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0

I'm glad you got it. As far as wubi goes (for anyone taking a look at this): Wubi will not work will not work along side Windows 8 (which I assume you were using) as long as the system is a UEFI system. For more information you can check out https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WubiGuide


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The device descriptor read/64, error -110 means that USB port power supply was exceeded. Try again using all of the other sockets. See also http://stackoverflow.com/questions/13653692/device-descriptor-read-64-error-110 and http://superuser.com/questions/719302/trying-to-restore-data-usb-drive-not-properly-detected


0

So the error is device descriptor read/64, error -110 which is basically has something to do with power. Your laptop/desktop was not able to supply enough power to the USB. A solution that has worked for many is shutting down the system, unplug the charger and USB for 5 minutes, replug charger and USB, restart the system. See: 1) ...


1

You can download the iso here http://releases.ubuntu.com/12.04/ (the second link). In win7 in order to burn thw iso file: Insert a recordable CD, DVD, or Blu‑ray Disc into your disc burner. Open Computer by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, and then clicking Computer. In Windows Explorer, find the disc image file, and then ...


1

This link is a list of Old Ubuntu releases: Old Ubuntu Releases


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Screen must be unlocked, I did not experience USB port issues. For me, this was the critical step: The file ~/.android/adb_usb.ini on your computer is a list of valid vendorIDs that are allowed to connect. I found that list empty (or non existent, don't remember). Just add a new line with the vendorID for the MX4, you found it already: 0x2a45 I also had ...


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I'm using the following command to disable the card reader on my MBP 11.1 with Ubuntu 15.04: echo 1 > /sys/bus/usb/devices/2-3/remove In case you have another MBP revision or different Ubuntu version, you may have to use another device ID. Also, I believe that WiFi, not the card reader, is the main battery-eater, appearing to consume aroung 11-15W ...


1

The MX4 USB port is picky and unstable with USB3.0. Please try to connect to USB2.0 port or USB2.0 hub to see if it fixed your issue.


0

You can use Clonezilla. It's a great tool if you want all systems have a same copy of OS and softwares. As your requirement look like you want all alike systems. You can clone any hard disk partition or full hard disk using this utility. You will have a great choice of USB install, network install, samba server, etc. to install your cloned image to other ...


1

You have many tools that are available for Ubuntu 12.04(some of them are not used anymore for newer versions. but still works for ubuntu 12.04). relinux remastersys Ubuntu Builder System Imager And much more. I personally advise you to use Relinux. Download this version from launchpad and not the last version to use the following tutorial on it Here ...


0

Try reading the error! It says what's wrong: exit status 32: mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/sdb1, missing codepage or helper program, or other error Wrong FS type. The drive has a bad/unreadable filesystem. It's probably formatted NTFS, so try running sudo apt-get install ntfs-3g to get a native NTFS driver, or use ...


1

You need to install a driver for this dongle. Connect to internet another way and run in terminal sudo apt-get install git git clone https://github.com/abperiasamy/rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux cd rtl8812AU_8821AU_linux make sudo make install Then reboot, insert the dongle and test. If there are any errors while running comands, then post them to your question. ...


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Almost all barcode scanners will work. They'll work just like a any other USB such as keyboard, mouse, etc... All you have just to plug in and then check if Ubuntu knows it using lsusb refer to this wiki: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BarcodeReaders


-1

I skipped the whole gdisk thing as mentioned in the solution. This alone worked for me ./install.sh -–usedefault /dev/<EFI-disk-of-external-storage-where-ubuntu-is-installed>


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I have reinstalled the Ubuntu and issue has been resolved. Seems like there was some issue for first time installation.


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Select the hard drive which contains the operating system as first boot device in the hard drive group. Follow the steps below to configure the boot order on HP . Configuring the boot order: note: The boot order can be configured on the Advanced tab in the BIOS settings menu. The steps for modifying the boot order may vary depending on the model of the ...


0

I think you must have installed Grub on to the USB drive. Boot with the USB drive, open a terminal window by Ctrl-Alt-T and run: sudo grub-install /dev/sda That command assumes that /dev/sda is your first hard drive and you want to install grub there. Feel free to change this depending on your system, but in most cases this should work.


0

Download the Ubuntu Minimal Cd. The file size is only less than 30MB. From here You won’t be able to create a Usb startup disk with this iso file, so the only way is to burn it into a bootable Cd. Make sure your PC is connected to a LAN network. Insert the Cd into your Cd-Rom and boot up your computer from the Rom. Then select Install. Select the ...


