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1

Test this: In a normal session: Insert the usb stick. Open a terminal. CtrlAltT. Identify the usb-stick, suppose is /dev/sdc1, umount it: sudo -i fdisk -l umount /dev/sdc1 Load gparted gparted Delete a patition, create an ext4 partition, apply the changes and close gparted You must mount the new /boot partition, suppose is new ext4 /dev/sdc1 on a ...


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IMO smartctl is a better tool. You likely have to install it first sudo apt-get install smartmontools Then sudo smartctl -a /dev/sda | less to print drive health data, attributes, and available test results. To quit less, type q. Alternatively sudo smartctl -H /dev/sda to just print health data. To begin a new short (a few minutes) or long (up ...


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Throughout this answer I'll assume that a storage drive appears as a block device at the path /dev/sdc. To find the path of a storage drive in our current setup use Gnome Disks (formerly Gnome Disk Utility, a. k. a. palimpsest), if a GUI is available, or on the terminal look at the output of lsblk and ls -l /dev/disk/by-id and try to find the right device ...


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Well nvm, I learned why my flash drive didn't work. I tried a different one, and it worked. Now I know why the SanDisk Cruzer 16GB was so cheap. I'll just use it to install my drivers.


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Check this post on AskUbuntu! Here is a page on the official Ubuntu website with BitTorrent There is an option in the install process which lets you choose the partition you want to use to install Ubuntu on. Normally it's the last.


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With Ubuntu 12.04 I could not connect to my vanilla Android 4.1.1 tablet as a USB storage device, to copy files between my computer and the tablet. I followed the advice here without success. Running lsusb in the computer's terminal showed that the tablet was connected as a device (and the USB cable was probably OK), but gMPT reported 'unable to open raw ...


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According to the dmesg excerpt, the disappearance of the device in the lsusb listing, and the driver issues Windows reports, your USB drive is terminally broken. A good data recovery tech may be able to salvage the data on it, since often only the USB interface chip is broken, not the flash memory or its controller.


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The actual equivalent to Nautilus Mount/Unmount operation is gvfs-mount -m -d /dev/ice /some/directory and gvfs-mount -u /some/directory. This uses the same API that Nautilus uses, GIO virtual file system (gvfs), which provides different tools to use several services as mount points, such smb, NFS, FTP, block devices, etc. To identify which device you need ...


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The udisks command is most likely what you are looking for. While sudo unmount /dev/sdXY will work, udisks can do this without root level (sudo) permissions. If you have a drive /dev/sdXY, mounted, where X is a letter representing your usb disk and Y is the partition number (usually 1), you can use the following commands to safely remove the drive: udisks ...


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Once you know the device, possibly using the df info as in @rcpao answer, the best way to "eject" the disk is, imho, using the same command that the graphical interface is using: udisksctl unmount --block-device /dev/sdc1 I have a script to do a backup to a disk that I know will mount under /media/romano/movlin, and after the backup I do: sync ...


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df to find the mount point of your flash drive. rcpao@bun:~$ df Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-root 1916153032 658404668 1160390336 37% / none 4 0 4 0% /sys/fs/cgroup udev 16438692 4 16438688 1% ...


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Ok the -p option seems to work. This installation is not confirmed to be working yet because it is in progress for me. Follow the instructions bellow if you want to try it out. Format your usb flash drive to ext2 Create the folder "chroots" in your usb flash drive Run the following command : sudo sh -e ~/Downloads/crouton -r trusty -t gnome -p ...


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It's always good to have a boot media around so you can repair any problems on the internal installation -- like a power failure causing disk corruption. Also, you might want to show a friend how Ubuntu works on their computer. There's no real need to keep it because you can always recreate it from Windows if needed.


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First make sure this is really a permission issue. If its really then locate where your USB is mounted. Then do a ls -al to check for the ownership and file permission. If you see that the permission for any file is not right then you can change it according to your need. For example i am giving the read permission for others to the file named "test". ...


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Pamusb is much easier solution. links to setup guides: pamusb setup guide on github. debian wiki guide on pamusb.


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Manually Mount a USB Drive A USB storage device plugged into the system usually mounts automatically, but if for some reasons it doesn't automount, it's possible to manually mount it with these steps. Press Ctrl+Alt+T to run Terminal. Enter sudo mkdir /media/usb to create a mount point called usb. Enter sudo fdisk -l to look for the USB drive already ...



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