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2

Use this script: #! /bin/bash # for i in $(cat /etc/passwd | cut -d: -f1); do echo -n $i ": " grep $i /etc/group | cut -d: -f1 | tr "\n" " " echo done It will list all users in the system (included system) and print the list of groups near them. With a trivial modification you can print the numeric id too.


0

locate is not looking directly in the filesystem, it uses a database (or more than one). The database is updated using the updatedb command, which is usually scheduled as a daily cron job. So I guess in this case, what you are seeing is the indexed information from yesterday. Once the updatedb cron job completes, you should not see these anymore. You ...


0

The "patched" Upstart configuration you link to is the same as the Upstart configuration that was shipped with Upstart 1.3 (from cannot get upstart to run user job), so I'd say that is the simplest way to enable user jobs.


5

Assuming that you have sudo privileges the following command will do. sudo cp /home/USER1/FNAME /home/USER2/FNAME && sudo chown USER2:USER2 /home/USER2/FNAME Will copy the file from USER1 to USER2, and then change the owner of the copy in /home/USER2 to USER2 If you do not have sudo privileges, then the two users will need to ensure that you have ...


0

I have had same problem like you, and you proabaly need to use thunar, and to do this you have to enter in the terminal this: sudo -i gksudo thunar and then you can alter promising to all of you files, and it might work fine this way.


2

Probably the most novice friendly solution for browsing files is to start nautilus with root privileges. gksu nautilus If you want to change permissions for files you should have a look at chmod. See also here http://www.perlfect.com/articles/chmod.shtml It might be that you encrypted the home partition of the other user. If that is the case and you ...


0

Is the user connecting via ssh ? If so, there is a ChrootDirectory option to jail a user to a specified directory, meaning he can not navigate higher up the directory tree. Take a look here for a working example https://www.debian-administration.org/article/590/OpenSSH_SFTP_chroot_with_ChrootDirectory


3

Is a system user what you are looking for? You can create a new one with the following command adduser --system --no-create-home USERNAME This is the kind of account mysql uses. However, you cannot login into these accounts, even with sudo su - USERNAME. If you want to be able to login with su -, just create a new user without a password. useradd ...


1

One idea - but will need a bit of work in scripting --- be my guest ;-) Find a suid/sgid file; let's call it scommand Check from which package has been installed: dpkg -S /full/path/to/scommand Compare its permission with the original deb package, by firstly downloading the package: apt-get download package Check if the command should have the suid ...


1

Frustrated with autolog, I wrote my own script too. It's on Github. It's general enough for multiple users, on X sessions and TTYs. I have included an Upstart job, assuming that the script is placed at /usr/bin/idle-killer.sh To set it up: sudo apt-get install xprintidle sudo wget ...


1

I wrote my own script to do this. There is a tool called xprintidle that gives you the idle time of an xsession. You need to install it first sudo apt-get install xprintidle Then create the script, for example in /root/bin/idle_check.sh: #!/bin/sh DISPLAY=:0 TIMEOUT=600000 # 10min = 10 * 60 * 1000 if [ $(xprintidle) -gt $TIMEOUT ]; then ...


0

Webmin is outdated and has security problems and should not be used. I had the same problem on 14.04. Many people answered my question and said Samba was not so screwed up on previous versions of Ubuntu. But this is a function and alias I add to my $HOME/.bashrc. #################### # $1 is parameter for function function fAdduser { if [ -z $1 ]; then ...


0

You seem to have accidentally installed in OEM mode. Add user manually, according to this for example. You should better use a new username.


0

CoalaWeb's answer is correct, but if you don't want to make a custom group for that user... you can simply use the following command to create a user: sudo useradd <username> example: sudo useradd josh ...then rightly said by CoalaWeb, follow the command: sudo adduser <username> <groupname> example: sudo adduser josh sudo ...


0

This is how to create a new user from unity-control-center user-accounts (search for User Accounts in Dash): From an administrator account unlock settings (click on Unlock to enter password). Then add a user with +): Enter username: Enter password dialog by clicking on Password: Account disabled: Choose a strong password for the user. Shown here is ...


0

As a workaround, I deleted the user from the group nopasswdlogin: sudo gpasswd -d username nopasswdlogin I still don't know how to fix this via GUI.



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