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You could also try vagrant. This is a super easy way to create and work with VM's and Ubuntu releases images that are scrutinized and used by thousands of developers. Using vagrant is super easy. Install vagrant apt-get install vagrant Add a box of the distro you want vagrant box add trusty/amd64 Start the VM vagrant up UPDATE: For a simple ...


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You should not need to use static settings instead. Also, I see that you have already found this answer For a dynamic IP address solution, you should set up a real bridge and use it. Your interfaces file should become: # This file describes the network interfaces available on your system # and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5). ...


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I've never used QEMU, but from what I'm seeing on their documentation, it looks like it will create floppy support by default for an x86 architecture machine, even if you don't have a floppy drive in your physical machine. VMWare and VirtualBox do the same thing. It shouldn't affect performance of the VM unless you're really worried about the VENOM ...


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As per the comment, you should first try to toggle the setting within BIOS. The BIOS is a special program hardwired into your computer which you can access by pressing the appropriate keys (usually F2 or delete) during the first few seconds of startup--and before the OS itself starts. Once you get into the BIOS, you need to try and look the setting within ...


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Without knowing your BIOS manufacturer: Restart your computer and open the BIOS settings (eg. press F2 during the start). The setting for VT-x (Intel Virtualization Technology) is often to find under the menu item Security or CPU Configuration. If F2 doesn't work try this keys: F1, F10, DEL, ESC


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I would install Ubuntu server edition and select only virtual machine host at the Software Selection step. See also.


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I am unfortunately not sure if I understood all questions the right way, so please feel free to ask again if something is not clear: VirtualBox is a usual application as e.g. a Word processor is. That means the application asks the underlying OS (because an OS cares about the resources a computer HW has) for RAM. Of course it is a special application ...


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I would comment but I don't have enough rep... TBH I don't think that this is an Ubuntu issue but one more to do with how you have KVM set up. Also off on something of a tangent, unless you have pretty new Server grade hardware (with the right options enabled in your UEFI/BIOS and your host OS) nested visualization (i.e. virtualisation inside ...



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