Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I just installed 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn, which appeared yesterday) and it worked like a charm. It was recognized and like any other USB memory stick.


0

This command could help : sudo apt-get install mtpfs sudo apt-get install calibre


0

Older Macs cannot boot BIOS based OS's via USB, afaik, Only macs that don't come with a DVD/CD drive can boot non efi OS's on USBs. (Such as MBAs)


1

This is not a matter of the Linux kernel supporting your keyboard; it's a matter of your keyboard supporting use with the Linux kernel. Also, according to the Launchpad link you posted, your keyboard works fine if you take it out of gaming mode. It was Gigabyte's design choice to build its "gaming mode" in a way that works out-of-the-box with Windows but ...


0

I believe what you are looking at is the Live Boot menu from your USB device. I think you would se the regular grub menu, when you boot up, without the USB device in. The Try Ubuntu and Install Ubuntu options are only available when booting a live media. And according to your boot rescue there, you have used your entire disk for Ubuntu, effectively wiping ...


0

Looking at Partition Start Sector End Sector # of Sectors System /dev/sda1 2,048 1,050,623 1,048,576 EFI System partition /dev/sda2 1,050,624 233,445,375 232,394,752 Data partition (Linux) /dev/sda3 233,445,376 250,068,991 16,623,616 Swap partition (Linux) and 1 disks with OS, 1 OS : 1 Linux, 0 MacOS, 0 ...


0

You could try to install lightdm gtk unity by enter in the terminal: sudo apt-get install lightdm-gtk-unity and then choose gtk, and then from software - manger install, kde plasma desktop whit remote login, and you just have to choose gtk as login, and it should have remote login.


-1

This problem happens when using automount, even if you automat a parition on your disk. I am going to wait for the next release of nautilus and hope it goes away. An alternative is to use nemo file manager. webupd8.org has the files to update you system and you can set it as the default file manager. Problem then goes away.


0

Your iMac probably has a PowerPC processor -- making it's incompatible with the x86/64 build that you'd be using on your Mac Book Air (I assume that's what MBA means). Apple didn't even start using Intel processors until about 2006. Therefore, in order to install it on an iMac you'd have to find a PowerPC build of Ubuntu. Have a look at the PowerPC FAQ on ...


0

First open gparted (if it is not installed install it by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T and entering sudo apt-get install gparted in the upcoming terminal ) and check for any ntfs partition. If you do not see one, that you probably wiped out windows when installing ubuntu. Download a windows 8 image from somewhere ...


0

It is possible to get the Timex Ironman Global Trainer to work using a Windows virtual machine under Ubuntu Linux. You do need a copy of Windows (XP in my case), or something like TinyXP (since it's just a step in the process I'll leave the ethical concerns to the user). I'll outline the process just to point anyone interested in the right direction. ...


0

You will need to load the boot menu of the BIOS to change the boot priority. While the computer is rebooting, hold down the key that gets you into the BIOS menu. On my computers, it is either F12 or F7, but it may be different for your machine (it should say which button to press on the screen as the BIOS is loading). Once you're in the BIOS menu, ...


0

Skylar, please advise how you are performing this. I'm on my phone, so I will refine at a later date. Step 1- Create the partition in Windows. In your Window's 8 OS, right click on Computer, select manage and go to disk management. From here, create the desired partition for Linux- try to make a minimum of 20GB. Step 2- Burn the ISO There are ...


1

Test this: Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: sudo -i chmod -Rf 777 /media/ray/1768-274C


1

Use this command to get some useful information about your USB drive. sudo blkid Ex output last line : /dev/sdb1: LABEL="TOSHIBA EXT" UUID="583AA2D33AA2AE06" TYPE="ntfs" use the command and note down the UUId of the USB drive The last entry is my external USB drive. Note down the UUID and TYPE of your external drive. You can make sure that your drive ...


0

Leave the password field blank and press enter.


0

It appears that using ATTRS{isProduct}=="*" will work no matter what the product ID is.


