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Well, it's been several days since I removed a short USB cable extension I had connected from the computer's USB-2 port to the cable from the old passive USB hub, and through several reboots and suspends, I've had no more problems I hope this might be helpful for others, as I've seen a bunch of very similar, or even duplicate, situations both here and ...


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You need to go into the BIOS and change a setting on the usb boot option, so that the bios emulates it as a harddrive, it will then show up as C: to the installer. And when you select boot device you choose to boot from a harddrive with the name of your usb stick.


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If you turned off secure boot then you can try on Legacy boot.i Don't know much about Asus BIOS options.but there may be some option other than "pressing F2" key, which can be used to choose LEGACY BOOT options which shown at the boot time(like F12).from that you can directly choose your usb drive and boot from it.try that. also this link may be helpful. ...


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I initially thought it is the way I created the USB drive. I switched to Rufus and it worked. But I then realized it is the USB controller within the Mac Pro. It turns out that one can only install Ubuntu from 1 of the 4 USB ports. Any other port leads to errors reading the USB key, thus the error I saw earlier. For the one success, I just happened to use ...


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I had the same problem and solved it by disabling the power management feature. Just follow the troubleshooting section over here Gilad


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From the data sheet: One Button Security Setup Compatible with Wi-Fi Protected Setup™ (WPS), TL-WN823N features Quick Security Setup that allows users to almost instantly setup their security simply by pressing the WPS button to automatically establish a WPA2 secure connection, more secure than WEP encryptions. Not only is this faster than ...


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2.2 TB ≈ 2 TiB, which corresponds to the largest number of 512-byte blocks addressable by 32 bits (232 × 512 B = 232 × 29 B = 241 = 2 × 10244 B = 2 TiB). I suspect that your USB-to-ATA bridge doesn't support more blocks or larger blocks, because it's cheap and/or old. Does your storage drive allow you to set the block size to 4 KiB (Advanced Format)? Many ...


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The problem is that apple has a proprietary boot manager. When you installed to your USB drive, Ubuntu tried to make some changers to the boot manager, which Apple happily ignored. Here's what you need to do: Boot into OSX. If you are working with an apple machine, DO NOT run this in anything but OSX. Download rEFInd. You can find it on sourceforge. ...


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The partition table might have become corrupted. You can check this with fdisk: fdisk -l /dev/sdb If fdisk output shows a message like this: This doesn't look like a partition table Probably you selected the wrong device. and you don't wish to keep the data in it, you can try formatting it with gparted: sudo gparted /dev/sdb


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Assuming that the drive hardware is functional, you should start with a file-system check. Open a terminal with CTRLALTT or your preferred method. Issue the command: sudo fsck /dev/sdb1 If prompted to repair, do so. If you get: No such file or directory while trying to open /dev/sdb1 Possibly non-existent device? Refer to @DavidFoerster comment "Your ...


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It turned out that motherboard is probably too old (Asus P4P800) and isn't giving enough power to the cable. Hitting lsusb kept showing the printer until the printing was done, so probably the final communication was killing the connection. Old motherboard seems to be the culprit because plugging USB hub with external power supply (acting as sort of ...


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Go to your sound settings and mute the microphone input.


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I'm not entirely sure on reboot command, however I do know for sure that shutdown -P now will perform automatic umount on system shutdown. References aren't provided. But you can just trust strangers on the internet. EDIT: Just found this reference, maybe more strangers agreeing with me will provide you with more confidence.


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While you might do some work with Viking reviewing .gpx files for transfer to and from the Etrex 30, you will not get it to work with FoxtrotGPS as a live gps device. It doesn't have the ability to stream data, and FoxtrotGPS uses gpsd to stream the data to itself. I think it might be the wrong device for what you might be wanting to do. If, and why, it ...


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There is currently a confirmed open bug reported in March last year (2014) that is probably causing your problem. READ HERE In the bug report are many users reporting they have Nouveau or Nvidia drivers installed, so it might or might not be related to this. There are workarounds, none of them acceptable.But i would turn-off the sleep function for the time ...


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I just had a similar issue when trying to dual boot windows 7 with Ubuntu 14.04 and after several problems, I finally figured out that the HDD was dying when in the windows drive selection part of the setup showed one of the disks offline. I'm no expert but if your drive is old enough, that may be a possibility. I've seen a couple of threads on forced ...


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That should be possible from BIOS. Another option is to write a udev rule to unbind any USB root hub driver: ohci-pci (USB 1.1), ehci-pci (USB 2.0). I don't have any USB 3.0 but I think it's driver is xhci-pci. Create new rules file sudo nano /etc/udev/rules.d/90-disable-usb.rules Add this rule line DRIVERS=="?hci-pci", RUN+="/bin/sh -c 'echo -n %k ...


