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I landed how to check this. I followed these instructions and my downloaded image seems to pass, but the tool won't work with it. I believe the Startup Disk Creator has a problem, so I am going to use another see if it works. Here are the commands: gpg --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv-keys "8439 38DF 228D 22F7 B374 2BC0 D94A A3F0 EFE2 1092" ...


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Although it pretty much never happens that the installation fails, the only way I could think of is making a recovery partition. I did a quick search for you and found this.


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The hardware was corrupted by some reasons which I could not understand. If you try all things written up and can not get any result, can be sure the usb drive will not be used anymore.


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From the terminal issue the command sudo apt-get install usbmount Source: http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/24731/automounting-usb-sticks-on-debian


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It isn't recomend but you can resize current partition and create, make bootable another one using GParted. This flash drive may not work correctly on some systems.


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Permissions are controls placed on every file and directory on a filesystem. They fall into two categories: ownership - who has the power (user and group) access - what powers do they have (generally read, write, and execute) To change these we use the commands chown (to change ownership) and chmod (to change access), or you can right-click the file and ...


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The easiest and most fail safe way will be to save your files in password protected archive files, 'zip' being the most popular archive file format supporting such protection. This format is supported directly in most OS's including Ubuntu and Windows, without installing any other applications. If you want complete drive encryption you'll have to install a ...


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Generally when there is an issue, you can see an error on the /var/log/syslog. Otherwise, try to erase by using the right & simple way fdisk: fdisk /dev/sdb When you entered, press p to print the partitions , n to create a new partition, t to change the file format of your new partition when it prompt you to tap it. When you finished press w to write ...


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After waiting so long for an answer, I decided to install UBUNTU to my 16GB pendrive, however the setup was unable to install grub bootloader so I installed it myself following the guide : http://howtoubuntu.org/how-to-repair-restore-reinstall-grub-2-with-a-ubuntu-live-cd Then I used dd to create a disk image. And restored the image to external HDD ...


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Try the Disks utility - that should be on your menu somewhere (in my case under Accessories). You can also launch it from a terminal by running gnome-disks ... then select the disk and you will see a power button at top-right of the window, with tooltip "Power off the drive".


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Unfortunately, no; last access time is the only thing that can help you and it's not recorded by default on FAT filesystems (if you try with stat, you'll find a semi-fake number, based on last mount I think): θ64° [romano:/media/romano/PEN8G] % stat present.pdf File: ‘present.pdf’ Size: 291235 Blocks: 576 IO Block: 4096 regular file ...


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Thanks for replying. I stopped using my printer several months ago and when I tried to get it going again it wouldn't work I have figured it out it was a in my system settings some how something got unchecked.It was a more simple fix then I thought thanks again for the replies


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You can make a bootable USB without downloading any software. On a linux PC - Right click on the iso file and select open with and then click on disk image writer. Now select your usb drive and click on start restoring. Wait for 2-3 minutes. Your USB is bootable now and you can boot now. Click here for image-1 Click here for image-2


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You just want to mount a drive you've plugged in? You can use the graphical file browser and just click the entry for it, or you can use the command-line. If you use the command line, find out the path to the device and then mount it with udisksctl. To find the path, I suggest checking the output from dmesg after you've plugged it in. For example, I ...


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I've done this with external HDDs using Ubuntu 14.04 and 12.04, I'm assuming that is what you're attempting. I start with Gparted to identify the device, usually its /dev/sdb1 or similar. Then I find the device, there is a drop down in the top right (at the moment) to change between devices. Once you have located your USB device select it. I like to use ...


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As has been said earlier, software can't control what power is sent out to what USB ports, however depending on the spec, to which the port was build, will depend on what the electroncis will kick out of it. It sounds like you need to get back to basics to work out what power you have/need. I've had similar problems with USB and Raspberry pi. The ...


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You might try the tlp package for Thinkpad power management, it provides some USB options: http://linrunner.de/en/tlp/docs/tlp-configuration.html#usb Read the install instructions carefully, it is incompatible with laptop-mode-tools (uninstall first). # tlp stat| grep -i USB shows the info about USB device manamement then.


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After different trials I was able to find out the problem, it seems that the downloaded ISO file was not complete although Chrome Download Manager has mentioned that the download was complete, I downloaded a fresh copy, checked it with the MD5 Checksum and it seems to be working now, at least I can see now the Ubuntu initial installation menu I am facing ...


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Simplest one is here you only need to go to the media folder and change permissions. Follow below to commands. cd /media/ sudo chmod -R a+rX * And it's done.


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Thanks for your responses. Found out from my IT guy that you need to download and install Bit Torrent (http://www.bittorrent.com/) to download and convert the ubuntu-12.04.5-desktop-amd64.iso.torrent on the Ubuntu web site to extract the ubuntu-12.04.5-desktop-amd64.iso image you need to use in order to install it on a PC. Sadly you can't just rename the ...



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