0

Write support for HFS+ in Linux is very experimental and disabled by default. You cannot write (that includes permission changes) to such a file system without jumping through some hoops and risking the integrity of your data, but I you don't need to either to perform a backup. Since the files on the OS X file system belong to another user as the default ...


0

Try, sudo su then nautilus Or sudo mv "file adress here" "destination here" in the terminal.


0

It sounds as if the USB drive is unproperly mounted (with the wrong permissions). If you are auto-mounting, this shouldn't happen. You can try manually mounting anyway. Check out this guide: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Mount/USB.


0

Well nvm, I learned why my flash drive didn't work. I tried a different one, and it worked. Now I know why the SanDisk Cruzer 16GB was so cheap. I'll just use it to install my drivers.


0

Actually, there is another way to create bootable USB drive with the "Disks" utility. All you need to do is "restore disk image" using the iso file as the source image and you're good to go. If you need more help... Open "Disks" utility. Choose the USB drive from the side. Press the little "stop" ( ■ ) button. Delete all file systems with the minus ( - ...


0

From what I see it's a technical issue with the Android OS. Certain android applications are restricted from being moved from the internal memory to your internally mounted external SD card. That's part of android's protection: your "external" SD card is no longer considered as an USB mass storage device. The reasoning popped out at me when I began to ...


0

Check this post on AskUbuntu! Here is a page on the official Ubuntu website with BitTorrent There is an option in the install process which lets you choose the partition you want to use to install Ubuntu on. Normally it's the last.


0

Everything on USB is digital. "Analog Output" describes the output of the DAC. Ubuntu's sound settings are the PulseAudio layer.


0

Was having the same problem and while looking for the AHCI compatibility setting in the bios I came across one that stated something along the lines Restrict OS installation. The options being Windows/Other. I switched over to Other and presto! Have a close look at all your bios setting as it may be this simple!


0

I had the same problem while installing a dual boot system with Win7x64 and Ubuntu 14.04. I have the same Broadcom Corp. BCM2046B1 USB 2.0 Hub as you do. I booted Windows and turned on the bluetooth adapter. After I booted Ubuntu and I saw the bluetooth. I can't explain why yet.


0

So I finally got everything sorted out. The main problem was that the keyboard got unified first which messed it up for some reason. If I removed everything and unified the mouse first and then the keyboard, everything worked. The reason it didn't work at first when I tried this was because the keyboard didn't get properly removed. Solution: 1: Install ...


0

Have a look at Plop Boot Manager. It's a very small ISO, which you can burn to CD or USB, from which you can boot it. Besides other things, it enables you to boot some devices which your BIOS can't. E.g. I use it to boot an Ubuntu USB on computers without the support of booting from USB devices. Before you boot Plop, make sure that USB Legacy Emulation is ...


4

Generic Answer: In general, all of those things are fairly well supported by popular Linux distributions such as Fedora and Ubuntu. If you wish to get a good idea of how well Ubuntu will run on your hardware prior to actually trying it, you could just use a search engine like Google or Yahoo to search specific hardware components for known ...


0

PulseAudio is used on top of ALSA to manage applications use of your onboard soundcard. However, it is not preloaded in a standard Lubuntu install. To get PulseAudio open your terminal and type sudo apt-get install pavucontrol


0

Seems the first warning is not a severe one but the second one related to shared library is. You can manually download the package containing the shared library and then delete all the files related to the installation and then try to install again. To do so run the following commands successively: sudo apt-get install apt-file apt-file update ...


0

Audacity immediately recognized USB M-Audio with no issues, EVEN THOUGH Alsa mixer keeps on Intel internal audio card. To my knowledge alsamixer doesn't manage which application uses which interface/soundcard/output, you can only set the software controls (some may have only hardware controls and don't offer any software controls) for the devices ...


0

Alright, I got it to work. There were some glitches at first, but all was sorted out. I had to do the following: Choose "Something Else" Menu Install everything to formatted 250GB Drive Go through setup process Fix GRUB timer and default timeout choice Do a bunch of reboots for updating various files and stuff Accidental HDD unplug while shutting down Hard ...


