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7

Here your problem command number 8: rm ~/ .config/vlc.old What did you do here? When a space exists between a path the command consider it another option, what i mean in the aboce command you ask system to delete all files under your home ~/ and delete the folder .config/vlc.old. The correct command have to be like that: rm ~/.config/vlc.old For ...


5

Ok, so based on what I have learned from here, I am trying a new approach, using ACPI. Create a script, for pausing and unpausing VLC: sudo touch /etc/acpi/headphone_jack.sh sudo chmod +x /etc/acpi/headphone_jack.sh and place the following on this file: _pid=`pgrep vlc` _pid="${_pid% *}" DBUS_SESSION_BUS_ADDRESS=`grep -z DBUS_SESSION_BUS_ADDRESS ...


3

You can do that using nautilus-action-Configuration-Tool Install the tool using using sudo apt-get install nautilus-action After that close all the open nautilus instances nautilus -q Open nautilus-action-Configuration-Tool. Then click on add new action button and name your action. Click the Command tab and enter the command vlc --one-instance You ...


3

First Method: Create a new script called add-to-vlc inside the directory ~/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts Add this to the file: #!/bin/bash for File in "$@" do if [ -d "$File" ]; then zenity --error --text="'$File' is a directory." exit fi done vlc --one-instance "$File" Give permissions to the file: chmod +x add-to-vlc Now restart nautilus: nautilus -q ...


2

If you have Zeitgeist daemon running on your system, it should save some helpful info to ~/.local/share/recently-used.xbel file. Zeitgeist monitors access to files on disk, so it should know your most recently played video file. Unfortunately the files are not sorted by file access, but the database contains that information too, so you can grep all data you ...


2

Use the command : vlc --version Most of the programs (i have used) provide their version by the --version option. Also you should check the man page of the commands to get details idea about them. EDIT : There are many ways to check where a binary file is stored, vlc in this case : type -a vlc command -v vlc which vlc


2

simply start this command apt-cache policy vlc Sample output vlc: Installed: 2.2.0-1 Candidate: 2.2.0-1 Version table: *** 2.2.0-1 0 500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ vivid/universe amd64 Packages 100 /var/lib/dpkg/status From man apt-cache policy [pkg...] policy is meant to help debug issues relating to the ...


2

You can check version of an installed Ubuntu package by running dpkg -l | grep <package_name> dpkg -l | grep vlc It will give you versions of vlc-related packages. To get path to vlc binary run which vlc But in Ubuntu it is very rarely needed to know where the binaries are located, if they are installed using dpkg or apt.


2

Also other commands that can be found within different SE websites: apt-show-versions vlc But it has to be installed sudo apt-get install apt-show-versions then it will output for example: vlc:i386/trusty 2.2.1~trusty uptodate Using aptitude: aptitude versions vlc Will output the complete list/tree of packages related to vlc and the installed ones ...


2

For Ubuntu 14.04 you can install VLC 2.2.1 using this ppa. Run sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mc3man/trusty-media sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install vlc vlc-plugin-* In Ubuntu 15.04 VLC is already version 2.2.0.


1

You can change your apt-cache-path temporarily to a specific folder and download your package: sudo apt-get -o dir::cache::archives="/new/cache/is/here" --download-only install vlc If vlc is already installed: sudo apt-get clean sudo apt-get -o dir::cache::archives="/new/cache/is/here" --download-only --reinstall install vlc or you can use apt-offline ...


1

As per your question. I understand that the songs are in partition meant for Windows. Please check whether the Windows partition is listed in mounted partitions using the command: df -h In the case of ubuntu 14.04, by default user needs to enter sudo password to mount windows partition. Or else you can add an entry in /etc/fstab at the end of the file. ...


1

open the terminal and type the following command type vlc command also includes the word 'type' This gives you from where it was called . For vlc version do vlc --version


1

You can skin VLC. Here's a link for skins: http://www.videolan.org/vlc/skins.php The skins go in ~/.local/share/vlc/skins2 . Hope this helps!



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