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man (the command, not the user) is a help application. Applications provide man pages in their packages but man needs to know where they are and also what help they provide. To speed things up — so man isn't search the whole filesystem when you type man <command> — these man pages are indexed into a database by a command called mandb. In Ubuntu mandb ...


5

Yes the root user is an official one. That user comes from a long line of historical influences. It's the conventional name of the user who has all rights or permissions. Most Unix-linke operating systems have a root user. It's not always called "root". You may know the Administrator of Windows operating systems. Some Linux derivates like Ubuntu allow ...


4

The line if [ 2 > 1 ]; then causes the shell to try and open a file named 1 for writing. Read the section REDIRECTION in the bash man page for an explanation. Your user1 apparently is allowed to write to that file, and user2 isn't. You were probably thinking of this: if [ 2 -gt 1 ]; then Which tests whether 2 is greater than 1, which is obviously ...


3

But you already have it. You can sudo with your own password, not root's. This can be set for any user in System Settings - User Accounts.


3

your parent folder permissions (var set to 755 and owner of root) limits your child folder. you need to change your permissions to var or change the owner to www-data:www-data and perms to 775 EDIT after some digging, the user needs to switch group with newgrp <group-name> before doing any operation. to return to the default group on that shell, type ...


2

That is not the question you should be asking. The purpose of sudo is to provide the function of administrator, without leaving the computer open to be exploited (at privileged-account level) when the user opens a file, goes to a website, or attaches a device. Note: That is a weakness (or flaw) in Windows XP, and one more reason why that OS is no longer ...


2

If I understand you correctly, you would like to set up a universal password that all users would have to input in order to execute a command as root with a sudo command. Example: Account-A = Password-1 Account-B = Password-2 root = root-password If Account-A or Account-B enters the command: sudo apt-get autoclean Then the subsequent output: ...


2

You can display with the help of compgen builtin command as follows: To display all users run following command: compgen -u To display all groups run following command: compgen -g However you can also display all users by cat /etc/passwd | cut -d ":" -f 1.


2

You're running the mount command as root and haven't specified a different username. You can add username=user to the -o list (where user is the username on target machine): sudo mount -t cifs //192.168.0.2/uniserv /tmp/uniserv/ -o username=user,sec=lanman,servern=Uniplus1 If you want to connect to the share as a guest, use guest instead of username=user ...


1

sudo is a commad that might be best read as "SetUser Do" command: The command can also be executed as sudo -u username docommand.foo see man sudo


1

Press Ctrl+Alt+F1 to switch console mode. Type your username and press Enter and also now type your password. Next type sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration and hit Enter type your password again and follow screen instruction. As usual, it will prompt you for the model of keyboard (what the keyboard is), and then for the keyboard layout (what the ...


1

It is root. In Ubuntu root defaults to having no password set so you have to sudo su - or sudo -s to login as root. Or if you really wanted, set a password for root and bypass the need for sudo (not adviseable) sudo su - Open the root users default environment, So you get the root users shell etc.. sudo -s Will open the shell defined in the ...


1

User has a primary group and can have several additional groups. User primary group is set /etc/passwd, ie: www-data:x:30:40:www-data:/var/www:/usr/sbin/nologin says user 'www-data' is a member of group id 40. You can add user to additional groups in /etc/group, but when you create a file, by default system will set user primary group as an owner, not ...


1

Enter this in the terminal: gsettings set com.canonical.indicator.session user-show-menu false And then reboot the machine. (In the other thread they suggest to use unity --replace & but it's always better to reboot). Source: askubuntu.com


1

You have misread the documentation. Given the spec: user host = (target_user:target_group) command in the sudoers of a system with hostname/IP host, user can execute command as target_user/target:group. If the system doesn't have hostname/IP host, this rule doesn't apply. Only the current system's hostname/IP is ever checked. It does not apply to remote ...



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