New answers tagged

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oh, I followed your journey as well and I cannot get symlink to work even after I added 'S' after. It took me ages to find that you have to use the rules from the device itself (without an 'S'), or one SINGLE parent... I referenced 2 levels of parents so I failed to create the symlink.. Just to share with other guys who happened to have a similar case with ...


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1) Go into /dev/input/ and query the input devices that are most likely to correspond to your mouse, with the terminal cmd: $ udevadm info --query=all --name=/dev/input/yr-device-file-name You will be able to identify it using the two environment variables (env-var) ID_VENDOR_ID=1532 MODEL_ID=0016 per your question (depending on yr device, the 2nd ...


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The same thing happened to me, and I was also puzzled why one flash drive worked and the other one, a SanDisk Cruzer Blade USB flash drive, didn't. I solved the problem by reformatting the SanDisk USB flash drive with the FAT32 filesystem format that it had when it was new. I used GParted from the Ubuntu Software Center to reformat the flash drive.


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First, if the computer shipped with Windows 10, do not enable the Compatibility Support Module (CSM; aka "legacy boot"); doing so just complicates the boot path and creates new problems. Disabling Secure Boot will not help, either; given the error message you got, your problem is clearly beyond the point where Secure Boot could be causing it. Second, it ...


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It seems to be a bug in the gparted section of the installation. There must be something wrong with the unencrypted swap area checker. If it jumps on (and it will do so to ruin your day), it's gonna say: 'unsecure swap area detected, aborting now'. And it will detect an unencrypted swap area, even if there really is one. So... Solution: 1) Start (L)ubuntu ...


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My computers have lots of RAM, so I never have seen swap space being used to supplement it. I do use hibernate often so I still define more swap space than I have RAM. Never noticed this slowing down my computer, but have never tried benchmarking it. Are you sure using swap space actually slows you down.


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on windows download the ubuntu iso image you want to try,, download win 32 disk imager, use win 32 disk imager to write the iso image to the usb stick you wish to use, this usb will be overwritten of any info you have on it turn off computer plug in usb and turn back on, press f2 f12 or during bios load to choose boot from usb if you computer does not ...


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If you're wanting to just have an Ubuntu recovery boot stick (ie: you don't plan to actually customise a genuine Ubuntu installation and just use it for administering Windows boxes when they break), then I highly recommend downloading the Rufus tool for Windows which will allow you to turn almost any ISO into a bootable USB stick. If you wish to have a ...


2

First of all: a warning as you're saying: the stick is a bit of bottle neck since it only have one chip. Which makes me suppose you're using an MLC USB stick. These sticks are slow and prone to errors, so one day in the near future, you're going to wake up and find that you've got no system at all and all of your data is lost, as HDDs die a slow, ...


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Open a terminal and execute this command : sudo usermod -G vboxsf -a $USER Now the guest should detect the USB device. Update addressing the circumstance that you have chosen the wrong repository for VirtualBox : Open Software & Updates -> Other Software -> Highlight the VirtualBox entry - click on Remove. Reload to update the ...


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Deleted files (Trashbin active) live in a hidden folder: In Windows it is called $Recycled In Linux it is named .Trash-1000 ( the 1000 is my userID if you have more users there will be more files with growing numbers) Deleting files move them to this library, emptying the Trash deletes them from this library permanently (sort of). Deleting from a foreign OS ...


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I also have the late 2015 Dell XPS 13. The jack is Intel's new multi-purpose connector. It is an integrated USB-C and Thunderbolt 3. So you can use a dongle that operates on either standard. (I'm not allowed to comment or I would put this there).


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You Can always try using fdisk Open a terminal (Ctl+ALt+t) and type sudo fdisk /dev/sdy where /dev/sdy = The device file for your flash drive. Once you get fdisk open, type p to list the partition table, Once you know where it is located you can use d # to delete it. (# = The partition; ExAMPLE d 1, d 2) w writes the partition table back to the disk and ...


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I had come against this problem before. I usually use Rufus for USB images and when I create a bootable disk using ISO images for Ubuntu Server, it breaks at mounting CD/ROM device stage but when I change it to DD Image it works.Hope it helps. Rufus DD Image Option


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Never mind. Seems as if it was the Universal-USB-Installer's fault. Tried Unetbootin and it works now.


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My issue was somewhat resolved after I placed it from USB3 to USB2. If happens again, for me it helped at least, just reset your pc and you will be able to use it until shutdown for sure.


