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5

Assuming that you have sudo privileges the following command will do. sudo cp /home/USER1/FNAME /home/USER2/FNAME && sudo chown USER2:USER2 /home/USER2/FNAME Will copy the file from USER1 to USER2, and then change the owner of the copy in /home/USER2 to USER2 If you do not have sudo privileges, then the two users will need to ensure that you have ...


3

Is a system user what you are looking for? You can create a new one with the following command adduser --system --no-create-home USERNAME This is the kind of account mysql uses. However, you cannot login into these accounts, even with sudo su - USERNAME. If you want to be able to login with su -, just create a new user without a password. useradd ...


2

Probably the most novice friendly solution for browsing files is to start nautilus with root privileges. gksu nautilus If you want to change permissions for files you should have a look at chmod. See also here http://www.perlfect.com/articles/chmod.shtml It might be that you encrypted the home partition of the other user. If that is the case and you ...


2

Use this script: #! /bin/bash # for i in $(cat /etc/passwd | cut -d: -f1); do echo -n $i ": " grep $i /etc/group | cut -d: -f1 | tr "\n" " " echo done It will list all users in the system (included system) and print the list of groups near them. With a trivial modification you can print the numeric id too.


1

I wrote my own script to do this. There is a tool called xprintidle that gives you the idle time of an xsession. You need to install it first sudo apt-get install xprintidle Then create the script, for example in /root/bin/idle_check.sh: #!/bin/sh DISPLAY=:0 TIMEOUT=600000 # 10min = 10 * 60 * 1000 if [ $(xprintidle) -gt $TIMEOUT ]; then ...


1

Frustrated with autolog, I wrote my own script too. It's on Github. It's general enough for multiple users, on X sessions and TTYs. I have included an Upstart job, assuming that the script is placed at /usr/bin/idle-killer.sh To set it up: sudo apt-get install xprintidle sudo wget ...


1

One idea - but will need a bit of work in scripting --- be my guest ;-) Find a suid/sgid file; let's call it scommand Check from which package has been installed: dpkg -S /full/path/to/scommand Compare its permission with the original deb package, by firstly downloading the package: apt-get download package Check if the command should have the suid ...



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