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If you want to disable the entire USB hub so that no mice, keyboards, USB sticks whatever can be used, just do a: lsmod | grep usb and blacklist all modules that contain usb in the first column. I'm sorry? Mice and stuff still need to work? Oh! Only blacklist usb_storage then! ;-)


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found answer on android.stackexchange.com by user @Rat2000 on AskUbuntu.com: Open a terminal in Ubuntu(Ctrl+Alt+T) and type this commands: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:langdalepl/gvfs-mtp sudo apt-get update Then, launch Software Updater (previously known as Update Manager) and install the available updates. After you update everything restart ...


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Not sure if this works on 13.10 but the method below works fine on 14.04. sudo apt-get install python libusb-1.0-0-dev git clone https://github.com/walac/pyusb cd pyusb && sudo python setup.py install


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Not sure that this is the right "ASK" for your question, but give the following a try, Sounds better than BartPE, (I have not tried it): http://www.easyuefi.com/wintousb/ Edit: Oops, did not see the above comment concerning the Lifehacker post.


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If he is plugging in a USB, whether is is set up U3 or as a HID device, I believe it will always show up in dmesg. As far as an unplug alert, you would essentially follow these udev rule instructions, substituting "add" for "remove"


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Not sure why it wouldn't work with the tools you mention. Could be that the USB is faulty. If you don't care about the data and you just want to make it useable again, you could wipe the partition table and start from scratch. sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/USB_DRIVE bs=512 count=4096 conv=fsync What this does it to flash all zeroes to the beginning of ...


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What happened is GRUB, which is the bootloader (what allows Ubuntu on your hard drive to boot), was installed to your USB INSTEAD of your hard disk. How to Fix: Turn off your computer and plug your USB back in. Turn on your computer. Now, when a login prompt shows up, press CTRL + ALT + F1 to enter a TTY Session. Now, it'll show a prompt like this: ...


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I wish you could turn a flash drive into a hard drive :P But however you could use a usb for steam games (I think), all you have to do is create a soft link. Run this command replacing {YOUR_USERNAME} with your username and {YOUR_USB_PATH} with where your usb is mounted: ln -s {YOUR_USB_PATH}/Steam /home/{YOUR_USERNAME}/.local/share/Steam WARNING: This ...


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First, I suggest you blacklist the driver for the internal device. From a terminal: sudo -i echo "blacklist iwl4965" >> /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf exit Detach the ethernet as Network Manager will prefer it to wireless. Reboot. Is the USB wireless working? If not, please edit your question to add the result of: lsusb dmesg | grep 8192 ...


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If you are still able to boot from CD, I would recommend downloading RescaTux or Gparted Live (http://gparted.org/livecd.php), and repairing your partitions. If you have a spare computer, you may be able to boot Gparted Live from USB and attempt the repair. The problem seems to be a corrupted partition table, and the only fix I know is to manually repair by ...


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First of all: don't use fdisk -l any more. It's deprecated as it doesn't support GPT. Use parted --list from now on. Then, you've very probably run into something called security through obscurity: the manufacturer of the device needs some space to hide its firmware but still making it accessible for its update process... There are a number of ways to ...


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You should be able to install Ubuntu on the HDD (partitions for / and swap, maybe also /home or whatever you want to separate), but create a separate /boot partition on the USB drive and also install the GRUB bootloader there. You then should be able to plug in your USB and select it as boot device from your BIOS/UEFI menu. But the other partitions would ...


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I cannot vouch for this particular USB stick as the technical specifications do not give any information whether this is an SLC or MLC stick. However If you go into any electronics store and order and SLC USB stick (they're normally not on stock) go for it as an SLC stick is basically a small SSD hard drive on a stick! See also this Q&A and choose user ...


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OK, lets do the math; Size 64 GB Write speed 50 MB/s No of writes 10000 to 100000. 64GB x 10000 / 0.05 GB/s = 12800000s or 417 eight hour days 64GB x 100000 / 0.05 GB/s = 128000000s or 4167 eight hour days Of course it is only written to a small percentage of the time and reading is not detrimental to the drive, so the above figures are an absolute ...


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I also have a PC that cannot boot from USB3. What I did was installed the Grub and /Boot to a USB2 Stick and then the rest of Ubuntu to an USB3 stick. By boot I press the F12 key for choosing to boot from the USB2 stick and from the boot menu there choosing any other installed system including Ubuntu. I sure hope this helps.


