Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

You can remove the user from the sudo group: sudo deluser <username> sudo This way the user will be unable to run any sudo command.


2

Easy: convert your picture (using any picture program like gimp) to a square png and save it somewhere where all users have access. Then use it in the Add User Image...


2

Change /mnt/data owner and group to yourself like this: sudo chown basement21.basement21 /mnt/data And allow only you to read and write, and your personal group to only read: sudo chmod 750 /mnt/data


2

What you have is a free fall sensor, (accelerometer) whether it is failing, or giving erroneous data, I'm not sure. I recomend you black list the free fall sensor, and depending on how critical your hard disk drive space is, delete or clear the syslog file as well. sudo > /var/adm/sylog I am suspicious that there is another issue as well, that logs ...


1

From the Launcher click on System Settings -> under the System heading click User Accounts. A User Accounts window will open and you can select a user to view that user's account information, including Account Type, Language, Password (requires authentication), Automatic Login (ON/OFF), and Last Login. To view the user(s) information from the terminal ...


1

my script which automatically constructs a service account with ssh key login and no password #add service group/user addgroup service-runner useradd devops-service --create-home --shell /bin/bash --groups service-runner #gpasswd -a devops-service sudo #allowing sudo requires password, and not a good idea for a service account. mkdir ...


1

Open System Settings > User Accounts and click on the Unlock button in the top-right corner, enter your sudo password and the + button in the bottom-left corner will be available. If you need more advanced features, you can also install gnome-system-tools: open a Terminal by hitting Ctrl+Alt+t and type: sudo apt-get install gnome-system-tools Then press ...


1

To achieve the desire result as you indicated: Call your system to recognize /dev/sdb to belong to you: sudo adduser secretdrive sudo chown secretdrive:secretdrive /dev/sdb sudo adduser [your-username] secretdrive sudo chmod 770 /dev/sdb Explanation: assign a new system name to your drive: /dev/sdb chown-ize your drive to the system username of ...


1

The solution below assumes your friend is not an expert, trying to hack your computer to find a way to look into your data. It is however a reasonable threshold, to prevent unintended access (mounting) to a specific partition or drive. An option, that also can be used as a more temporary solution on any user account is the following: Add the following ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible