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The following is from one of my VM's. Your mac address and address lines will/ might be different: <interface type='bridge'> <mac address='52:54:00:c1:f1:b8'/> <source bridge='br0'/> <model type='virtio'/> <address type='pci' domain='0x0000' bus='0x00' slot='0x03' function='0x0'/> ...


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For future reference, code samples should be entered with four spaces preceding each line. Using carats (>) at the start of the line is used for quoting content, and does not preserve critical code formatting. I've fixed your question so it's properly formatted. See here for more on formatting features on this site. As to your question, there are two ...


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You can actually try ubuntu without actually installing it, but you need a USB flash drive withat least 1GB of space to have it on. Here is a good tutorial on how to set it up. After you have a LiveUSB created you just reboot the computer with the flash drive still connected. you might have to go into BIOS and give boot priority to the flash drive. Then ...


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First off, make sure you backup everything you've got on the Windows partitions. I would then suggest trying gparted. It might let you remove the existing Windows partitions and expand the Ubuntu partitions without losing any data (depending on how the partitions are laid out).


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use sudo cfdisk If you dont know how to use cfdisk this might help


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Did you previously had windows 8 installed? In windows you can run -> msconfig and check what are the boot settings. Maybe you still have old boot settings, or just the name is incorrect. If so, just edit them (make sure you don't delete the correct one as it will make booting issues). If you never had windows 8 installed, you don't have to worry about the ...


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Seems, GRUB is unable to Locate your Windows & Partition. I presume, that you are able to boot in Ubuntu, If so; Here's what you should do, Start Ubuntu Open terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) Type the command sudo update-grub Type your password when asked You should see similar output rawbot@rawbot-HP-Pavilion-dv4-Notebook-PC:~$ sudo update-grub [sudo] ...


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According to the boot-repair log, it appears that your Windows partitions had been removed, probably when you reinstalled Ubuntu. At this point, there's not much hope for your data, but there are a few options you can try, if you're using a HDD. Your chances decrease the more you write to the disk (e.g. booting up Ubuntu), so shut down your computer ...


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As far as I know, you should start with windows, and after that, install Ubuntu. Ubuntu needs 2 partitions: one EXT4 at least 8 GB, and one swap at least 8 Gb. Hope it will help.


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I would suggest a slightly different approach. Create a separate partition in Windows (e.g. drive D:) and store all of your data files (e.g. documents, pictures, etc.) in that partition. Mount the data partition in Ubuntu but do not mount the main Windows partition. Now, all your data files will be accessible to both operating systems, but Ubuntu won't be ...


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You need Ext2fsd these are drivers for linux partition on windows. The Ext2 Volume Manager will allows you to define mount points for your Linux partitions and there are lot of options. Mark it for auto start while installing the program. Otherwise start service manually in Ext2 Volume Manager.In Tools –> Service Management and start the Ext2Fsd service and ...


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You can "remove" from yourself the temptation of modifying Windows files by hiding them via .hidden files. Just place a file with name .hidden in the directory where the files you want to protect are located and put a file or directory name in each line. These files will be hidden from file managers (except dolphin I think) and the terminal (unless you put ...


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There was a recent post on SuperSite for Windows that discussed how to get a clean ISO for Windows 7. http://winsupersite.com/windows-7/legally-download-clean-windows-7-iso-directly-microsoft Hopefully that will get you what you need. As an aside, you could boot in to linux from a USB drive and there are some recovery tools that you could use to recover ...


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I'm running Windows 8.1 and Ubuntu 14.10, but I got the same error message when I was trying to install Ubuntu. The error occurs because your computer has Windows set as the default OS, so every time you boot your computer it tries to go into Windows no matter what. It might be a little different for you, but I had to turn off fast boot, make Windows no ...


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upon installing Ubuntu it will detect that you have another OS on your hard drive and will ask you weather you want to run Ubuntu along side with it or remove it and install Ubuntu. It will also allow you choose the suitable size for your Ubuntu. Just make sure that you know how much your C drive -in windows- needs in order not to "harm" it.


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You do not need wine. Someone reverse engineered SDM and ported a repo to github. xSDM The git manual gives most details, and provides a link to his site that gives comprehensive instructions. I have successfully used it to download Windows Server 2012 R2 from my DreamSpark student account while using Trusty Tahr. Note: The large file sizes of most ...


