completely useless for three months.


0

Even I did face the same issue. The Ubuntu default network manager has some issues. I switched to new Network Manager WICD which solved my problem. sudo apt-get install wicd


0

That is one of the newer Intel Wifi Cards: it currently does not have native support--as far as I can tell. What you need is the right firmware. I have found the firmware for Centrino Wireless-N + WiMAX 6150 as well as brief instructions on the installation of firmware. Download the corresponding firmware tarball. (iwlwifi-6050-ucode-9.201.4.1.tgz) Unpack ...


0

How odd. It sees the wireless device, and even its connections, but won't connect. I've heard that a lot lately, but so far only about version 14.04 and 14.10. Maybe I should just be glad I'm still using 12.04? I suppose it could be that the default driver your wifi device is using isn't quite right. Generally speaking, if you are connected to the ...


0

The partitions look alright. I would put the boot loader on sdb though, because it's faster and that's where the operating systems reside anyway.


0

The solution was to install Linpus Linux first. Then it was possible to install Ubuntu and to see partitions on the disk without problems.


3

The easiest and cleanest way to setup Ubuntu in a virtual machine is to download the Ubuntu ISO files, and use VirtualBox to create a new machine. This ensures a clean installation, and is much, much smaller than an VMX download.


0

You need to boot an Ubuntu Live image from a DVD or USB drive, then use the chroot method to reinstall the bootloader. Follow these instructions and you should be good to go: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Grub2/Installing#via_ChRoot To write the Ubuntu ISO image to a bootable USB stick in Windows you can use Win32DiskImager ...


0

If you do not have it yet, install GRUB Customizer: $sudo install grub-customizer ...and make sure that GRUB can see both OS's. If it can, double-check the "General Settings" page. In the "Advanced Settings" check the values of GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT, GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET and GRUB_TIMEOUT. If GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT is greater than zero, then GRUB is ...


0

I'd imagine you will need a windows disc, start windows installer via the boot menu, and then run boot repair. I don't know if something like Ultimate boot cd or system rescue cd will work as I've never had a need to use them. BTW, its called dual boot not side-by-side. Apparently, it looks like you didn't do it correctly.


0

I don't claim to be expert interpreting the boot-repair reports, but I don't see a surviving windows partition, so I honestly don't think you have windows anymore. If it helps I can tell you a lot of things to make you feel better about that, and I can offer significant assistance helping you to set up WINE such that you will actually be able to run windows ...


0

if you are trying to put ubuntu and windows 7 on the same hard dis, it's a lot easier to install windows first and leave some free space on the drive. then install ubuntu. if you have already installed ubuntu it can be done if you have free space on the disk. if not you have to resize ubuntu to make some space using gparted. you have to use your ubuntu live ...


0

this problem can be caused by connected hard disk or flash or cd, if true remove it, if not probably your hard disk is corrupted or your boot manager files are missing, so you have to check your drives then you have to repair boot manager files using windows 7 recovery media.


1

Did you read that ? https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation It give you all the information you could need. And if you think it isn't detailed enough, just try "Install Ubuntu" on google and you will find all the tutorials you could dream of. It's possible to reinstall Windows after that, but you will need an installation CD and a licence. It's is ...


1

The best idea will be to use a boot repair disk, just download iso and burn it into USB drive, and it will do all the hard stuff itself for you :) more details at https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair EDIT: if you need direct steps: Download http://sourceforge.net/p/boot-repair-cd/home/Home/ burn it into USB using Universal USB installer (google ...


0

Can you access your windows 7? if you can, and you don't insist on repairing grub. You can use Easy BCD. Download the free version of program and install it on your windows 7. It can automatically find your GRUB2 options and add them to windows boot menu. It's very easy, you can figure it out. I've used it many times for similar situations. Works like a ...


0

Try this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVppdkOThCs It is an easy way to boot Ubuntu on an existing windows computer, to try, and very easy to remove it if you don't like it after trying it.