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I strongly suspect, but do not know for certain, that you've installed Ubuntu in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode, and that you've got an EFI/UEFI-mode Windows installation. Such dual-mode installations always complicate matters, and should be avoided. Unfortunately, avoiding them takes some general EFI know-how that is, as yet, not as common as it needs to be. Another ...


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The easiest GUI way to see this is to just run the Disks program and all mounted disks will show up. SD cards looked like /dev/mmcblk followed by a single integer, a p for partition, and another single integer for partition number. If the SD card is not already setup in /etc/fstab, let's say your username is jim (like mine), it will mount under /mnt/jim/ ...


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You can check your USB devices with e.g. lsusb -t. There should also be listed which driver is in use and at which speed the devices are connected. It seems like the driver is built in the kernel. But you can check that with the following command. When the setting is y, it is built in the kernel. grep -i xhci /boot/config-$(uname -r) The _PLATFORM ...


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I cannot comment yet. Have you seen this post? It seems to deal with the same problem that comes from a version mismatch.


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I have something similar. I never see grub. However, if I get the BIOS boot menu, I can choose either Windows or Linux. You may also need to disable safeboot in the BIOS. When your machine first comes on it should tell you which key to press to get BIOS settings. F10, F12, del or something.


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There is a section of your HHD that is the boot area. The information in there will dictate the boot steps. If you installed Ubuntu along with Windows then you need to install GRUB from ubuntu to the boot manager. That will handle our chioce of win or ubuntu. You will need to boot the live disk and either fully reinstall or install grub from there. Open a ...


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for sure that is not a problem of available space. Seems that for some reason your installation image is not correct. The message on the bottom says, that installer cannot find /dev/sdc device containing installation image. You mentioned about 2 SDDs in RAID mode. My guess is following: hardware RAID under windows is recognized as single drive (which is ...


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You need to upgrade your kernel to 4.2. Connect to internet by wire or some other adapter and run in terminal: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install linux-generic-lts-wily linux-firmware and reboot.


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I figured out how to do this: Install GParted and plug on your USB drive. Once you opened GParted click the button on the upper-right corner, and select /dev/sdb. Right click on the bar that says /dev/sdb1 and click "unmount". Hover over "format to", then click ntfs. Open the terminal and write sudo mkdir /media/flash. Open GParted and repeat ...


0

As an alternative to waiting, add the boot parameter nomodeset to grub during boot. This can be done by pressing e on the grub menu entry and then inserting nomodeset on the Linux line. This seems to be a problem caused by the most recent kernel and Nouveau, not Ubuntu.


1

I had this issue, and my efi partition was full. I think this caused the issue because installation always stopped at that drive, and displayed the initramfs prompt as stated in this issue. I tried many of the fixes on this page and many other pages. It took days to figure out which fix would work. I finally created a USB boot drive on my WIN 10 machine ...


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in case YUMI doesn't work - try universal usb installer it worked for me always from Windows. Please double check your .iso file whether it has been downloaded properly or not?


0

Check out my little project to create a shell script to automatically apply powertop's "good" power settings. You can then easily edit the resulting script to comment out any configuration that's giving you trouble and run it instead of sudo powertop --auto-tune.


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You have literally typed /path/to/ as part of your command? Do directories of that name exist on your system? You are meant to replace those words with the actual location of the file...


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Following shell script do the job for me. #!/bin/sh DEVICE=$(udisksctl status | grep -i "WD Elements" | xargs echo | cut -d' ' -f6) udisks --unmount /dev/$(echo $DEVICE)1 sudo udisksctl power-off --block-device /dev/$DEVICE It is actually combination of ideas from posts of both @Serg and @Fabby.


0

I would recommend downloading a new version of Ubuntu, and downloading Rufus. Rufus creates bootable USB sticks with whatever ISO you put on it. You get to choose whether or not it is bootable, and it will format the stick for you before hand. There is not another way to run the installer from the USB that I am aware of. If you can get a new ISO this would ...


0

In general it's always a good idea to have a fresh USB drive made bootable. If you simply copy and past, if for any reason a program had written files to the drive it could corrupt your install. Unless you are copying from a stock folder from your desktop. I use Rufus to create my bootable USB drives. You can chose your format and the program will also ...


0

Connect to internet by wire and run sudo add-apt-repository ppa:hanipouspilot/rtlwifi sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install rtlwifi-new-dkms This will install a better driver. Test after reboot.