1

As ndemou said, the NUT FAQ is aware of the problem, and a patch as been released, correcting the bug. But old stable distros could be affected. Hopefully, the solution is very simple... From the NUT FAQ : "My USB UPS is supported but doesn’t work!" : On Linux, udev rules are provided to set the correct permissions on device file. This allows the NUT ...


0

Same problem. I solved it connecting the hard disk to a USB 2.0 port (my computer have both: USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 ports). Probably much slower data transfer but I can live with that. Regards.


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Please have a look at this answer. It's likely that you'll resolve the issue if you follow that. http://askubuntu.com/a/484077/341965


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After running some test and actually using it, here's the command for rsync that I am happy with: rsync -aAXv –exclude={“/dev/*”,”/proc/*”,”/sys/*”,”/tmp/*”,”/run/*”,”/mnt/*”,”/media/*”,”/lost+found”, “/boot/*”} /media/sda1/* /media/sdb1/ –delete -u --dry-run If I am satisfied, I remove --dry-run to make the changes.


1

Update 1 I assume you are using rEFInd to bypass grub. One solution would be to add a manual entry to the refind.conf file. This will allow you to boot to grub from rEFInd. I assume you still have grub installed in your EFI partition. Add the following lines to the end of refind.conf. Reboot and look for "Boot Linux Ubuntu from EFI". menuentry "Linux ...


1

AMD64 image is not for AMD CPUs, but exactly what you need. 64-bit image that will work on Core i7.


0

Select the partition you want to install the system on (in this case it'll be /dev/sdb probably) and click on "change" button, then choose "/" as mount point.


0

Let's say your device is /dev/sdb1. Using lsusb get the ID of your device (it will be something like 0651:1722 or whatever) Create a script called script.sh in /lib/udev (you may have to use sudo while creating the file) and put the following lines in it: #!/bin/bash udisks --unmount /dev/sdb1 udisks --detach /dev/sdb Save it and make it executable ...


1

To merge the three parts back into the original file, just run: cat part1 part2 part3 > original Now if you are reasonably sure that the resulting file is an ISO file 1 (e.g. the splitted parts have a .iso extension), the most straightforward way to create a bootable USB drive out of it is to use dd; carefully check thrice to which block device your ...


2

I like Fabby's approach, but it is good to teach people about this bad habit (They are not working all the time on controlled machines). This is similar to an OSX feature, as described here. There is a small difference that you may use it to know if it was a safe remove: udev variable ID_PART_TABLE_TYPE=dos is set for sdx disk node (NOT partition node ...


1

If the host system has no existing swap partition, all temporary files should exist in RAM. However, if the system has an existing swap partition, files may also be written to the physical hard drive on the swap partiton. To test this, you can run the following command to show any active swap partitions currently in use as well as the ammount of memory (if ...


0

There should not be left a trace of temporary files on the hard drive. The cookies are typically stored in a dot directory for your browser in your home directory on the usb, for instance, /home/user/.mozilla in case of firefox. Unless you explicitly mount the hard drive and symlink that directory somewhere on the hard drive, you're safe. For extra security, ...


1

AFAIK temporary files are written to a /tmp directory on the USB drive and application specific stuff usually gets put into your /home directory. Unless you explicit created a persistent partition on the drive then all of this gets removed when you reboot. Based on the nature of your question it sounds like tails would be a good option for you to look ...


0

First, if the drive is not shown in fdisk, make sure it is getting enough power,if bus powered. Second, do NOT bother to format in Windows 7. Ubuntu 15 cannot properly recognize NTFS or exFAT drives formatted by Windows 7, at least the 1T SSD I have. And those were the only two choices. Instead, format to NTFS in Ubuntu. I used fdisk to create a simple ...


0

You can install Ubuntu to a USB drive easily. Get an Ubuntu Live CD of Live USB and boot it on some computer. Get a spare USB Drive (the one you want to use for booting on any computer) and plug it into the same computer from step 1. Run through the installer and select the USB drive from step 2 as the destination disk, also be sure to install GRUB onto ...


0

Are you sure this is not because of inactivity. What I would try to do would be to install the powertop package in software-center or by sudo apt-get install powertop then run sudo powertop and for all usb devices in tunables set it so it says bad while this may use a tiny bit more power it will stop the power managment from switching off usb devices. This ...


