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There is a solution here. In summary, you have to create a HTML file and put the following code: form action = "http://192.168.0.1/goform/goform_set_cmd_process" method = "post"> <input type="checkbox" name="goformId" value="CONNECT_NETWORK" checked style="display:none;"> <BUTTON name="submit" type="submit"> Connect </BUTTON> ...


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Try rebooting your pc with the cd rom inside. Go to boot menu; make sure you format it properly. Are you using the try Ubuntu option instead of the Install option?


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In case you're trying to create a bootable Live USB drive using a specific Ubuntu version, the most straightforward way to do it in my opinion is to just write the whole image to the drive: sudo dd if=<path_to_image_to_read> of=<path_to_device_file_to_write> *<path_to_image_to_read> = path to the Ubuntu image; ...


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Your device is mounted. Your OS is using it, so it will not work correctly. Also, you need to dd to a "/dev/xda" device, and not a mount point. You will need to run: sudo umount /media/felixinx/0392-8145 Then, run blkid to find out the device, maybe it will be /dev/sdb, so run: sudo dd if=ChromeOS.img of=/dev/sdb bs=4M Should work, if not, post ...


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Try these commands in the terminal: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:langdalepl/gvfs-mtp sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade Not really sure, but it might work for you. OR you can try this too.


-1

Try Rufus https://rufus.akeo.ie Here is an video as an example https://youtu.be/8xV7gIFzk5Q


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UNetbootin can create a bootable Live USB drive. UNetbootin allows you to create bootable Live USB drives for Ubuntu, Fedora, and other Linux distributions without burning a CD. It runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. http://sourceforge.net/projects/unetbootin/files/UNetbootin/608/unetbootin-windows-608.exe/download?use_mirror=ufpr If using Windows, run ...


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why not just dd the .img file after conversion? sudo dd if=/path/to/orig.img of=/dev/s**


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You can use Your Universal Multiboot Integrator.


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It should not matter. You can use Startup Disk Creator which is pre-installed in Ubuntu.


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To the best of my knowledge, it does not matter how you format (i.e. choice of filesystem) your pendrive. If your aim is to make a bootable pendrive with e.g. Unetbootin it is probably the best to format in VFAT. Given that the pendrive is plugged into the computer and mounted (i.e. you can browse its content) you can proceed as follows from the terminal: ...


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The first link in your post also requires you to manually populate a .map file to program the n52te. The pystromo-mon.py will read the file in the .config/pystromo directory and make the n52te use those keys. Alot of trial and error on my part was needed to make it work but I have my n52 and n52 running just fine now that I know what to do. I have been in ...


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Not really, no. However, instead of disabling swappiness, you can run a script such as Zram to use compressed ram memory as swapspace instead of using a physical partition so that your system doesn't crash. STEP ONE: Execute the following command in an open terminal: sudo nano /etc/init.d/zram And copy/paste the following into the file: ### BEGIN INIT ...


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Read below first! Hi Ian, yes you could delete Swap with a live stick, but I don't recommend this. This may cause issues, depending on what OS you are using. There is a much nicer way to do that: Fire up a terminal (ctrl + alt + t), then type sudo swapoff /dev/hdb2 replace hdb2 with your swap partition directory. You can get the directory by typing sudo ...


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There appear to be a number of permissions issues with crouton, i am assuming this is causing the issues. I have installed 2 linux pen drive USB boot installers, neither work on crouton. I think there is a pared down code method to get this going, still researching myself. http://www.reddit.com/r/chromeos/comments/2c0cuu/creating_bootable_usb_on_chromeos/ ...


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It isn't the correct firmware wget https://www.dropbox.com/s/olqnqevf698lddo/fw-0a5c_216d.hcd sudo cp fw-0a5c_216d.hcd /lib/firmware/ sudo cp fw-0a5c_216d.hcd /lib/firmware/brcm/BCM43142A0-0a5c_216d.hcd sudo modprobe -r btusb sudo modprobe btusb And it should work


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Try this command: echo "on" | sudo tee /sys/bus/usb/devices/usb*/power/level You may need to redo this command after you reboot. To verify the setting is still in place after you reboot, run the following command: cat /sys/bus/usb/devices/usb*/power/level The output should say "on" and should not say "auto". If the output says "auto", you will need to ...


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Well... it isnt really an answer for your question, but I would go with another piece of software, for example: http://028499.com/how-to-install-unetbootin-on-ubuntu-14-10-or-ubuntu-14-10-mate-edition-or-linux-mint-1817/ https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/utopic/+package/unetbootin It might save you headache... relevant topics: ...


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I don't think that your older Macbook Air is supported although it does have an Intel CPU so you might be able to get the 32-bit version to work. Sources: Compatibility: http://releases.ubuntu.com/15.04/ Specifications: http://www.anandtech.com/show/4512/the-2011-macbook-air-specs-and-details


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Try to create the new partition table using parted from the command line: sudo parted /dev/sdb mklabel msdos Then you can just try to create the partition and the filesystem using Gparted. If it doesn't work, create the partition table and the partition using parted from the command line: sudo parted /dev/sdb mklabel msdos mkpart primary 2048s 100% ...


1

Just adding my 2 cents because I was also struggling with this and my solution was really weird. Fresh install of ubuntu 14.04.2 64-bit with all updates installed. Connected phone with usb 2.0 port: no access (I tried 2 different usb 2.0 ports) Connected phone with usb 2.0 port and used gMTP (ubuntu software center): access Connected phone with usb 3.0 ...


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Try Switching off UEFI and change to 'Compatibility" mode in the BIOS to see if it helps.(This may slow the boot of Windows unfortunately) If not try this link which may help. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI Good luck and ask for more help if necessary


0

What I understand, is that your computer is not starting from the USB device. Did you set in your BIOS to boot from USB? Did you burn the image on the USB device the right was or did you just copy the iso like a file to the USB device? What do you mean by: It boot into Grub? Grub is the bootloader. Which Grub? On your harddisc or from USB?


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Run these commands: VBoxManage list usbhost ## command 1 VBoxManage list vms ## command 2 With the information from these two commands, run the following: VBoxManage usbfilter add 0 -target <vmsnumber> -name <[0000]> -action hold -active yes -vendorid <0x0000> -productid <0x0000> replacing the <> items with their ...


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Run these commands: VBoxManage list usbhost ## command 1 VBoxManage list vms ## command 2 With the information from these two commands, run the following: VBoxManage usbfilter add 0 -target <vmsnumber> -name <[0000]> -action hold -active yes -vendorid <0x0000> -productid <0x0000> replacing the <> items with their ...


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I had to add a compiler flag to the EXTRA_CFLAGS variable in the Makefile, like so: EXTRA_CFLAGS = -DEXPORT_SYMTAB -Wno-error=date-time Possibly there are better ways to do this. If you want the ethernet to work, look here: https://github.com/geoffreytran/AX88179_178A.


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A got it working by dd, even though I don't know, if data is written the same. So, if /dev/sda is your ssd and /dev/sdb is your USB key, you can do a simple dd, just like: dd if=/dev/sdb of=/dev/sda You have to make correction with gparted (from a CD/DVD) to make it working correctly and expand the given space. I made it on several machines. I remember ...


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No, a bootloader needs to exist just in the device selected by the BIOS. So as long as the BIOS selects a device containing a bootloader, such bootloader will be able to boot any OS on any device. If your USB device has a bootloader installed in it, that's enough to be able to boot the OS on the USB device itself (and to boot any other OS present in the ...


1

Using a Logitech wireless? The 3.19 kernel used in 15.04 doesn't have built in support anymore. Find a wired keyboard and log in. Edit /etc/initramfs-tools/modules and add hid-logitech-hidpp on a new line. Save and exit. From the console run sudo update-initramfs -u reboot.


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For anyone having trouble with this, I found a simple solution which works if you are sure that the USB stick is properly formatted to NTFS and is mounted. Start by finding the name of the mounted disk by running sudo fdisk -l. Once you find it (it'll be something like /dev/sdc1), run the command based winusb command: sudo winusb --install <iso path> ...


0

USB host controllers are PCI devices, so you can view them with lspci. Look for 'xHCI' which is USB3: $ lspci | grep USB 00:14.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family USB xHCI Host Controller (rev 04) 00:1a.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family USB Enhanced Host Controller #2 (rev 04) 00:1d.0 ...


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The duplicate answer has most of what's necessary. Comments welcome. Plug it in to get the ids: lsusb replace the ids and tell it what scripts. ACTION=="add", ATTRS{idVendor}=="09da", ATTRS{idProduct}=="0260", OWNER="{userid}", RUN+="/usr/local/bin/usb-copy-add.sh" ACTION=="remove", ATTRS{idVendor}=="09da", ATTRS{idProduct}=="0260", OWNER="{userid}", ...


