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A user may be a member of multiple groups. A file is be owned by exactly one group and one user. If the user is a member of the file's owner group (i.e., group foo owns the file and one of the user's groups is foo), then the respective group permissions apply to that user (unless overridden by the owner permissions). The owner group is part of the file's ...


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Users should own their own files. Open a terminal with CTRLALTT or your preferred method issue the command sudo chown -R *username* */path/name* where username is the name of the user you want to give ownership to and /path/name is the path to their home directory. This should resolve the vast majority of your issues. Example sudo chown -R joe /home/joe ...


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@binW To do this through /etc/fstab add this line: /<new home directory> /home/<user> none bind 0 0


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One way would be to send the SIGSTOP signal to all of your brother's processes: sudo pkill -STOP -u brother To awaken the stopped processes, the SIGCONT signal is used: sudo pkill -CONT -u brother You can use an Upstart session job, one which would run when you logged in or out or locked or unlocked your screen. For example, create a .conf file in ...


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Check this Save and Restore Linux Processes with CRIU


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Check which application is taking higher resources. Find the pid of that application using the command pidof "application name" without the quotes. sudo kill -STOP "ID of the process" Then once you have completed your work use the below command to start that stopped process. sudo kill -CONT "PID that you have killed earlier" Give it a try!


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Since this is a school setup, they are probably using LDAP for authentication, in which case you won't be able to modify group membership. You'll have to contact your school's IT department or system administrator. You can't modify them because because any sane LDAP setup requires administrator access to the LDAP service to modify group membership (which ...


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The UID of the files' owner might be different from 1000, which is the uid of the first user created. You can use the stat command to determine it. You can: use sudo -i to become root (no password needed on live session) and access all the files. The simplest option. chown the files to UID 1000 - might be time consuming depending on the number of files. ...


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To remove all guest accounts: for line in $(grep -o 'guest-......' /etc/passwd | sort -u); do sudo deluser $line; done Sample output: Removing user `guest-2LGMce' ... Warning: group `guest-2LGMce' has no more members. Done. Removing user `guest-5T4CBr' ... Warning: group `guest-5T4CBr' has no more members. Done. Removing user `guest-8eZELT' ... Warning: ...


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I don't think there is a single unified command for this. For most things, you can use the finger command: $ finger $USER Login: root Name: root Directory: /root Shell: /bin/bash On since Thu Jan 15 13:46 (IST) on tty1 19 days 18 hours idle Last login Tue Feb 3 20:55 (IST) on pts/5 from localhost No ...


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Try using Access Control Lists (ACL). You can find about ACL here. This should allow you to set permissions for multiple groups on individual folders. You will be required to download acl: sudo apt-get install acl and modify your fstab to enable acl file permissions.


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I don't think this is possible, as every file/folder on an ext filesystem only offers to set permission for: An owner user An owner group Everybody else So, can't set file/folder permissions for more than one particular group.



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