0

I had this exact same thing and this fixed it for me. Open Winusb, click the menu File -> Show all USB drives.


0

So.. you have a USB drive connected to your wireless router. I'm going to go out on a limb and assume it cannot be directly linked to the computer and it contains other folders due to lack of specification. If you can clearly see it on your folder application, try copying and pasting the required files from the USB drive to a location Videostream can see. If ...


1

GrUB will write code and data to some devices which will utterly confuse some BIOS USB code. The only thing I found which will make some of my systems not freeze is to format the first partition (e.g., /dev/sdb1) as VFAT (intending it to be used for GrUB boot. And that doesn't work for all of them, but it seems to help with some. I mean, if you don't do ...


0

Found the problem: since the machine is a laptop, turning off the feature "Disable Trackpad when typing" in settings > keyboard did the trick. Nevertheless I think this is a bug. Can anyone give me advice where to report? Thanks!


0

I had the same issue and none of the other fixes worked. What ended up working, I don't know why, was to put a program into the Windows Startup folder. In an attempt to do something I put the installer for the network driver into the startup folder, as well as putting a folder that had some items the installer needed. When I rebooted the keyboard and mouse ...


0

You should be able to without problem. There is a few utilities out there that can format and setup your USB flash or external drive. One of the most popular tools seems to be Unetbootin. You can create a bootable USB from a wide variety of distributions that will work on just about any machine. You can check it out here: http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/


0

In general it is possible to boot from USB and run from a hard disk. Install to the caddy disk, install again to another USB, and edit the USB's grub boot commands in /boot/grub/grub.cfg to point to the caddy disk. The trick will be to figure out what letter the caddy will get when there is only one USB present. See http://www.linlap.com/dell_vostro_1700 ...


1

The ISO image you burnt on the USB drive is probably an installation package, which intended to install Ubuntu in your system from an external medium (in your case a USB drive, but it could have been a CD/DVD also). The installation package allows you to try Ubuntu before installing, or use Ubuntu occasionally without a permanent installation. See ...


11

Unfortunately, that's a thing Micro$oft actually got quite right: USB removal... And you'll keep on having this problem until you: Disable auto-mounting If users have to mount manually, it'll be easier to train them to dismount as well. Create a udev rule that turns off all caching on USB disks...


0

This error message results from a couple different bugs including one mentioned earlier in this thread. It happens to me on 14.04 even with a new FAT partition. Unfortunately the fixes haven't been backported to 12.04 or even 14.04 for that matter. So, I'd recommend using UnetBootin as mentioned.


0

Please verify that you used Windows XP driver files. ndiswrapper requires XP. From man ndiswrapper-1.9: DESCRIPTION ndiswrapper is two parts: user space tool that is used to install Windows XP drivers and kernel module to load the Windows XP drivers. Both are called ndiswrapper. Is there also a file bcmwlhigh5.inf in the folder? I ...


0

Android phones uses different idProduct for each mode. Check the ones related to USB Debug mode using: Run: tail -f /var/log/kern.log Change modes from phone and record idProduct's Example, mine: MTP, idVendor=0bb4, idProduct=2008 PTP, idVendor=0bb4, idProduct=200b MTP+Debug, idVendor=0bb4, idProduct=0c02 PTP+Debug, idVendor=0bb4, idProduct=200c ...


0

Simply click at the package manager in unity on the left side (the suitcase icon), then type into search field only "usb" and look for the output or directly type in search field "udev" and install the package related to "udev" - after this and after reboot USB is supported fully.


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Get Unetbootin (http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net), plug in a USB, open UNBI, and select Ubuntu from the first dropdown. Select what version in the next dropdown (most likely, you'll want 14.04 since it's LTS) and make sure you choose the right architecture. Then click OK and it will automatically make a live USB for you. You can click the Reboot Now button ...


1

From Wikipedia A live USB is a USB flash drive or a USB external hard disk drive containing a full operating system that can be booted. Live USBs are closely related to live CDs, but sometimes have the ability to persistently save settings and permanently install software packages back onto the USB device. Like live CDs, live USBs can be used in embedded ...


2

Sounds like you've got the device configured in Serial Emulation Mode but you want it in Keyboard Emulation Mode. The manual says you need to refer to the USB section of the MetroSelect Single-Line Configuration Guide. Just to clarify, I believe this is a device configuration issue not a Ubuntu issue.



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