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4

All of these answers are excessively bloated. Three characters for a command? Please. The fastest way to find who's logged on and doing what is: $ w


4

The easiest method to find who is logged on to your system is the use the who command, a part of the gnu coreutils package. It can be used as an ordinary user with no options or with my own favored option which enhances readability: andrew@ilium~$ who -H NAME LINE TIME COMMENT andrew tty1 2016-05-06 07:34 andrew@ilium~$ ...


2

After you created your user, before you log out of your old user make sure he is in the right groups: sudo adduser --home /home/<new-username> <new-username> sudo usermod -aG adm,cdrom,sudo,dip,plugdev,lpadmin,sambashare <new-username> Then : mv -v ~/* /home/<new-username>/ chown -R <new-username>:<new-username> ...


2

You can use the command users to see who is currently logged in. Take care.


1

Using "who" will tell you who's logged in. You can also use "ps au" and it will show who's logged in and what they are running.


1

To add users via the gui : go to the System Settings (the cog icon) -> User Accounts If you want to add users via the cli: sudo adduser USERNAME --ingroup phablet If you still have problems: check the permissions of the password file: ls -l /etc/passwd they should be -rw-r--r-- and belong to root:root you can fix this with chmod to change ...



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