3

Open up "startup disk creator". Plug in your USB pendrive. Click to erase all data on the device. Exit startup disk creator. Unplug the device and plug it back in and you should now be able to use the device. This also works after using dd. Alternatively, I'm pretty sure you can do this to reformat the drive: warning, this will delete all content on ...


0

I found the USB to Serial (RS232) adapter was the cause of the issue. Mixed with the long cable run it was going into a never ending restart which caused a kernal panic. I am not quite sure why but a better Adapter solved all the issues.


0

The first partition on a Persistent flash drive is FAT32, it is the only partition visible to Windows. You can access data on this partition while the drive is plugged into a Windows computer. If you need to access data stored on this partition while booted from the flash drive, you can find it at filesystem/cdrom.


0

It might be worth to try using rufus instead of unetbootin.


0

I engaged the exact procedure that you propose without incident. As I recall, I was able to do this with PNY, SanDisk and Cruzer. However, in the process of using several USB flashdrives for perhaps a dozen installs, some of which were reinstalls, I encountered mixed performace from various USB sticks.Some of them have been retired as unusable, but when ...


2

SOLVED: moved the command back one level... root@blackserver:/sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1a.0# echo -n 1 > remove dmesg output now... [65207.355668] ehci-pci 0000:00:1a.0: remove, state 4 [65207.355680] usb usb3: USB disconnect, device number 1 [65207.355682] usb 3-1: USB disconnect, device number 2 [65207.360110] ehci-pci 0000:00:1a.0: USB bus 3 ...


1

I had a problem similar to this where my front USB ports wouldn't detect anything except a mouse... It turned out I Needed to turn of USB legacy support in the BIOS. Another thing to look at is that the cable is plugged into the motherboard, its easy to knock a cable loose inside your case. Have these ports ever worked, like with other OS's or is this the ...


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I was finally able to get wireless working by reading and rereading posts at this site: http://ubuntuforums.org/archive/index.php/t-1964173.html as chili555 worked with another user. I think by removing and reinserting the USB transceiver allowed it to make the connection. On reboot, I did have to reinsert the USB device once again to get a connection. ...


0

My MadCatz fightstick (1bad:f03a) works fine in Steam's Big Picture Mode out of the box on 14.04. Looks like a X360 controller ≠ official X360 controller "logic3 in lsusb" doesn't look like an official controller made and sold by Micosoft for the Xbox 360. Most drivers and software use the USB IDs to detect devices that they are compatible with. If your ...


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The error you are seeing indicates the filesystem is not clean and needs checked by Windows chkdsk. There are components to NTFS filesystem ($MFT and $MFTMirr respectively in this case) which say what is where on the disk. These files no longer match each other, which suggests there may be some type of filesystem corruption. But because it is NTFS, the ...


0

You don't say what tool you used to create your USB drive. This is a critical detail because not all boot programs are created equal. Rufus and Unetbootin usually work well for creating EFI-bootable media, but this varies somewhat from one computer to another, so even if you used one of those you might try something else. Another option is to install in ...


2

This sometimes happen due to corrupted partition table. To repair it just create a new partition table. This can be done by opening Gparted then navigating to Devices > Create partition table


1

The one and only supported way to "burn" an ISO image to a USB drive (memory stick) is the "USB Creator" tool aka "Startup Disk Creator". It basically does some conversion and then copies the stuff onto the USB device. Be warned that the USB device content will be wiped as a result for the whole process!


0

Are you using Ubuntu as a Host (physical device) and Kali as a guest (Virtual Machine). Assuming "yes", you have to add your user to vboxusers group. To do that, open a terminal and run: sudo adduser USERNAME vboxusers Then you will need to close your session or reboot the computer and try again. For more information, take a look to this article: Set up ...


1

Bad hardware or outdated hardware EEPROM's firmware is the answer. I had noticed that printing over USB cable stopped working in October 2015. It was not a screaming issue since I had configured my network so network printing was possible from any network device. It turns out my Prolific Technology, Inc. PL2305 Parallel to USB port bridging cable I used ...


0

The way I personally approach this would be for loop with find command, supplying the directories where drives are mounted for DRIVE in "/media/username/Drive1" "/media/username/Drive2" "/mnt"; do find "$DRIVE" -type f -name "myFile.txt" done Simpler way would be just supply the directories without for loop find "/media/username/Drive1" ...



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