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The virtual machine definition itself will occupy little space. The thing that will occupy space is the virtual disk where the client OS will be installed, as long as the possible snapshots you'll take1. Normally the disks are installed in a directory called VirtualBox VMs under your home; so it will by default occupy space in your home partition. Native ...


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Below is a small script that should be run as autostart entry or manually (if user prefers so). The basic idea is this: keep polling dbus session bus, and if we get reboot, or shutdown, or logout, then we can check if QEMU is running; if it is, kill the shutdown dialog, run the command to shutdown the VMs, and then call dbus to shutdown, or even call ...


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With the help of @Serg's answer, I crafted this set of three scripts (Python 3 and Bash) which listens for Unity Shutdown/Logout dialogs, checks for running VMs, blocks the Unity dialog, displays a nice progress bar, waits until all VMs are off or the timeout is reached, asks if remaining VMs should be forcibly killed and finally displays a custom ...


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there is only a paltry 8.7 MB unpartitioned space left. Not important. Now can anyone tell me where exactly this 10 GB space is being taken from and, more importantly, whether this threatens my data in the various partitions? From the partition you installed the virtual machine. The VM makes a file on your system and treats that as a filesytem ...


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After installation KVM run this command then that error will not occur again sudo virt-manager


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Make sure you have installed all the required packages on the CentOS machine. You can do that simply by installing whole group for X system: yum groupinstall "X Window System"


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I have figured out the problem! The problem was that for some reason when one has the Show location of pointer option enabled in the gnome-tweak-tool, as this is assigned to CTRL, for some reason this prevents programs from capturing this key. So disabling that option in the gnome-tweak-tool fixes the issue.


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Sure but they're different approaches to roughly the same thing. Clonezilla (et al) involves taking a complete bootloader-through-application image. It's big and there's no de-duplication (if you have 50 instances of a similar stack). You also store a load of stuff that is easily replaceable. Docker installs on stock Ubuntu (installable from a CD). Each ...



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