Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

of=/dev/rdiskN bs=1m I didnt realize my first time that the N is still a variable for the disk number you found when running diskutil list


0

You're probably not going to be able to figure out which drive it is without some fiddling around. More on that later. Firstly, try to mount the device. If the mount fails, nothing is plugged in. Change the paths and options, obviously. (must be run as root, or with sudo) mount -t cifs -o <options here> //192.168.0.1/share_name /mnt/whatever if ...


1

"Removable drives" probably refers to something like SATA drives that can be hot-plugged, like on a server, maybe eSATA as well. "Removable media" probably means more along the lines of USB devices. There is probably a difference between mounting a USB device and mounting a SATA device. USB drives are generally mounted automatically (optionally in this ...


1

It sounds like your drive is damaged: [ 372.444424] end_request: I/O error, dev sdb, sector 250589039 Here are some things to try: Attach the drive to a Windows machine and run a checkdisk there. NTFS checks are probably better under Windows (this is an assumption). Run ntfsck. On Debian systems, /sbin/fsck.ntfs is a symlink to /bin/ntfsfix but this ...


0

Flash drives sadly do not last forever, they can easily fail and become unusable or even unmountable... Try your flash-drive in a different USB port, then in another computer entirely to make sure it is the flash-drive that's the problem..


1

Or am I missing something all together? In general when I disconnect a flash drive it prompts to ask to empty trash. Those files of yours are probably 'moved' to the recyle bin (to a directory named .Trash). A method to not use the Trash is to delete with shift + delete (and it is also an easy way to check if this is the case).


0

On Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS it is as easy as: $ sudo mount /dev/sr0 /media/cdrom To unmount, type: $ sudo umount /media/cdrom


0

Maybe it is an ExFat partition, so you will need to install support for it. Just do sudo apt-get install exfat-fuse exfat-utils and reinsert your flash drive. Another possibility is that your stick is NTFS formated and it was not removed safely. Just insert it into a win computer, do a scan disk ,remove it cleanly and try angain in Ubuntu. I hope it helps. ...


0

Not all types of partitions are automatically mounted by Ubuntu. But that doesn't mean the USB drive is not detected. Run the following command to see all mountpoints. mount This will show something like /dev/mapper/ubuntu-root on / type ext4 (rw,errors=remount-ro) proc on /proc type proc (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev) sysfs on /sys type sysfs ...


1

The 'flush' option is a middle-ground option. It will improve your chances over a default mount, however, there is still some caching. AFAIK, it is meant to provide a balance for flash drives. If you want to go even farther, use the options 'sync' and 'dirsync'. These have drawbacks, though. You may take a huge performance hit since flash drives have ...


0

I read everything, literally, everything about this particular issue (Install windows 7 from bootable USB on Ubuntu) well and here it starts: Gparted installed ok Unetbootin 494 wouldn't start (that's it, not starting (did EVERYTHING correctly, changed it's properties too)) Newer version does not recognize ntfs. So I tried another option, to open windows ...


0

The correct command is sudo dd if=/path/to/downloaded.img of=/dev/rdiskN bs=1m (Replacing N with the disk number you found by running diskutil list) The space between rdiskN and bs=1m is not clear in the guide because of the way the text wraps.


0

I too am having this problem. I am running Debian jessie 13.13 (I'll update this post with more concise info). My laptop is a Asus UX51vz with an integrated graphics card. I am not sure exactly when the problem began, but I believe it was after I upgraded my distro from wheezy (stable) to testing. OP, if you're still having this problem could you run a ...


0

You can download ubootnetin and turn a USB drive into a bootable install media. Then, go into your BIOS settings and set it to boot from USB, With the USB plugged in, boot the system and install. I do not know if you have used Linux before, but once you install Ubuntu, you will be using the Grub bootloader to boot into Windows. Keep that in mind and save ...


0

It is most likely a firmware or driver issue. If it is working over USB 2.0, then at least you can still copy files. To help diagnose the problem, have you tried the drive in Windows over USB 3.0? If it fails there, then it is most likely: The drive The USB 3.0 port The USB 3.0 controller


0

Most USB flash drives are formatted with FAT32. This is a simple filesystem with no journaling or other fancy features. Data is only written if metadata or file contents get modified unless you set the mount policy to read-only. For Linux distributions, you could do this by adding the ro option when manually mounting a partition with the mount program. You ...


1

Open a terminal (Ctrl + Alt + T) and type the following command: df . -h Output can look like: Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /cow 14G 74M 13G 1% / And in case you like to change the size of the persistent file you can take a look at: http://ubuntu-usb-large-persistent-storage.blogspot.nl/ Have Fun ...


1

I tried the same operation on my system and there's no consequences as /dev/sdb will be recreated if you unplug/plug again your device. You won't be able to eject your device cleanly though as the block device has been deleted. So if there's no I/O operations in progress just unplug it and replug. Otherwise wait till a possible copy operation has finished.


1

Install Unetbootin from the repositories sudo apt-get install unetbootin On windows you can download from below link: http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/ Start it, select an ISO file or a distribution to download, select a target drive (USB drive or Hard Disk), select persistence if you wish, then reboot once done. If your USB drive doesn't show up, ...


0

The answer is yes, of course. You can finish it in this way: assuming you have two usb keys, one of them should be used as the bootable installation source, that means you can write the Ubuntu iso (let's say ubuntu14.04, "trusty-desktop-amd64.iso", you can find it from the ftp of ubuntu) to the usb drive by using for example a software named “ultraiso" or ...


0

Installing Ubuntu in a pen drive is a bad choice. However, you can always install Ubuntu on an external hard disk if you don't want Ubuntu in the internal hard disk. Installing Ubuntu on external hard disk is much simple! Just plug in the hard disk. Run Ubuntu setup and choose the external disk while installing. Follow instructions during installation and ...



Top 50 recent answers are included