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You seem to have not just only a GPT but also a UEFI installation. In that case there will be no overwritten MBR bootloader, which is what the link in your question is mostly about. I'm pretty sure that machine shipped with Windows 8, so you should have followed the instructions in my answer on How to use manual partitioning during installation? and kept ...


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Before starting please backup your files, because re-sizing and creating partition can lead to loss of data. After that Open Gparted. Select the disk with largest amount of free space and click on "Move/Resize the selected partition" choose how much space you want to allocate to your windows 7 installation. When you are satisfied click on Resize/Move. ...


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The installation of Windows 7 in dual boot has been unambiguously described in the link that you have mentioned in your question. If you want to know how GParted works, check the following steps: To launch gParted you may use either of the methods: the Dash (Ubuntu 11.04 and next): click the Ubuntu logo in the top-left corner of the screen, then type ...


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You just need a free space on hard disk, you can manage partition for your windows 7 OS from the windows OS installer. Use Disks (it's an application) to make a partiton with free space. Notice that you cannot install Win 7 on GPT formatted disks.


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There is a not a really good way to "cut the fat" off of windows. Since it's not open source, you can't really change anything. If I were you, it would allocate about 60-80GBs to windows, since it is a much larger intall, and have the rest of the space for Kubuntu. As far as the activation key goes, that is only good on one computer (more specifically, it ...


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Judging from your grub.cfg file, it looks like you should be seeing three entries for Windows: Windows UEFI bootmgfw.efi Windows Boot UEFI loader Windows Boot Manager (on /dev/sdc1) Please clarify which of those you've tried, and what the result is for each of them. In some cases, one option will work but others won't, in which case the appropriate thing ...


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I got the same problem and solve by: Step 1. remove efi partition when "where do you want install windows" window come out. In my case is partition 6. Step 2. Chose the partition where I want install windows After that windows will overwrite grub from hdd which means cant boot ubuntu. If you need ubuntu: Step 3: fix grub by boot-repair, see step 7 in ...


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It sounds like the ESP wasn't mounted at S:. Did you get any errors with the mountvol command earlier in the procedure? If so, you should correct those errors. As an alternative, consider downloading the USB flash drive or CD-R version of rEFInd and booting with it. If you can get into Ubuntu in that way, you can install the Debian package or PPA, which ...


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There's nothing special about an installation to a secondary drive. No need to fiddle with Windows or install to the primary drive first. I have Windows on a hard disk drive and Ubuntu on a solid state drive as you intend. Perform a regular installation of Ubuntu, choose the option ”Something Else”, select the new drive and partition and format it to your ...


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The Ubuntu installer will recognize the drive as long as it's properly connected. You can build the necessary partitions to run Ubuntu fully on the SSD. So you don't have to do anything in Windows as long as it's properly connected. I have a similar setup but on a tower PC. Be aware that you have to create some 4 different partitions on that SSD for the ...


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I figured it out! UEFI was enabled on my motherboard, I was using http://www.pendrivelinux.com/, which apparently didn’t boot me as UEFI. Using Rufus worked, then i had to use recommended boot repair, and afterwards use windows boot repair to get windows working as well!


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This is really a Windows issue, not an Ubuntu issue, but it does interact with Ubuntu, so it merits an answer. Your first task is to figure out your Ubuntu boot mode. If the directory /sys/firmware/efi is present, you're booting Ubuntu in EFI mode. This is the best possibility for overcoming your problem. If that directory is not present, then you're almost ...


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How to get your laptop to boot the cd in bios mode is specific to your model of laptop: you will have to read the manual or contact the manufacturer about that. However, when installing Ubuntu along side an existing bios booting Windows install, it will automatically stick with bios booting even though the installer itself is booted in UEFI mode.


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You have to go into the bios to enable uefi. Hit delete or f12 or something to get into the bios. From there you'll need to find the setting to enable UEFI.


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check if the windows DVD is bootable or not by testing it on other computer on most computers you can select the boot device by clicking the F12 key during boot and select the desired boot device also would recommend using a USB for installation as DVD often get scratches and may fail to install some files during installation


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Check whether the DVD is working by playing a movie or music. If ok, then proceed as follows. Go to bios set up. Press 'Del' repeatedly to start bios set up at boot time. change boot sequence to DVD drive and then hardisk If you install win xx, you are likely to lose all the ubuntu data as windows will remove the ubuntu boot info. Before doing anything, do ...


