New answers tagged

2

Here is the easy answer: Open gparted select the right device in the menu Devices go to Device → Create Partition Table Choose msdos If that fails, throw away the USB stick: it's broken now format If that fails, throw away the USB stick: it's broken


0

What's on the HD that you're trying to use? If it's not a NTFS or EXT2/3/4 partition, you won't see it in the File Manager (Nautilus). In the terminal, type "lsusb" and see if the disk at least shows up there. Please give more details. Cheers, Al


0

Just use the installer of the live version to install Ubuntu onto your external drive. You can boot to it in the same way you booted from the USB drive, by selecting the boot device before starting windows.


0

Use your optical disc drive to create an Ubuntu install disc. Then insert the USB drive and boot from DVD. Now install Ubuntu to USB drive. To be absolutely sure windows won't get harmed, you can temporarily unplug the HDD if the hardware permits it. (Some laptops won't..)


0

Make sure all the parts are properly connected and retry in another usb 3.0 slot. When you say the hdd is not running, do you mean it doesn't show up in the file manager?


1

First, you have to check whether the flash drive is recognized or not. We do that by using the lsblk command, on terminal. Example: ritesh ~> lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 111.8G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 512M 0 part /boot/efi ├─sda2 8:2 0 107.4G 0 part / └─sda3 8:3 0 3.9G 0 part [SWAP] sdc 8:...


0

If you're trying to remove the partition from within Windows, it is very possible and simple to do. Open Disk Management, you can find it by right click on start on Windows 8/10, or from control panel in 7. From here you will see a graphical display of all disks connected to the system. Find the external drive, it's usually disk 1, since computers start ...


2

I know 2 reasons to begin with. 1st one is the most likely one. Kernel not loaded the usb storage module. lsmod will show if it is. If not ... sudo modprobe usb_storage to add it. Also can happen when the power supply of the USB is faulty. To investigate more you could do a ... strace -o log fdisk -l and post the results on pastebin (it might ...


0

Possible answer: I'm not sure how to do this for all USB drives universally, but if you have specific drives, you can edit /etc/fstab to set up their mounts how you like them. You can use Disks (gnome-disks), or if you don't mind getting your hands dirty, you can edit it manually. You'll want to set a <mount point> and I think you'll want these ...


0

When device shows up with lsusb command but is not assigned to a device (/dev/*), then try a USB port directly connected to the motherboard, usually at the back of your desktop.


1

I can't really be sure which of the things I did fixed it, but it turns out that something must not have been synced. Simply rebooting the computer fixed the issue. However I did try plugging it into a different Ubuntu system and it didn't work there either. So it was definitely something I did that fixed it. For anyone else facing this issue, I would ...


0

Aside from the fact that 15.04 is unsupported at this point, it has a minimum disk space requirement of 5 GB (Source). If you need to work under such tight space requirements you should consider to either install Ubuntu on a larger medium, install a flavour of Ubuntu with a smaller storage footprint (see for example How do I find out which version and ...


0

Using the System Menu > Preferences > Personal > File Management Here you have multiple option to select.



Top 50 recent answers are included