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Sure, it is certainly possible using GParted (Ubuntu) and Disk Management (Windows). However, pay attention! If you want to reduce a Windows partition, the best thing is to do this from Windows. Preconditions Make a backup of all important stuffs!! Take a look at your partitions and how you want to resize them. Simply put, if you have 3 close partitions, ...


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Yes it is. First you are going to want to use GParted to shrink the Ubuntu Partition and make the Windows partition bigger. GPARTED DOES WARN YOU THAT THERE IS A CHANCE OF DATA LOSS IF DONE INCORRECTLY. First install UNetBootin on your ubuntu distro. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:gezakovacs/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install unetbootin Then ...


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To dual-booting between Windows 8 and Windows 7 you must install the older OS first, make room for the second OS, and then install the newer OS. Once Windows 8 is installed, you’ll find a new boot menu that appears when the PC starts up. You must use this menu to pick between the Microsoft OSes installed on the PC.


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I am not sure how you came to this situation. You have 2 primary partitions and 1 extended partition. These are partition 1, 2 and 0 respectively. Inside the extended partition 0 (70GB) you have 2 logical partitions. Partition 3 (NTSF D: 41GB) and Partition 4 (ext4 mounted as / for Ubuntu 29GB). You cannot delete the extended partition without deleting ...


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@oldfred Your links were very useful. I've opted for using the overwrite strategy from Dual boot Win 8 / Ubuntu loads only Win (plan B). Now I can fool my firmware and make it boot using GRUB instead of Windows Boot Manager, and select between Windows and Ubuntu from there. I only hope someday there will be a definitive way to solve this without any ...


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If you locate the disk application in Ubuntu (either search in the menu or download if necessary in the app store or Synaptic package manager), it will display the format of your current partition, from there you can select to allow the largest disk within your partition to boot windows NFTS (it is imperative you choose this boot format) and once you change ...


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Try dd command. The dd command copies a file, converting the format of the data in the process, according to the operands specified. Operands: if=FILE -- Read from file instead of stdin. of=FILE -- Write to file instead of stdout bs=BYTES -- Read and write bytes at a time. count=BLOCKS -- Copy only input blocks. sync -- Use synchronized I/O for ...


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if you haven't done anything with the partition then it will work. during the boot process, after the loading of the bios keep holding SHIFT key and this will show the grub menu and choose the option


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have you tried changing the boot options and changing around the boot options? I had and issue a while back where my computer would only boot into windows 7 and the grub was broken and I need to select another boot option to run ubuntu, until I fixed the issue


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Test this: Insert the Windows 7 installation disc into the DVD drive and restart the computer. If prompted, press any key to boot from the Windows 7 installation DVD. Select your language preferences and click on Next. Click on Repair your computer. Select which operating system you want to restore and the click on Next. If Windows 7 is not listed here, ...


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Maybe izx's answer is better for Windows 7, but if you want to open and download any .sdx file with the recent SDM in Ubuntu, you need the following steps and commands: Download your .sdx file with your browser. apt-get install wine apt-get install winetricks wget e5.onthehub.com/Static/Installers/SDM_EN.msi wine msiexec /i SDM_EN.msi Choose directory ...


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its called wine you get it by sudo apt-get install wine you will need to have the 32 bit library's then you do sudo wine windowsexe.exe


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You can try this following steps as I use this and it fix the problem. 1) Insert Windows 7 CD or make your USB bootable with Windows 7. 2) On the first page, just click Install. 3) And then, click Repair your computer. (this option is on the below part) 4) Click Next on the prompted message and then choose command prompt. 5) In the command prompt, type ...


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Create the ISO file from your current Linux OS so that even if you format your whole HDD, you still can recover your files and data. After you created the ISO file, format the whole HDD again. Then this time, make sure to have enough partition spaces. Then install the Windows first, then install the Linux the main reason is if you install Windows first, ...


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if you want to use Linux, try Lubuntu because lxde is really a light weight, I have 8GB RAM but I only use lxde and don't use Unity. 1GB is really low to run Unity. And if you use Windows XP is better unless you increase your RAM. Windows 7 will consume a lot :)


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Follow the instructions provided with your Windows 7 installation disc. If you have no desire to keep Ubuntu, then it does not matter what was on the drive beforehand.