0

Audacity uses ALSA. The default card is whatever card has been seen first. To change the order of the sound drivers, add the following lines at the end of /etc/modprobe.d/alsa-base.conf: options snd-usb-audio index=0 options snd-hda-intel index=1 and reboot.


0

I was getting "Boot Error" with usb bootable of Ubuntu 12.04. Then I repeated making the image again and tried in another machines then realized it's my machine problem. There are a couple of posting about this issue but not helped. I am not very sure what causes or 100% works this way. I just played around the usb setting in bios. Then it worked. My ...


1

Remove the line sudo su. It starts a new root shell that never returns and that is why any command after that is not being executed. On top of that granting yourself a permission to do sudo su without password is a serious security risk and should not be done in a real world environment.


0

Boot into ubuntu Add boot repair disk Open Terminal sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo sed 's/trusty/saucy/g' -i /etc/apt/sources.list.d/yannubuntu-boot-repair-trusty.list sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair Run Boot Repair Application Select Recommended repair option Reboot and select OS you want This will ...


1

Make sure you have your bios set to boot to the USB first. Good luck, lemme know... Sometimes it's the simple things ya know?


0

what do you mean by "when i insert USB" and be specific on "doesn't work" Do you insert USB first and then Power the laptop or Do you Power uplaptop first then insert USB? IF 1: check your BIOS at start up[powerup while pressing f11 or find suitable for your laptop] THEN: set up boot-up drive properly


0

If you're using the same USB you used to install Windows with to try and boot Ubuntu Live CD are you sure you formatted it before burning the ISO on it?


0

With Ubuntu 12.04 I could not connect to my vanilla Android 4.1.1 tablet as a USB storage device, to copy files between my computer and the tablet. I followed the advice here without success. Running lsusb in the computer's terminal showed that the tablet was connected as a device (and the USB cable was probably OK), but gMPT reported 'unable to open raw ...


0

I have had a similar issue with a SD card, and Gparted, Testdisk or DD were unable to help me. Fortunately, I had an Android Phone next by. I put the SD Card in it, and had "this SD card is damaged, to use it, you need to format it". I accepted the format option... and voila ! Done. Now the card works as it always worked.


0

I had to disable secure boot and change to legacy boot instead of efi. After this it read the usb without issues.


0

You can use inequality for exceptions: ACTION=="add", DRIVERS=="usb-storage", ATTRS{idVendor}!="054c", RUN+="/bin/sh -c 'echo 0 >/sys%p/authorized'"


0

Try rebooting the computer with the drive plugged in. I'd given up on using the drive with Ubuntu and purely by chance I'd left the drive plugged in when I rebooted. It's never shown up when I've plugged it in while booted up but showed up immediately after a reboot. It's a 1TB WD USB 3.0 drive.


1

Here, I got my USB3 ports stopped working after a while. Only a restart fixes the problem. After some research, I've found that a lot of USB3 ports presents a power management problem on a lot of different hardwares and OSs. You can find people reporting this kind of problem on Windows, Linux, etc. So, I've disabled USB power management, and now everything ...


0

I tried both sudo usermod -a -G dialout $USER #(worked perfectly) And sudo chmod 666 /dev/ttyUSB0 (worked but had to type the command again) I also removed the mode manager but did not really help. Therefore, the best command that worked for me was sudo usermod -a -G dialout $USER


0

Several years ago, I experienced a hard drive failure. I was at work when my laptop suddenly started to act particularly strange. First, I thought it was because I had too many windows open and the RAM was full, but when the problems persisted after a reboot, I knew it was more than that. I immediately started to back up recent files. About half an hour ...


0

It turns out that the working laptop used to download ISO files and create the Live USB thumb drives has bad ram. This more than likely has been the cause of all ISO files failing MD5sum checks and subsequent live USB failing to install to HDD. Thank you to everyone that helped me with this issue.



Top 50 recent answers are included