0

I actually just ran the live cd and installed ubuntu on my new harddrive with all my other hard drives plugged in. I used the advanced options to partition my empty hard drive and installed Ubuntu on it. It did the rest and grub allows me to boot into all os's I have installed.


0

For me, oddly, going back and then forward again seems to have fixed the problem. A little disconcerting considering it's dealing with your HDD partitions.


1

On installation, choose the Soomething else option to open the advanced partitioning tool. Make a separate partition for /boot (500 MB in size is enough): and another one for root: You can make a separate partition for /home for your data and settings and also one for swap if you want to use hibernation on Ubuntu. Before continuing to install, you ...


2

(a) For a dual boot machine, it is recommended that you install Windows first, with sufficient space for a blank partition, where Ubuntu would be installed. (b) In case you wish to have a Ubuntu based machine, install Ubuntu first, and then install Virtualbox. Inside virtualbox, install your legal copy of Windows.


0

i found the solution it was a spelling mistake i couldn't install libcap0.8-dev because it is libpcap0.8-dev not libcap0.8-dev also for anybody who faces the same problem u just have to install the following packages 1-sqlite3 2-libsqlite3-dev 3-libcap-dev 4-libpcap-dev with this code sudo apt-get install "package name" and it will probably work


0

The easiest procedure to get rid of the Windows 7 hibernation problem is to boot into Windows, click the start button, type cmd and right-click on the icon on the top of your menu, left-click on "Run as an administrator", enter the admin username/password or click "yes" to continue, and type powercfg.exe /hibernate off and all your Windows 7 hibernation ...


0

Most probably you will need to use GParted to create a partition for your Windows OS and set it as NTFS or FAT32 so Windows can recognize the partition where to install it.


1

You wouldn't boot a live system from GRUB, but rather from the BIOS' boot device selection menu. Microsoft gives an instruction on how to do this. It cuts down to these points: Press and old the volume down button and press the Power button Release the volume down button as the Surface logo shows up and it should automatically boot the USB stick. ...


0

If you are not comfortable with the partitioning you might try wubi. Check out this link Windows installer for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS onwards


1

On that screen, Click on SOMETHING ELSE. In the next screen, Click on Install Ubuntu alongside Microsoft Windows... Next Screen, Most likely you'll see one row showing /dev/sda (SDA is 1'st Hard Disk). VERY IMPORTANT, STEP highlight the free space row & only then Click on ADD button, enter how many GB you want for Linux. you will see 2 extra rows ...


-1

It is possible to dual boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu. Follow this link from ubunutu documentation NOTE : to avoid data loss Keep Important files backup


0

This is not a real solution! I moved my profile to my windows OS drive. Reset my Thunderbird profiles in windows and Ubuntu to point to the new profile location and it is working perfectly (though the windows OS drive have to be mounted). Still no idea why it is not working on my Data drive...


0

The answer that worked for me was from: How to add Windows 7 loader to GRUB? In short I had to open terminal and run: sudo update-grub Which then created a grub config file. After reboot I saw an option to load my Windows 7 or Ubuntu.


0

Yes you can triple boot Windows 7, Windows 8 and Ubuntu provided you have enough space for three OS. You have to create separate partition for Windows 7 in the unallocated space along with the remaining space available in the hard disk. If no space is available then you have to delete an existing partition to install Windows 7.


-1

Your installation medium is on /dev/sda2. You will not be able to create, delete, or resize partitions on this disk, but you may be able to install to existing partitions there


0

Are you sure you didn't accidentally format the Windows 7 partition? Cause If Ubuntu, during the installation, didn't recognize the Windows 7 partition, so it doesn't exist. => Windows 7/8/2012 is installed in the MBR of /dev/sda. Above partition could refer to System Reserved by windows and it is 100 MB parition. So access to your Ubuntu, open ...


0

Yes, Install windows 7 first and then install Linux. You as a gamer I recommend the distro called Net-Runner http://www.netrunner-os.com/ This distro came with many apps focusing in gaming such as Steam, Screen recording, video editing. But you can also use Ubuntu, it is the most common. according with the Wine HQ (http://www.winehq.org) all the listed ...