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I had this problem before. I was not able to get help no matter how much I perused the internet. The only way that I was able to save my data and restore the OS's was to pull the internal hard drive, put it in another computer, and manually pull the important files that I needed. If it is a program that you are trying to save, I have no experience in this. I ...


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Tried with ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-i386.iso. Installed properly but 32-bit. I don't have any clue why it's not installed with ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-amd64.iso.


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Linux in general can run Windows software with varying degrees of success depending on exactly which software it is. This is done with a special Linux program called WINE. See the different versions listed on that link. "Crossover" is a commercial variant of WINE and tends to get improvements first and they are then folded into WINE over time. Crossover ...


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Assuming you have already deleted all partitions related to Ubuntu (including grub). You will need to boot the computer with a Windows recovery USB. After booting with the USB you can follow the attached guide (Link 1) to help you in fixing the boot process. Hope that helps fix your problem. Also, next time please look in a Windows related source for Windows ...


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Test this: Start up your computer with the USB or DVD Windows 8 recovery media in the system. When the computer boots off the recovery media, pick the Troubleshoot option. Then choose Advanced Options. and head on over to the Command Prompt. The computer should reboot and then ask you for the account. Click your account to continue. Then login to get ...


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You've pretty much whittled yourself down to a network boot install then. Here's a good resource. https://help.ubuntu.com/12.04/installation-guide/i386/install-tftp.html I'll let others expand on this answer if they like.


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Boot into Ubuntu or Mint using a live disk and repair grub. this involves some mounting and running grub-install. see this post: http://howtoubuntu.org/how-to-repair-restore-reinstall-grub-2-with-a-ubuntu-live-cd


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try entering ubuntu, open the terminal and type "sudo update-grub", maybe after this you can see windows on your boot menu.


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You need to boot from a live DVD, set up an internet connection, open a terminal and download the script. After downloading the script into a ~/Downloads directory you can use... sudo ~/Downloads/bootinfoscript This will create a RESULTS.txt in the same directory holding all the information the script collected. Source bootscript help (link has more ...


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Rexoanimation solved the problem and explained the solution in an edit: Disk utility is called: Disks - had to search for it.


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To restore the Windows bootloader you will need your Windows 7 installation disc and follow these: instructions. After doing that you should expect to boot right into Windows without a GRUB prompt. Since you installed using WUBI that should be all you need to do. If you had installed Ubuntu to its own partition then you would use the: disk partition tool ...


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Try using EasyBCD. Use EasyBCD to delete the Ubuntu Entry. Ubuntu recently messed up my Uefi boot on my system and i wont be trying it anymore.


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Use the manual installation. Select the partition on which you want to install Ubuntu, Create partition as ext4 and mount point should be : /. Be careful when choosing the partition, you don't want to wipe your Windows install ! After everything is finished whenever you reboot, GRUB should appear and let you choose on which OS to boot. P.S.: You can add a ...


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That's normal. To increase download speed, Wubi downloads the torrent file, but here is the interesting part: Wubi IS it's own BitTorrent client. That gives faster downloads.


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Congratulation to getting rid of dual boot, that is a vice decision. Since I will no longer have a dual-boot, how do I create my partitions such that they use my entire harddrive? Ubuntu installation allows you to use your whole hardrive and it will erase it fully and create partitions for you. If you decided to do so you can also manually alter the ...


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Check some pages http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/bios_manufacturer.htm http://pcsupport.about.com/od/fixtheproblem/a/biosaccess_mb.htm $SEARCH_ENGINE search for bios keys or similar and check the different key combinations (a lot more than ESC and F2 (although there're the most popular)). If you don't know your mainboard manufacturer and/or type, try ...


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The reason Windows cannot see your Linux partition is because Windows has limitations in what partitions it can see. It cannot read that your partition is there, so it thinks it is blank space. The reason you booted to Windows automatically is because Windows over-rid your grub boot loader. You can fix this by booting into your Ubuntu install disc/USB and ...