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I have exact the same model. I almost threw the scanner away because of this problem. After years, I finally found the solution. It's right on the their website: http://www.zebex.com/supportsservices/Faq_Scanning_BarcodeReading.html How do I correct the problem where data is outputted incorrectly only when the scanner is connected via USB port? ...


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Depending on what you are trying to do, I am guessing what it looks like to me that when you are done with the drive you want to keep it plugged in but not mounted. So what I would advise you to do is to open the menu and search "Disks" (Ubuntu 14.04/10) if your disk is there, instead of clicking Safely remove I would just click on the pause button on that ...


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Running hdparm -y /dev/sdb as root will cause the disk to stop spinning. If anything access the disk, it will spin up again. The man page suggest this is only useful for IDE drives. However I have tested that it does work with a USB drive attached to a Dell running 14.04. The man page says the command will usually cause the drive to spin down, which ...


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Unless you absoutely need to install Ubuntu to a USB, don't do it. Instead install to HDD/SSD. You'll probably kill the USB very quickly from journal writes [if not disabled] and from writing thousands of small files. As for the actual install, I would have 2 USBs, one small (2-4GB recommended) and the 64GB USB. Dump the installer on the small USB, and ...


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I have three equally valid solutions from which you can take your pick. My personal solution is to buy a use hub featuring a power switch for each port. I find it amazingly handy. If I recall, it cost only about $6 on amazon. I'll see if I can find you the item for sale before I post this, but it is enough to tell you such an affordable device exists. ...


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If your desktop does something fishy, you cal always fallback on the terminal. sudo umount /dev/sdXY # (this will umount, it will complain on opened files, if so lsof and see which ones.) sudo sync # ( this flushes all buffers to disk. It will ensure that no data is lingering in ram.) sudo eject /dev/sdX # ( this works on dvd/cds and some, not all usb ...


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Unplug the USB cable should do it. If not, then plug it back in and safely remove it again until it stays off.


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It doesn't make sense to use an expensive 64GB USB 3.0 flash drive for a full installation of Ubuntu due to the limited read/write cycles as you mentioned. All you need for it is an inexpensive 16GB USB flash drive. How do I install Ubuntu to a USB key? (without using Startup Disk Creator).


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It will create a new device, /dev/ttyUSB0 (or a higher number if that already exists). You can use that like any other file / pipe, depending on what exactly is connected. You will likely need sudo privileges to talk to it, but see this for the fix. You can see in dmesg, where the device was connected, which port was created.


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If you want, you can even fix that in windows, run cmd as administrator then type diskpart list disk select disk 1 (make sure its the right one) clean (if it complains about permission, just type clean again) then just make new volume in disk management, right click on computer -> manage ->disk management


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apparently fat16 isn't a mountable format? It can be read with windows and my macbook. I can easily mount a fat32 8 gb stick. I think a reformat is in order.


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This is easy to fix. Merely open GParted, you may need to install it if it is not installed. Then right click on the 2 Mb FAT partition and select Resize/Move. You can expand that partition into the 15 Gb of Free Space.


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You have to remove partition 1 and system Partition 2 ; Then you can create a new 16GB partition and format it as you like Don't you see that there is a 16GB free space unformatted at the end


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The best application for making a bootable Ubuntu live USB from Ubuntu is the built-in Startup Disk Creator application because it is the most reliable of all such applications. The best application for making a bootable Ubuntu live USB from Windows is Universal USB Creator. The official ubuntu.com website recommends using Universal USB Creator over ...


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I would recommend using DD from command line like sudo dd if=/path/to/file.iso of=/dev/USB_DRIVE this works like a charm and comes preinstalled with most systems.


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Depends, did you install ubuntu aside windows (AKA, do you see grub2 bootloader), then you shouldn't worry. Otherwise you clicked Try Ubuntu, and then you didn't install ubuntu. If you replaced windows 7, then you have no need for the usb-stick when booting. Keep the usb-stick around though! You need it to fix boot problems or if you want to partition ...


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If your using the USB to install on its own or alongside windows, no, you just need it for the installation. If your installing alongside windows, just make sure to select that option when you get to the partition section of install. Now if your referring to just running Ubuntu on the USB using persistence (to keep your changes) then yes, the usb would ...


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Your USB stick definitely has a physical defect, so you have to go and replace it. It looks like a memory cell at some position around 3GB has died. This is not repairable at all (especially not by software)! You can see this because the dd command you used should just write 00h (all bits to zero) to every memory cell on your device, without caring about ...



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