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The must simple is to use disk utility , to format your 4 GB USB in Fat 32 ( if you use windows and / Or Linux OS ) . Then, use Unetbootin on your OS and add bootable flash drive when you load yours files . Wait the end , and you can use your bootable disk / USB drive everywhere . Best regards of France


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I made a bootable flashdrive using a windows netbook and the program at this webpage. This worked great for me. I have used it to install on a few computers as well as running Ubuntu Live from the stick itself.


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you can use this software usbip and this is how to setup the software and use it on both the server and client side Notes: In this tutorial use the server server1.example.com with IP 192.168.0.100 and client client1.example.com with IP 192.168.0.101, both running Ubuntu These settings might differ for you, so you have to replace them where appropriate. ...


1

That loader before was not the Windows bootloader; it was the BIOS boot device selection. As soon as the computer turns on, start pressing Esc repeatedly, until the boot menu comes up.


0

Did you try to enable USB 2.0 as in this photo


0

You need to boot using the nomodeset parameter. It seems to be a graphic card issue. Repeatedly press the Left Shift while your computer boots. When you are on the Boot Menu, press F6. Select nomodeset. Press Escape and select what you want to do from the menu.


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Not all of the information is loaded into RAM. If you pull the drive Ubuntu will stop working because the commands are still on the USB drive. I just tested this out, and I am replying to this without my USB drive in the system and it is working fine while I am still in the Try Ubuntu. On your USB drive, modify boot/grub/grub.cfg and add toram to the ...


0

Don't do it. Even if everything gets copied to RAM (which is highly unlikely), There is always going to be a time when the installation reads from the media. I have observed my USB stick flashing during the installation, so even if it's not copying anything, it might be reading certain files (ones that don't get installed). If you want to install Ubuntu on ...


1

It worked. I did a sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get update --fix-missing then rebooted the system and everything seems to be working properly Thanks for the help guys!


0

according to this LINK this is a kind of hardware error due to high temperature . can you try the solution to shutdown the PC and leave it till it cools up and tr again


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Try this: Make your script: make a new text document and put this in: #!/bin/sh mkdir -p /path/to/custom-mount sudo umount /dev/sdaX ((This is the drive you want to mount in the custom location)) sudo mount -t filesystem-type -o rw /dev/sdaX /path/to/custom-mount Put this script under /etc/init.d. Make it executable by running sudo chmod -x ...


0

I got Ubuntu to boot without much effort. Make a bootable usb stick of Ubuntu 14.10. Use Rufus(Windows) or Startup Disk Creator(Ubuntu). Copy this file (bootia32.efi) to /EFI/BOOT directory on the usb stick. Turn Secure Boot off in the BIOS. Boot from the usb stick. This should boot Ubuntu 14.10 without any other issues. For further info check this ...


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You can use one of the following commands to get information details about mounted devices: all different commands are used to getting different information in different manners, results ... dmesg sudo fdisk OR sudo fdisk -l sudo blkid lsblk mount lsusb usb-devices df -h


0

See Installing Ubuntu on a Pre-Installed Windows 8 (64-bit) System (UEFI Supported). There are some BIOS settings that have been known to interfere with booting from a USB drive on computers the came with Windows 8 preinstalled. They are: Secure Boot, Quick Boot/Fast Boot, Intel Smart Response Technology (SRT) and Fast Startup. UNetbootin does not support ...


0

I think the easier way to do this is either use a Linux Image that allows for persistence, or you need to do this with the use of a CD/DVD/USB and a Separate USB stick. This way the Kubuntu install doesn't get upset when you are running gparted to edit the partition structure. Universal USB Installer(for Windows) allows for persistence with certain images. ...


0

I would try the option. "Try Ubuntu without installing" them inside that you can see if it works and install Ubuntu in a cleaner interface. Or I would try Pen drive Linux http://www.pendrivelinux.com Though I usually recommend unetbootin.


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I don't understand French, but Unetbootin appears to be failing. Am I right? I'd recommend using Rufus to burn the ISO to a flash drive. It's worked perfectly for me.


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I've heard of this problem a few times before, but it's pretty rare, and I'm not sure of the cause. My first suggestion is to disable Fast Startup in Windows. Note that this is not the same as "fast boot" or similar options in the firmware. The Windows feature turns shutdowns into suspend-to-disk operations, which results in all mounted filesystems (often ...



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