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1

About an hour ago, I had the same problem. I changed my UID, logged out and logged in. I stuck an external drive in the USB port and saw that it was mounted. When I clicked on the drive icon on the Desktop, UBUNTU said that it doesn't know how to open the file. You are lucky since the error message lead you directly to the problem.I am using XUBUNTU ...


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That looks like lxdm, the display manager LXDE uses. I gathered from the comments that you installed LXDE, and because of that lxdm was installed as well. To reset the display manager back to lightDM (Ubuntu's default) you can run this command: sudo dpkg-reconfigure lightdm Select "ok" and then "lightdm". Reboot. Alternatively removing lxdm would ...


1

Another way is to change the username directly in apache config, this is if it's your local machine and you save images from somewhere else that would crush any permissions made on the folder. Also to do if you have only 1 user and don't care about www-data! $ sudo vi /etc/apache2/apache2.conf Find User and Group and put yours User <Your User> Group ...


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You could just test it in a virtual box of Ubuntu. That way you would have full control of network seting and there is also minimal risk of corruption


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Add the user as suggested by other answer using usermod command. Run the command id. You should see vboxusers in the list. If you don't see that, you may restart your computer and try id again. When you get vboxusers listed as a result of running id, you're good to use USB with virtual box.


2

Changing system settings requires superuser permissions. From a terminal, do sudo <editor> <filename> where could be vim or nano or any other editor command, and is the one you need to edit. You could also usegksudo gedit <filename>. In either case you will be prompted for password of a user with superuser permissions - in a normal ...


1

Procedure to rename or change user name in Ubuntu: Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T And run: sudo -i killall -u oldname id oldname usermod -l newname oldname groupmod -n newname oldname usermod -d /home/newname -m newname usermod -c “New_real_name” newname id newname Example: sudo -i killal -u belaje id belaje uid=1000(belaje) gid=1000(belaje) ...


0

getent passwd This method has the advantage of listing both users that are defined on this system (i.e. listed in /etc/passwd) and users that may be brought in via a single sign-on method, e.g. LDAP users. If you only want to see the non-system users: getent passwd | awk -F ':' '$3>999' | grep -v nobody


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Please try the below to change the user name in home directory, usermod -d /home/newHomeDir -m newUsername Hope this helps !


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Failsafe way They are listed in /etc/passwd. However, this will include "system" users. Generally, "normal" users start with a UID of 1000, so you can filter these out with. awk -F ':' '$3>999' /etc/passwd N.B. that I also have a user called "nobody" with UID 65534, so there are some false positives. Explanation of code awk -F ':' use awk with ...


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you can check for processes from the user using lsof -u username and kill the relevant PIDs. Or pkill -u username or pkill -u uid


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You can do it with these commands in terminal: sudo userdel user_name sudo rm -rf /home/user_name


2

try su - Password: <Enter password of root user> root@host: sudo deluser sonu sidenote : If you write su- for very first time on the terminal then first you have to activate root user by assigning password. $ sudo passwd root [sudo] password for <currentuser>: Enter new UNIX password: Retype new UNIX password: passwd: password updated ...


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create a partition using Gparted. I recommend you to format it with NTFS (it will not be much fragmented since it will hold only big media files, unlike C drive. fat32 on the ,other hand, will not allow to copy/save files larger than 5GB. Also NTFS can be mounted when in windows) Open up Disk program from dash. click on the partition and then click on gear ...


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Wouldn't a fat32 partition work for viewing media and writing new media, since fat32 doesn't save any owner permissions? May be a problem for executing a file, since it doesn't save executable permissions either, but it sounds like you won't actually be storing executable files there, just media (movies, pics, etc). Or for a permissions-aware FS (like ext) ...


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Most of them are system daemons and can't actually log in, they represent processes started by the init system. If you look at cat /etc/passwd, you'll see them all listed. The last field is the default shell, which may be /sbin/nologin or /bin/false indicating their lack of login possibilities. The forth field (each field is separated by an ...


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You can use the more advanced deluser command: sudo deluser --remove-home user You can also try the the --remove-all-files option. From man deluser: By default, deluser will remove the user without removing the home directory, the mail spool or any other files on the system owned by the user. Removing the home directory and mail spool can be ...


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Step 1: Login Press CtrlAltF1 and you should see a text based login prompt. Type your username, press enter, type your password and press enter again. If there isn't any error message you should be logged in. Step 2: Reconfigure Light-dm Light-dm is what manages your graphical logins. It appears that somehow the configuration file got messed up. The ...


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This solution works for Upstart 1.5 on Ubuntu 12.04. Open the upstart config: sudo vim /etc/dbus-1/system.d/Upstart.conf Comment out the default policy, i.e. <policy context="default"> ... </policy> and paste the block from this patch: <!-- Allow any user to invoke all of the methods on Upstart, its jobs or their instances, and to ...


2

You will need more than one component to do this, and be aware that there are many ways to accomplish this; At first you will need to have an Linux Domain Controller (Like Windows AD), to do your AAA. Then also an database server must be used to store these information (LDAP in most cases). There are "all-in-one" solutions for this like Fedora 389DS. And ...


3

There are several software solutions designed especially for those task, but I can suggest a simple ad-hoc solution: On server, create a single grand /home directory and share it by NFS. On each client, move following files so that they, too, reside in NFS and share between PCs. /etc/passwd - user account information less the encrypted passwords ...


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Use this script: #! /bin/bash # for i in $(cat /etc/passwd | cut -d: -f1); do echo -n $i ": " grep $i /etc/group | cut -d: -f1 | tr "\n" " " echo done It will list all users in the system (included system) and print the list of groups near them. With a trivial modification you can print the numeric id too.



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