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... with an update to VBox 5.0.24 r108355 my "pointing device" setting in the "motherboard" tab changed to "USB tablet" ... I changed it back to PS/2 mouse and everything was fine again ... host: windows 10 guest: ubuntu 14.04


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In case somebody bumps to this in the future. It may be that the required packages are not among dependencies. In my case, running through the terminal throws: WARNING: The character device /dev/vboxdrv does not exist. . Installing virtualbox-dkms solved my problem. sudo apt-get install virtualbox-dkms


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Yes, "sata" device is probed first, but you can change the boot device either "hand-off" with: -boot order=c or by manual selection with: -boot menu=on Both option can be used thogether: -boot order=c,menu=on


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ssh to login and run commands scp to copy files Can also use sftp to copy files previous question and answers on scp Using scp to copy files from remote to home machine A bit more advanced If you need to run commands or programs that will take a while to run and you don't want to disconnect your session - You could use screen, tmux or byobu.


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Install the ssh server on the remote machine if it isn't already installed. (requires package openssh-server on remote machine, to get the remote machine set up, follow this guide: Link) Then use the command from your computer, where "john" is the username of the user you want to log into the remote machine with, and "1.2.3.4" is that machines ip. ssh john@...


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The easiest thing to do would be to install the version of Virtualbox that is included in the Ubuntu software repositories. In general, this is preferred over installing a downloaded version (unless you need special features that the version in the software repos doesn't offer). The version of Virtualbox in the Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial) repos is 5.0.18-1. First,...


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Run: sudo /sbin/rcvboxdrv setup sudo apt -f install And if that dosen't work: sudo /etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup


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After reading the --location section in the man pages for virt-install, it looks like one should still be able to use location to specify the path to an ISO image, it doesn't work for me. Luckily it gave some examples, of which there was this one listed for Ubuntu: http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/wily/main/installer-amd64/ Using that worked for ...


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Unfortunately using VMware vCenter Converter is applicable just for server administrators. As I remember from Vmware documentation, vCenter Converter(linux version) needs four running system including Vmware ESX Server which itself needs at least 8GB of physical memory. Here I explain another way for those who have Windows OS beside the linux OS on the same ...


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The main problem is that the virtual disk you have created is not formatted, it is just a raw disk without a partition table. Another issue is that you selected the format qcow2 and created an .img file. You have to execute this command : qemu-img create -f qcow2 ubuntu.qcow2 20G. Download the latest stable version of GParted Live | Direct download link ->...


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For a novice it might be the most efficient to just download a preconfigured VB-Image. In any case, it is a definite time-saver. Check http://www.osboxes.org/ubuntu/ p.s. Don't forget to install virtualbox extension pack on the host and guest-additions inside of the guest.


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It is asking where your Ubuntu ISO is. If you have not downloaded it: 32-bit Ubuntu 16.04: http://releases.ubuntu.com/16.04/ubuntu-16.04-desktop-i386.iso 64-bit Ubuntu 16.04: http://releases.ubuntu.com/16.04/ubuntu-16.04-desktop-amd64.iso Then select the file. :)


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Virtual machine manager is built on top of libvirt. If you are using gnome as a DE, there is a gnome application named gnome-boxes that is also built on top of libvirt and maybe it is worth checking out. https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Boxes http://www.howtogeek.com/213922/easily-create-kvm-virtual-machines-on-linux-with-gnome-boxes/


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The solution is to: Install Guest additions on guest system (Windows) Do not install Guest additions on host system (Ubuntu) Add user to vboxsf group: sudo usermod -g vboxsf username Note: -g will set the primary group of the user to vboxsf (REPLACING whatever default group she belongs to, and changing all files created with it to vboxsf). "-G" will ...


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I did: sudo apt-get purge xen* It select all packages related to xen, so It just worked.


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QEMU QEMU is a generic and open source machine emulator and virtualizer. When used as a machine emulator, QEMU can run OSes and programs made for one machine (e.g. an ARM board) on a different machine (e.g. your own PC). By using dynamic translation, it achieves very good performance. When used as a virtualizer, QEMU achieves near native ...


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Another good visualization option for Ubuntu is VMware Workstation but, it is not free, (free as in you have to pay for it and you have no access to the source code). However, both virtualbox and vmware will give you poor video performance no matter what you do. OS visualization just doesn't provide you with good video performance. The best solution for ...


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I've found a solution - although not sure it's the right one. Adding the line: nameserver 192.168.0.4 into /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/head Seems to have done the trick.


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May way of solving this issue is to resort to vmhgfs-fuse installed with open-vm-tools. Either mount locally using vmhgfs-fuse .host:/$(vmware-hgfsclient) ~/some_mountpoint or globally using sudo mount -t fuse.vmhgfs-fuse .host:/ /mnt/hgfs -o allow_other. To then make mounting globally persistent add the following line to your /etc/fstab: .host:/ /mnt/hgfs ...


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The reason the process continues running is because when you close all of its windows it actually just minimizes to the tray, or at least, it carries on running until you have closed it using the Quit option either by choosing that for the option from the tray, or from File > Quit in one of the windows: As you probably will have also noticed from the ...



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