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0

The user account information is stored in /etc/passwd in a default Ubuntu installation. Password information is in /etc/shadow and group information in /etc/group. None of these files should be edited by hand.


0

In python this would be done like import grp import pwd print([x for x in grp.getgrnam('sudo').gr_mem if pwd.getpwnam(x).pw_shell not in ('/bin/false', '/bin/nologin')]) Where grp.getgrnam('sudo').gr_mem would return all group members of group sudo and pwd.getpwnam(USER).pw_shell returns the users shell from /etc/passwd. But only group membership in ...


3

There is two types of accounts, system and regular user. System accounts belong to services and daemons, such as lightdm, dnsmasq, etc.Typically you cannot login into those accounts (although there are ways). Regular users, such as your account or other people accounts, can login and interact with the OS through shell (could be bash, ksh, mksh, csh, or ...


-1

Do ctrl + C that kills any command like cat Hope this helped you :)


1

#1 Back up your data! #2 Add the user with the exact same username as before. #3 You should have all your settings and files back. Alternative for geeks: #1 Backup Backup Backup your data! #2 Add this line to then end of /etc/passwd (replace [username] with your username, replace 1700 with your previous userid, and replace 1701 with your previous groupid - ...


0

In 15.10, you can go: System settings User accounts Unlock (top right corner) Select user Click automatic login This unchecks automatic login for other users, and automatically logs into that user without a password. If you are worried about not having a password, encrypt your disk instead (will ask for a password before login screen). If an attacker ...


0

5030 is the UID (User ID) of the arcsight user. It means that this user is not defined in the local /etc/passwd file.


5

Usernames containing spaces are not allowed by default on Ubuntu, so this method should be robust: who | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | while read user; do for gid in $(id -G "$user"); do [ $gid -eq $(id -g) ] && printf '%s\n' "$user" && break; done; done | sort -u who: prints the list of currently logged in users; cut -d ' ' -f 1: prints the first ...


1

adduser is a Perl script, using Getopt::Long. Unless explicitly told to do so, Getopt::Long will accept single-hyphen long options, and adduser doesn't tell it do so. So, -ingroup will work just as well as --ingroup. Don't rely on this to work in the future, though.


0

I think that the best way is to use EncryptedHome. For sensitive user accounts, create them using the option encrypt-home. Check the caveats on the page if it fits your requirements.


0

You can encrypt the files/folders using seahorse. It integrates well with Natuilus, and you can simply. Encrypt by clicking right and select encrypt Reference: http://askubuntu.com/a/27780/488702


2

Open a file manager and click on the partition to mount it. Then, run the following command to gain full ownership of the partition and all contained files: sudo chown -R $USER:$USER /media/$USER/* or, sudo chown -R gsamaras:gsamaras "/media/gsamaras/a6cd1464-abf1-4a7b-b4a2-61f584d4cb32"


0

I don't if this will work in your situation but whats the harm in trying right ? why not create a user with the same name and uid as that hadoopuser sudo -i #adduser -u 1001 hadoopuser then try to access if didn't wroked which is the way it should become root sudo -i #chmod 666 foldername/ #chmod 666 foldername/* #chown -R yourlocaluser:yourlocaluser ...


1

Users can be limited to their home directories by uncommenting /etc/vsftpd.conf file: chroot_local_user=YES To limit a specific list of users, allow only their home directories: chroot_list_enable=YES chroot_list_file=/etc/vsftp.chroot_list Set User HOME Directory: usermod --home /home/user username Set required permission on /home/user Restart ...


-2

Go to System > Preferences > keyboard shortcuts run a terminal: Ctrl+Alt+t and type: passwd user .. enter new password for user If no luck You can refer the link From the official Ubuntu Lost Password documentation: Reboot your computer. Hold Shift during boot to start GRUB menu. Highlight your image and press E to edit. Find the line starting with ...


0

Welcome to Ubuntu World.How did you login to your system? If your User Account is previously set to login without password you may try this. Open up Terminal and type in passwd. Enter a new password (For a strong password make sure it has capitals, more than 8 characters and numbers) and press enter. Retype your new password and press enter.


