New answers tagged

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The group permissions are setup to make the same set of permissions available to many users. Consider a file xyz which needs permission of rwx for 5 users. There are two ways for accomplishing this. 1) Set individually permission of rwx for all 5 users for the file xyz. 2) Make a group ugroup (say). Set it's permission for file xyz as rwx and add all the 5 ...


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as mentioned above there are 3 sections to the permissions for an example which may be easier to understand here is how it is broken down say root is the owner/user of the file say video is the group and then as mentioned there is the world/other section which covers anyone that doesn't fit in the first two. Now if the file has permissions like ...


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Not only are there user and group permissions, there are also "other" or "world" permissions on files. To answer your first question, yes, a file has user or group permissions. To answer your second question, the second column does show group permissions and those permissions can be changed through the 'chmod' command.


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ps -f U $USER will show you the logged in user activity. You can replace the $USER with any user id or username. Please note you can't use it in conjunction with the -f option as incorrectly stated above.


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All such requests are logged in /var/log/auth.log in a format that looks similar to (anything from polkitd in there should relate to these forms of authentication request): Apr 23 17:45:09 tester-VirtualBox polkitd(authority=local): Operator of unix-session:c2 successfully authenticated as unix-user:tester to gain TEMPORARY authorization for action ...


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I wanted to clone my current profile to a new user. My home directory was large, almost 100 GB. bodhi.zazen's answer worked for me, but it took half a day of false starts before I got it right. Here's an expanded annotated version of his answer (I'm on Ubuntu 14.04): Create new user I just used the desktop UI: System Settings > User Accounts > Unlock > + ...


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To get all groups for all entries in /etc/passwd for user in $(getent passwd| cut -d: -f1); do groups $user; done explanation getent passwd: lists all lines in /etc/passwd in the usual format guest-ZlneMD:x:119:130:Guest,,,:/tmp/guest-ZlneMD:/bin/bash cut -d: -f1: removes all but the first field (fields are separated by :) the result is a list of all ...


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Don't reinvent the wheel. The id command can do exactly that: $ id foobar uid=1000(foobar) gid=1000(foobar) groups=1000(foobar),4(adm),20(dialout),24(cdrom) replace foobar with your desired username. Check man id to get more idea.


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When you boot your computer, press shift when the BIOS is done. You should end up in the grub boot menu, if now try again. There you choose advanced options for UBUNTU, and then your your actual kernel in recovery mode. You should end up in a menu where you can choose to be root and end up in a shell as such. Now remount your drive into read/write access. ...


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Short recommendation: if you have both PAM errors and the low graphics problem, try to fix the PAM problems first. I had this line in /etc/pam.d/common-account to enable time restrictions (it worked on the 32 bit installation): login account required pam_time.so I commented that line out, rebooted, and the PAM problem disappeared, AND the 'low ...


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Open a Terminal and type: echo $USER This will print the value of USER environment variable to the console.


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lightdm, the display manager in Ubuntu allows running session setup scripts as root if you add appropriate entry to /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf file (Note, that this file doesn't exist as of 14.04, you have to manually create it). Example of how it might look like [SeatDefaults] # session-setup-script = Script to run when starting a user session (runs as ...


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to add user to new group without affecting the current group use + before the group name, ofcourse this will not work with the primary group, user should have only one primary group and any others group. in this example create new group called "asmdba" and add it to the other group $ id -a uid=1001(oracle) gid=100(oinstall) groups=100(oinstall),101(dba) $ ...


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That's easy! It's called the guest session! Just give that particular user a USB stick to save their files to and you've got picture-perfect isolation without any additional work! If that's not restrictive enough, you can customise the guest session with all of your requirements... ;-)


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I've written a script that parses authentication logs. The basic idea that any installation attempt requires authentication from sudo and polkit. The script doesn't list whether or not installation attempt was successful or not - only the fact that user attempted to install something ; this feature might be added in future. The reason for that is ...


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Unfortunately Linux kernel enforces POSIX permission on ext2/ext3/ext4 FS. You may workaround POSIX permission with shared group. I ask corresponding question: http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/273144/predefined-group-ids-across-linux-distros/ but after all I made own research. I discover that sys group share id 3 on Debian, Ubuntu, RedHat, Fedora, ...



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