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Try re-copying what you have on the pen drive. Hopefully that will work. Now your question how can I tell if it's done? Assuming you have ubuntu go to the GNOME-System_Monitor and go to the Procceses tab, and when your copying the files the nautilis file manager might be on the top. When it goes down back then the files have probably been copied. Another way ...


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I had the same problem today; "all of a sudden" my 14.04 wanted my password for "everything"; including (un)mount of USB sticks. I figured that I installed openssh-server in the morning. After removing it, everything is back to normal; I can insert a USB stick; and it is mounted without asking for a password. Strange. Just tried to repro; installed ...


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If writing with dd to the disk fails then it's quite possible your USB is bricked and will not function right again. USB drives do wear out - whether it be an external USB hard drive with spinning platters or a standard flash drive. Input/Output error indicates a problem with data write/read which can indicate broken hardware.


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I found the solution. I formatted my USB drive on a Windows laptop and connected it to my Ubuntu laptop. It showed fine.


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If you can get a copy of Hyrens Boot you might be able to repair it using the partition wizard. Not sure where you can find a copy of it unfortunately. I got a bootable copy from a buddy of mine who mounted it on a USB. Note: To use Hyrens Boot you have to boot it from BIOS


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Install gparted by: sudo apt-get install gparted Unmount the drive and try to create a new partition table, then format. In the event this does not work, You should run: dd count=1 bs=512 if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdx && sync #where x is your drive's id on the drive to zero the first 512bytes on the device(previous partition table) Then use gparted ...


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If all you want to do is bring the flash drive back to a usable state try using GParted and just make a new partition table then make a new partition on the drive in FAT, NTFS, EXT4, etc. Just keep in mind that all the data on the drive will be cleared in doing this.


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Check out this Arch Wiki's article After you install Arch Linux and you are done with the USB drive, you should zero out its first 512 bytes (meaning the boot code from the MBR and the non-standard partition table) if you want to restore it to full capacity: # dd count=1 bs=512 if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdx && sync Then create a new ...


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I found the answer to my question. All you have to do is go into the media directory as a superuser and delete the directories. Thank you for trying to answer my question.


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it might be a limitation of the MTP implementation in Ubuntu 14.04. i was having the same problem in 14.04, and i changed the setting on my Android device to PTP instead. now i can open files directly from the device. it appears that all of the same files/directories are available in PTP mode, so hopefully this solves your issue.


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You have already opened some application which is holding the mount for lock so you are not able to mount it. The application might be gparted,ubuntu-installer or others.


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The steps here: At the third screen (don't wait until the next screen), hit Alt+F1, Enter Type: df -h to get information where is USB flash disk located/ mounted. in eg.: "/dev/sda1" mount as "/media" Type command mount -t iso9660 /media/ubuntu.iso /cdrom -o ro,loop Then hit alt+F1 to back at main screen of installation Finish. Now you can continue your ...


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This is how i got it work. When it gets the CD-ROM error, move the install USB stick from one port, to another USB port on your PC. Then retry. This worked. I don't know why. Not only that but I was reinstalling 14.04 later that night, and the CD-ROM error did not happen again. The 2nd install went without a hitch.


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This happened to me once and I was very confused because fdisk -l seeing a too small device doesn't make any sense. I opened the USB stick and saw that units in there were physically disconnected from each other, put only in part. I disconnected them entirely and then reconnected them to make the USB stick work again. If you do this and it solves your ...


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You may use PROGRAM to check if your program is running to activate that UDEV rule, otherwise it is disabled because pgrep returns unsuccessfully. PROGRAM Execute a program to determine whether there is a match; the key is true if the program returns successfully. The device properties are made available to the executed program in the environment. ...


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Three things you need to make sure that they exist, to be able to watch movies from your USB drive on your TV: The USB drive needs to be in the correct format. eg Fat32 or ExFAT, check your TV’s manual for the supported format. If the disc is in FAT32 format, then files can't be larger than 4GB each. The movies need to be in a format recognized by your TV. ...


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First make sure that your usb device is recognized as sdb1, this could be done my the command dmesg you will receive the following output near end (over here my usb is recognized as sdb1) [67846.595889] sdb: sdb1 [67846.600396] sd 7:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI removable disk I would prefer you to make your own directory to mount your usb. so type the ...


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Try downloading the disk utility and then see if your drive is showing up sudo apt-get install gnome-disk-utility if the drive shows up you should be able to mount it without problem


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Before unplugging safely remove the device: udisksctl unmount --block-device /dev/<device_id> You can get the device_id by any of the fol: sudo parted -l sudo fdisk -l df



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