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Old question but since I stumbled upon it, this is why it was booting slowly: https://bugzilla.kernel.org/show_bug.cgi?id=107561


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From Windows, restart holding down the shift key. You will get some choices at restart, like "troubleshooting" and on another page, the UEFI settings (aka BIOS).


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You could be a victim of the Windows 'Hybrid Boot' or 'Fast Startup' and are thus never really shutting down your computer and subsequently not being able to access the BIOS. From your Windows installation open a Command Prompt as Administrator and then type: shutdown /s /f /t 0 On next startup you should be able to access the BIOS with your usual key ...


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try spamming enter when booting? I have a Lenovo ThinkPad L440. I only have to spam the enter button when I boot up my laptop


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I have figured out the problem! The problem was that for some reason when one has the Show location of pointer option enabled in the gnome-tweak-tool, as this is assigned to CTRL, for some reason this prevents programs from capturing this key. So disabling that option in the gnome-tweak-tool fixes the issue.


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With the help of @Serg's answer, I crafted this set of three scripts (Python 3 and Bash) which listens for Unity Shutdown/Logout dialogs, checks for running VMs, blocks the Unity dialog, displays a nice progress bar, waits until all VMs are off or the timeout is reached, asks if remaining VMs should be forcibly killed and finally displays a custom ...


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Do you have the guest additions installed? This helps with a lot of these issues. In the VirtualBox window running your VM: Devices -> Insert Guest Additions CD Image... Or, right ctrl + D Follow the prompts and then restart your VM and it should work. As was said before the right ctrl is the host key by default and as so will not work for ...


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Right Ctrl Is used as "Host" key by virtual machine. You can change Host key in VB global settings or use left Ctrl as normal Ctrl key. You can see a hint in the lower right corner of a virtual machine window.


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Below is a small script that should be run as autostart entry or manually (if user prefers so). The basic idea is this: keep polling dbus session bus, and if we get reboot, or shutdown, or logout, then we can check if QEMU is running; if it is, kill the shutdown dialog, run the command to shutdown the VMs, and then call dbus to shutdown, or even call ...


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The virtual machine definition itself will occupy little space. The thing that will occupy space is the virtual disk where the client OS will be installed, as long as the possible snapshots you'll take1. Normally the disks are installed in a directory called VirtualBox VMs under your home; so it will by default occupy space in your home partition. Native ...


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there is only a paltry 8.7 MB unpartitioned space left. Not important. Now can anyone tell me where exactly this 10 GB space is being taken from and, more importantly, whether this threatens my data in the various partitions? From the partition you installed the virtual machine. The VM makes a file on your system and treats that as a filesytem ...


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To achieve static IP, edit /etc/network/interfaces and add: auto eth0 iface eth0 inet static address 192.168.100.100 netmask 255.255.255.0 gateway 192.168.1.1 # or whatever your gateway is Then enable the device with sudo ifup eth0 and you should be done.


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Okay, after a lot of trial and error I finally managed to get it working as it should, without any hiccups. Some of the following steps might not be required in order to make it work, but it did work for me after making them. If someone want to modify the answer and get rid of the unnecessary steps then please do it. Besides what I said above when using ...


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Actually, bridged net should work! Note: If they are cloned machines or restored from same image, change the MAC addresses Bridged net setup As you had already tried similar setup, confirm that you have same interface selected example wlan0 & cable connected flagged. NAT Network net setup Add a NAT network Switch interfaces for both machines ...


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This happened to me today on Debian 8 (Jessie) following a kernel patch. I fixed it as follows: su (I don't use sudo; if you do, then prepend sudo to the lines below) dpkg-reconfigure virtualbox-dkms dpkg-reconfigure virtualbox /etc/init.d/virtualbox restart Thanks to Rikard/hg8 for the above tip on steps 2 and 3. In my case it's just possible they ...


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Make sure you have installed all the required packages on the CentOS machine. You can do that simply by installing whole group for X system: yum groupinstall "X Window System"


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Try one of this: Press Ctrl+Alt+F7 to launch the GUI interface From the terminal change your desired resolution with: xrandr -s 1024x768 where 1024x768 is your desired resolution and reboot the system by: sudo reboot Waiting for your response.


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Have a look at LibVirt and VirtManager, both completely free alternatives to XenCenter, and they support more hypervisors than Xen alone. Ubuntu Server 14.04 should have the packages readily available via apt-get install libvirt0 virt-manager Once done, fire up VirtManager from the command line with virt-manager. It should connect to your Xen daemon ...


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As alternative, you didn't need to reinstall it, just change the file permission of VMMR0.r0. sudo chmod 755 /usr/lib/virtualbox/VMMR0.r0 That's work for me on VirtualBox 5.0.12 Ubuntu 14.04.


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There happens to be a kind guy arnoldthebat, who makes regular releases of builds of Chromium OS that are pretty much compatible with almost all x86 (i386, or 32 bit) and amd64 (64 bit Intel or AMD) CPU based laptops. Most of your generic hardware like touchpads, speakers should work, and if you're not too unlucky(read have a Broadcomm card), most probably ...


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Best to create the VM after the restart. Basically the machine in not in a running state while being kickstarted. You shouldn't rely on things such as services to be running during a kickstart. Use "InitialSetup" to run your virt-install . https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/InitialSetup InitialSetup may not be available in Ubuntu although it doesn't mention it ...



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