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Ok, are you IN Ubuntu when trying to install it or are you using the Windows EXE to install it in Windows? If you are using one or the other try using the other option.


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I think you are trying to fix the wrong issue. The issue might not be GRUB, but the EFI loader and probably a crippled firmware. Secure Boot itself works fine. Grub works fine too. First, back up the affected files. Then copy PreLoader.efi to \EFI\BOOT\BOOTX64.efi, copy HashTool.efi to the same directory, copy a binary of a loader like gummmiboot to ...


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At the moment, the simplest thing that can be done is delete the D: partition (not format it). Either using GParted or the Windows Disk Management tool. This will create unused space, which the installer can go ahead and use.


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*I formated my drive D in windows 7 to install ubuntu on this drive. To clarify, is that partition currently unallocated space? Usually you need to shrink your windows partition before installing to provide enough free space for the new install. You might need to defragment your hard drive before doing so because linux will need a contiguous block of ...


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Well, you can try a few tools if you have spare discs around(not sure if live usb's would work). I've had issues with this many times, make sure your BIOS is also set to boot from the right place (some more advanced ones will even let you choose the OS.) Also make sure you're NOT using UEFI if possible. It causes more issues with live CDs and Linux than I ...


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Adding an answer here so that I can mark it as solved. Everything worked after I added file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777 to the mount line. chown just gave me permission denied errors.


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After you boot with USB, you need to mount the / partion (the easiest way is using nautilus) and use chroot sudo chroot /media/ubuntu/drivename Then you can issue the grub update sudo grub-install /dev/sda4 sudo update-grub


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The recommended utility for burning a bootable image is the univeral USB installer (referenced by http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/create-a-usb-stick-on-windows). I've tried and failed with Rufus before.


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Download win32diskimager from here Run it in Windows, and browse to your Ubuntu installation image (You may have to change the "file type" drop-down from *.img to All files .) Select your USB key from the "Device" drop-down Hit "Write" (You will be warned about possible corruption when writing to a physical device, proceed if you wish though I have ...


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i had this problem before, if you had windows 8 installed previously maybe is a GPT data left behind by it, try booting ubuntu in "Try Ubuntu without installing it" mode then open the terminal and type "sudo gdisk /dev/sdx" (change /dev/sdx for the proper access to you disk, use gparted to know which "/dev/" is in case you have doubts) then press "x" to ...


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@zwgrad09, follow this link to install winusb. winusb is currently not available for Ubuntu 14.04. Follow the instructions in this link and this should install WinUSB successfully and fix the dependency errors too. Ensure that you install the 32 or 64 but accordingly. http://www.sysads.co.uk/2014/05/install-winusb-ubuntu-14-04/


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I managed to minsmod linux by doing the following: enter commands in grub shell insmod linux linux /casper/vmlinuz boot=casper initrd /casper/initrd.lz boot double click the "Install Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS" icon on the desktop Now my original question is solved, I am in the installer interface. (However now I have a second problem: no partitions are ...


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In Ubuntu, try running sudo update-grub. Hopefully, it will find the second hdd, and detect the Windows installation there. If successful, you should see Grub menu on boot with options to select from.


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A boot entry is registered in the MBR for a partition. A partition can only have one purpose, it is either a operating system or something else. It cannot be two operating systems at the same time. Imagine if you had two operating systems on one partition, which one should the MBR call? The first or the last? So in short, you actually start a partition (via ...


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Boot from a live system, and use the gpart utility to scan for file systems.


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Try to do a BIOS unlock, you might be able to choose which bootloader is default from each drive. In other words BIOS unlock allows you to set BBS priorities for each drive. Even for multiple OSs in your external USB flash drive should show up. Also you will have to disable Secure Boot permanently if you do the BIOS update as it will break your current GRUB ...


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Does the Windows Boot Manager option in the firmware still boot Windows? There are some bkp-prefixed files, that shouldn't exist in EFI/Microsoft, leading me to believe this is another case of boot-repair bringing more confusion to UEFI setups than necessary. Backup the whole data on the partition, copy the bkp files back to where they should be (just ...



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