1

Theoretically, yes. There is a process called Dual Booting that allows you to run both OSes side by side. There should be an install option in the installer menu, but there are many questions about that. Regarding Ubuntu's ability to run those games, the answer is not natively. You can install WINE and possibly run those apps. I have taken the liberty of ...


0

Is ubuntu is your primary operating system.Who the partition of your hard disk.If all three partition are logical then you have to remove ubuntu first the install windows .Upload the $sudo parted -i So we can tell you step by step how to go through dual booting your computer.


0

I don't see the unallocated space. But yes, using parted to move your extended partition boundaries and then to recover the partitions inside. note where they are supposed to be.


0

Yes, you should be able to resize your extended partition (just sda4) to include free space on either side of it (adjacent to it), after shrinking/resizing sda3. An extended partition can hold many other partitions, it's like a container for "more than just 4" partitions. I think if you didn't already have an extended partition you would have to delete one ...


0

You have 4 primary partions used .. three ntfs and one extended(extendable). So yes, partion 3 as extended would have been nice. Now, resizing one of the ntfs would leave you with empty space .. if it's adjacent to your extended partition, you could then resize that.


0

Just two commands at the terminal, and you must be done. sudo os-prober sudo update-grub and just reboot your system now.


0

Make sure you dont have any data on hard drive(backup to some other place like external harddrive) before you follow this method: I suggest to make boot-able DVD of windows first(you can buy a cheap DVD of 4.4GB from nearest store). link on how to burn DVD with ISO here You can try downloading Ubuntu ISO using transmission .i.e. torrent link here make ...


2

You cannot unmount the partition of the system you're running. If you want to modify the partition (like shrinking it), you have to boot a live USB or live DVD and use gparted on your system partition.


0

based on the clarifications you provided, this partition is a system partition, so you can not unmount using umount, only the system is able to umount while shutting down! for any non-system partition, you can use Gparted (available in software center) and choose the partition you want to unmount and right-click it then choose unmount NOTE : gparted is a ...


0

Create an unallocated partition for installation of the windows and try. Try Gparted to reallocating the partitions.


0

Unfortunately, unetbootin does not support Windows ISOs. To create a bootable Windows USB from Ubuntu, you need to use winusb. Run the below commands on terminal to install WinUSB. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:colingille/freshlight sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install winusb


0

boot in to ubuntu and make windows7 bootable pendrive. you need windows7 iso image for this. open Ubuntu software center and install unetbootin. then use unetbootin to burn iso into pendrive ( this link explains how to burn iso in windows but same applies in ubuntu). then boot into pendrive by pressing F12(may be F8 or F2 in some) in most computers. Then ...


0

You can use winusb to create a bootable USB drive. To install on Ubuntu 14.04 sudo add-apt-repository ppa:colingille/freshlight sudo sh -c "sed -i 's/trusty/saucy/g' /etc/apt/sources.list.d/colingille-freshlight-trusty.list" sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install winusb


0

Both possibilities (Use BIOS boot order / Don't use BIOS) have their advantages/disadvantages. Using BIOS Advantages Windows doesn't even know that Ubuntu is there. Ubuntu gets an entire HDD to itself Easier to delete Windows once you've used a professional OS. ;-) Disadvantages You have to remember to press the button! ;-) No BIOS Advantages ...


0

It's perfectly safe to install Ubuntu alongside Windows on a separate hard drive. Once installed you should not have to change any BIOS settings, instead Ubuntu will now be an option available to you in the Windows Boot Loader. You'll just have to select either load Windows or load Ubuntu from a menu. The easiest method to achieve a dual boot is to install ...


0

I would do a new partitioning, removing mint partition and creating your new Ubuntu partitions. At the end of the installation grub will identify your windows and your new Ubuntu and add the entries for both of them. I would go for some 30 Gb for /, 8 Gb for swap and the remaining for /home, unless you're a developer and you want to install lots of thing in ...



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