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12

You probably need to set bash as your new users's login shell. If you are logged in as that user: chsh -s /bin/bash To change it for another user sudo chsh -s /bin/bash username In future you might want to use adduser instead of the low-level useradd, since it defaults to setting bash as the new login shell. You can check the login shell (among other ...


6

First of all, check if useradd shows a default value for SHELL. To do that, issue: useradd -D This will output something like: GROUP=100 HOME=/home INACTIVE=-1 EXPIRE= SHELL=/bin/sh SKEL=/etc/skel CREATE_MAIL_SPOOL=no These values are taken from /etc/default/useradd. Now, you have 2 solutions: Edit /etc/default/useradd, and change the value of ...


0

Press on your keyboard Ctrl+ALT+F1 Where [username] is put your username that you made when you installed Ubuntu


0

When a new user logs in, his home directory is created by copying /etc/skel/ to /home/<username>/. You only have to create the directoy /etc/skel/Desktop/ then put your .desktop file in there.


0

I'm facing the same problem as you did. Since the .wine folder are actually linked with Documents folder, it's probably gone. However, you can try to recover some of the files by referring to this page http://www.webupd8.org/2009/03/recover-deleted-files-in-ubuntu-debian.html. Hope it can help.


0

You should use a bind mount with the user/owner option. A bind mount does not take uid or gid. The bind mount will apply the permissions from the user or owner directory to the mount. The mount point should be owned by root. The user directory should be set up as desired. Add this line to /etc/fstab: /media/D/Leinardo/Documents Documents none bind,user ...


1

Have a look at /usr/share/doc/base-passwd/users-and-groups.txt.gz


2

Based on the lsattr output, the user's home directory has been marked as immutable which will mean that no files or directories may be added or deleted. You should be able to unset the immutable attribute using chattr i.e. sudo chattr -i /home/habefaro/


0

Perhaps the folder permissions are not correct. Set home permission to default (0775): this set also subdirectories sudo chmod -R 775 /home/habefaro/


0

Maybe the user has no permission on some subdirectories in the home. Correct the owner permissions with: chown -R habefaro:habefaro /home/habefaro With this command the user habefaro will become owner of all file and folders in his home directory.


0

what about using setfacl? In few words, it would be matter of creating somewhere the directory (e.g. "share"), set users group (let's call it shareusers) as primary group for each user in it, set users group as owner group for your share (owner user being root) and finally use setfacl to define acls (something like setfacl -m d:g:shareusers:rwx ...


3

You can create a new, small, "shell" (I used quotes because is not a real shell) as follow: As root, create a new file in /bin directory, let say fakesh. Add the following code inside /bin/fakesh file: #!/bin/bash echo -n "$ " while read cmd ; do if [ "$cmd" = "exit" ]; then break; fi if [ "$cmd" != "" ]; then echo "The only one available command ...


1

There are a number of ways of doing this (start-up scripts in a real desktop, separate X sessions) but I think the best for the method you're suggesting is adding a XBMC session and using that from your secondary user. Note: some distributions of XBMC include the following already. All you might need to do is change session at the login screen. Click the ...


0

What you are trying to do is impossible. When you try to switch user from the drop-down menu in the gear indicator on the menu bar, the system needs to authenticate the user's identity and right to perform the action. It does so in a way that ultimately relies on the information in /etc/passwd. This fails since the user does not have a password set and ...


0

You may use who to check which users are logged in: who You can log-out the user by sending the KILL signal to the user-process with: sudo pkill -KILL -u <username> (which is same as sudo pkill -9 -u <username>) example: sudo pkill -9 -u guest-2Rw4Lq (to kill a guest session user named guest-2Rw4Lq)


0

Ok here goes my best shot at explaining this.First of all root is like what the System user name would be. It has the highest level of permissions available. Some apps require you to run them as root in order to unlock their full potential (i.e. to carry out tasks regularly unavailable to just an administrator/user) Secondly, user is kind of a generic term ...


6

root: is a special account which is usually locked in Ubuntu. This account is in effect the ultimate super user and can change anything on the system. If you want to enable this account you can but its not recommended see How to enable root login? For how this can be done and a discussion on why its not recommended. user: These are the users of your ...


0

Try vnstat. Here is a link to the Ubuntu page. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowToMonitorInternetTrafficTotals



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