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When you make your VirtualBox VM, make sure that the Hard Drive is set to SATA Slot 0, or IDE Slot 0, that may be causing this. Also install using the defaults from the CD, and it should not have a problem. If it says "No Root System", that means you need to go to the partition part of the installer and make a root partition SLASH / For example: / <-- ...


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Open the Windows disk utility and make sure that it is a "basic disk". If you create more than 4 primary partitions, it automatically converts to "dynamic disk", which Ubuntu doesn't support. You will need to remove some partitions to get it back down to 4 in order to convert it back to a basic disk.


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well by "erase and use the entire disk" it means the virtual hard disk created before proceeding with the installation xD not the Hos Computer actual HD ! Thanks to http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/130922-linux-install-windows-7-virtual-machine-using-virtualbox.html !(http://i.imgur.com/RHIDZb3.png?1)


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If you've booted from a live USB/CD and still see the key icon, check if you have mounted the partition. That could have easily been done if you clicked one of the drive icons from the desktop to check to see what was on the drives. Unmount those drives by rick clicking on them and choosing "Unmount".


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The suggested actions at the bottom of the Boot-Repair script actually look like the right thing to do here, but you said it got stuck, so we'll need to look for a manual solution. The Grub boot loader appears to be alive and well, but the boot menu has no entries, so you'll need to follow the instructions of this answer to repopulate it. Check the output ...


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The headers for the current running kernel were not found. If the following module compilation fails then this could be the reason. Building the shsared folder support module ... fail! That gives a clue. Install the headers for your kernel version: sudo apt-get install linux-headers-`uname -r`


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I found an hack for this problem, I just took the Guest additions of latest VirtualBox and I installed it.It solved all my problems. :) Thank you


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From there, do you know how I could boot from the virtual CD? You can not. A virtual CD is not intended for installing operating systems. 2 options: You can install from a partition by putting the ISO on that partition and when grub boots start from that ISO. See How to mount image.iso and create an option in Grub to install? for details on that. ...


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You don't need to partition your hard drive and leave unallocated space. Just choose install ubuntu alongside windows option and then set the amount of space you want for ubuntu using the slider. Try downloading grub customiser to help with the grub problems you are facing.


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OK, I'm not extremely familiar with Windows, but as a general techie I'll give my two cents. I'll bet your problem is that the card/connection is configured to connect to some weird kind of DHCP server, based on the "Autoconfiguration IP address". After a simple Google search, one of the first results was this: ...


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Ordinarily, each filesystem partition that you want to access in Linux has a unique mount point; you can't simultaneously mount two partitions at root (/). Furthermore, you can't use an NTFS volume as your Linux root (/) filesystem. If you want to access your Windows partition from Linux, you must give it some other mount point, such as /mnt/windows. Because ...


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Try downgrading (Some issues have been addressed with the newer versions of VBox), make sure the versions correlate with the correct (Working) versions of VBox.


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Use your Ubuntu CD Live and launch a terminal console where you are going to type these commands: sudo su [Enter] gparted [Enter] Take a picture of gparted and post the link to the image (for privileges reasons in this forum you can not include an image directly in your post). We will see if you still have a Windows 7 partition in your hard disk drive. If ...


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Try to press f9 Immediately on boot...It would take you to the EFI Bios boot screen, See if "OS Boot Manager" is an option there, and if it boots. There is also the option of Manually selecting an EFI file Use it to browse the EFI System Partition to locate the EFI files with the .EFI extension and try to boot from it.


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Since the automatic ways aren't working, I tried googling for "manually add windows to grub" and found this. The linked answer suggests the following: The first step is to edit /etc/grub.d/40_custom (using SUDO) and add the following lines to the bottom of the file: menuentry ‘Windows 7′ { set root='(hd0,msdos2)’ chainloader +1 } Then running sudo ...


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1. Re-install Windows 7 by re-partitioning your whole hard disk, which means delete and re-create all partitions. Then select an specific partition for Windows 7 installation. After that, use any partition manager (EaseUS Partition Manager) and convert all your partitions to LOGICAL, except the partition where you installed Windows 7 (it should be PRIMARY) ...


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You can use BIOS to select other HDD as primary, then install Ubuntu on it. Then from BIOS you can easily switch in between HDDs and boot into Windows or linux


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You can try Unetbootin or LinuxLive. Just try sometimes other don't work but these work. http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/ http://www.linuxliveusb.com/



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