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5

Games is a standard system userid on Debian-based systems. There are many of these with UIDs < 1000. This allows the system to setup services with minimal privileges. This follows the least privilege model.


5

Repeat after me: Running ANY permission command on / without knowing exactly what you're doing is a great way to break your system. Even if you know what you're doing, it's still probably the wrong thing to do. In your case, the command won't work because it's the wrong one to start. Secondly, groups are a very valid Linux construct of users, and blocking ...


2

You can extract the information from /var/log/cups/page_log*, after that, it's a SMOP.


2

I solved it by the following: # adduser --home /home/bob bob # chown -R bob:bob /home/bob Since the new user does not automatically own the old home directory, they are initially unable to login. So I had to use the second line. Finally, there are still some glitches in the new account. I assume I will have to clear all of the cache and config files from ...


2

To answer your question you need a few steps to solve that. As first you create a user and his username, add a group for him and add him to this group. This you can do with one command or multiple commands, first the multiple approach where I add in comment lines for explanation: # adding a user hos with password 123 which you have provide by hand # you ...


1

On RHEL6/7, echo account required pam_access.so listsep=, >> /etc/pam.d/sshd Then add the following to /etc/security/access.conf +:root:LOCAL +:@localusers:ALL +:Domain Admins:ALL -:ALL:ALL This will allow cronjobs and domain admins from AD. Not there are ABSOLUTELY NO SPACES between anything other than the group name 'Domain Admins' ...


1

The issue is likely that your .desktop file for intellij only installed in the original users ~/.local/share/applications/intellij.desktop is what creates an icon you can search for and launch. If intellij wasn't actually Installed to that user locally try the following. cp /home/user2/.local/share/applications/intellij.desktop /home/user1/.local/share/...


1

You had a NOPASSWD rule applied to your user in some file in /etc/sudoers.d. Use sudo grep NOPASSWD /etc/sudoers.d -R to find out which. Your /etc/sudoers is not the default, however. The default sudoers can be obtained by looking at the sudo package: $ apt-get download sudo Get:1 http://mirror.cse.iitk.ac.in/ubuntu xenial-updates/main amd64 sudo amd64 1.8....


1

Edit your sudoers file using sudo visudo. Find this line: Defaults env_reset and change it to this: Defaults env_reset,timestamp_timeout=0 This forces sudo to ask for a password every time your run it.



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