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1

Restart machine In grub menu choose advanced option Select "recovery" item In window menu choose "root" Type: passwd user_name reboot Your grub menu is probably hidden - so you need to use keyboard (ESC) to see it :-) You can also use live-cd distro to do this task. mount your "/" partition (let say: /media/sda1), and use chroot /media/sda1. Then type ...


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You have to remove the user from the group plugdev. You can do it in the Users & Groups app.


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If using a standard installation procedure then yes, User B will be able to use the software installed by User A. There are however utilities that once installed locally will only work locally. (E.G. simple utilities installed in /home/user/bin)


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First it should be noted that by using su ubuntu one would end up using the current user's environment, while what one usually wants to do is to use the target user's environment; so sudo - ubuntu would be the way to go. However, su is not documented enough, but the fact that to login as an user which has no password is not allowed is probably just su's ...


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For using su user1 as user2 you need to enter the password of user1 when doing this as standard user. A simple workaround however is doing it as root, as then no password is needed. I.e.: become root (using sudo su), then su into the user1 (using su user1). I do not understand why you want to su to ubunut when you already are that user (as indicated in your ...


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If you are getting connection refused error at end then make sure that "Subsystem sftp internal-sftp" is place after "UsePAM yes". If not then update and Restart ssh and it worked.


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On several systems around here, it's become a tradition for each user to create a folder named "public" in their own home folder. I.e., my home directory is "/home/dc/", and I have a public folder at "/home/dc/public". That public folder and all the files in it is world-readable. Also, the world execute bit is set on the "/home/dc/" and "/home/dc/public/" ...


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Generally, the folder that is predefined for that use would be your public folder. It is sometimes, on some distros, even set up to be available via network request and is usually pretty unprotected permission wise unless you have encrypted your home folder if you want my personal advice, I would either create a new folder in / (root) or a new partition with ...


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The only easy way of doing this in Linux right now is using a virtual machine to try out KDE on. There are hard ways, including editing all .desktop files, compiling KDE from scratch, or installing a separate distro, but for what you want a virtual machine would be the best approach.


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Execute the ls -l to list the permissions, owner, and group for all files and directories in a particular directory: ls -l /var ls -l /var/www ls -l /var/www/folder1 ls -l /var/www/folder/folder2 index.html will be included in the listed contents of the last directory so no command is necessary. Although, if you did want to know the ownership and ...


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Just a reminder: Ubuntu create folders with default permissions 755 and files with default permissions 644. You can change this default value playing with umask. So in general No files don't inherit their parent permissions, instead newly created files/dirs have the default permissions Back to your question: You are getting confused with permissions. ...


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It'll be better if the '/opt' folder isn't writeable from a normal user but to give John full permissions to a it, you may make him the owner of the directory and it's contents. Use the following command (expecting the username is John): sudo chown -R John /opt


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According to here, to set security for xampp, you can run the following commands: sudo -s /opt/lampp/lampp security answer: yes to all questions and create a password for each of the categories. When you are finished, don't forget to type: exit and sudo -k Now, on the index.php page it should ask you for a username. The default username is ...


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Make sure the Lock Screen option is deselected on your Power Manager, Session and Startup Advanced tab, and on the Screen Saver. Go to Startup Applications and deselect the item titled Screen Locker.


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Don't reinvent the wheel - badly. Use auditing. Tracking who accesses what files is exactly what auditing is for. A good link to get started is here. Auditing goals By using a powerful audit framework, the system can track many event types to monitor and audit the system. Examples include: Audit file access and modification See ...


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Using iwatch iwatch o_O is a realtime filesystem monitoring program using inotify and a working local mail service For a better obscurity you should change the mail address and start the deamon as root, or something else … :) sudo apt-get install iwatch Create a configuration file with the name iwatch.xml <?xml version="1.0" ?> <!DOCTYPE ...


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Using find The following solution works not with deleted files and, if you have not set noatime in your fstab, eg: defaults,noatime Using find after you have your account back. find ~ -atime -1 means, accessed less than 1 day. Or a combination: find ~ -atime 1 -atime -2 means 1-2 days ago from man find -atime n File was last ...


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yes it is possible first tell in any tty use command export DISPLAY=":1" after this command you must start x manager by typing startx then you can start there and when you press ctrl+alt+f9 you will see new x window manager


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You will have to check the client logs on those machines, under /var/log/landscape. Something prevented landscape from reading /etc/passwd. Could also be that that computer is not exchanging correctly with the server. Are other pieces of information about it correct, like installed packages? Grep for "consecutive error" in the message-server.log files on ...


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For commands which do not need to be connected to a tty or X server (i.e. a few command-line based admin utilities) you can use su root -c <command> The command may need to be enclosed in quote marks, and you will be prompted for the root user's password. Note that this requires the root account to be enabled, which it is not by default on Ubuntu. I ...


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you must add the standard user to the /etc/sudoers files to give them priviledges to run elevated commands. For example with a user called 'demo': demo ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL The first field indicates the username that the rule will apply to (demo). The first "ALL" indicates that this rule applies to all hosts. The second "ALL" indicates that the demo user ...


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Where the pg_hba.conf file resides: pg_hba.conf is in /etc/postgresql/X.Y/main/ (where X.Y is your version, 9.3 for you, 9.4 for me). "Missing" programs: pg_ctl may not be installed by default. initdb may also not be installed by default. Both are installable by postgres-xc. Adding users so they can be authorized: You'll have to add a user/role in ...


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You can find it easily by just using cut : cut -d: -f1,3 /etc/passwd -d: sets the delimiter as : for cut -f1,3 extracts the field 1 and 3 only delimited by : from the /etc/passwd file Check man cut to get more idea. Example : $ cut -d: -f1,3 /etc/passwd root:0 daemon:1 bin:2 sys:3 sync:4 games:5 ...... If you have ldap configured, to include the ...


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List all users with a /home folder: awk -F: '/\/home/ {printf "%s:%s\n",$1,$3}' /etc/passwd or all users with a UID >= 1000: awk -F: '($3 >= 1000) {printf "%s:%s\n",$1,$3}' /etc/passwd a combination awk -F: '/\/home/ && ($3 >= 1000) {printf "%s:%s\n",$1,$3}' /etc/passwd or for all entries awk -F: '{printf "%s:%s\n",$1,$3}' ...



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