0

Entering the following command worked for me: sudo chmod 777 /var/lib/samba/usershares


5

From man 5 passwd: /etc/passwd contains one line for each user account, with seven fields delimited by colons (“:”). These fields are: · login name · optional encrypted password · numerical user ID · numerical group ID · user name or comment field · user home directory · optional user command interpreter The x would be the optional ...


2

Every Ubuntu release gets its own codename. For instance, Ubuntu 15.04 is called Vivid Vervet. 14.04 is called Trusty Tahr. Lucid and Karmic aren't "categories," they're version names of two different releases of Ubuntu. Lucid's full name is Lucid Lynx. It's the codename for Ubuntu 10.04, which was released in April of 2010. It's really old, and no longer ...


0

They're respectively users of Ubuntu Lucid Lynx (thatis, Ubuntu 10.04 LTS) and Ubuntu Karmic Koala (thatis, Ubuntu 9.10). You can have a look at the list of Ubuntu releases here. To know which version you are running, type the following in a terminal: lsb_release -a


6

Your tomcat7 user has no login shell, have a look at /bin/false in the output below % grep tomcat /etc/passwd tomcat7:x:134:149::/usr/share/tomcat7:/bin/false and there is no need to switch your user. To run a command as tomcat7 use % sudo -u tomcat7 whoami tomcat7


2

Looking at Andre Herman Bezerra's answer, the only problem with this is pointed out in the comments this DOES NOT restrict the user to update only (they can install/remove packages). If you want to restrict a user to be able to update only you're better off doing the following. Create a group or use the %staff group. In this example, i'm choosing to use ...


2

One simple solution is to simply add yourself to your son's primary group. For example if your username is "father" and your son's primary group is "son" (i.e. by default files are created as belonging to group "son"), then just do this to add yourself to that group: sudo gpasswd -a father son You will have to log out and back in for the change to take ...


0

You can run sudo visudo to edit the /etc/sudoers file. There, or can specify which users will be allowed to do which sudo commands. It is recommended to view the man page before (http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/trusty/en/man5/sudoers.5.html) The deny special things write an ! in front of it. YourFriend = ALL=ALL, !*raspi.conf*


1

I have to save the ssh key file into: /home/any_user/.ssh/ It is not true. You can store your key wherever you want, but it must be: secure place, so nobody else can read it if it is not standard location (~/.ssh/id_{rsa,dsa,ecdsa,...}, you need to tell ssh about the key. This is what we have config for. You can add line IdentityFile path/to/your/key ...


1

If by "the sudo" you mean the root user, then yes, that's exactly the location to store it.


0

I appeared that the account had slow keys active by default so that when I entered the password using onboard, everything worked. The guest account worked when pressed an extra Enter key.


5

Firstly, there should be zero reason to login as the tomcat7 user. There's no logical use case for this, so therefore I'm not sure why you'd try and use it. You state in your question you want to set up a virtual X server for a webapp - you don't need to login as tomcat7 to do this, though your question isn't "How can I launch a virtual X server for my ...


0

You can do it with the useradd command. Just issue: sudo useradd new-username Replacing new-username with the name you want. Now let's set new-usernames's password: sudo passwd new-username You'll be prompted to type the new password twice. Nothing will be displayed on the screen while you do it. If you want your user to be in groups such as sudo, ...


0

Here are the commands to add a new user with the username "newuser" sudo adduser newuser sudo passwd newuser


0

If you have more time for trouble shooting and want to save as much of your personal stuff as you can, then instead of deleting the whole /home/*USERNAME*/.config/libreoffice folder, try to rename just the /home/*USERNAME*/.config/libreoffice/*VERSION#*/user/config/ folder. It worked for me, but I still have to test to see what all is now missing or ...


2

You can change the password via the GUI on XFCE by following these steps. First open the all settings from the menu, now choose users and groupsfrom the bottom and click change next to the password Now just enter your new password and click OK.


0

Open up a terminal, and type sudo passwd yourusername. Where ¨yourusername¨ has to be your user name, of course.



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