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Linux kernel implements the strategy that all read-writes from/to external devices go though the RAM (buffer). So sometimes it can be seen graphically that at first the contents are going very fast from disk to the external USB but its slowing down at the last moment, this happens when the contents are being transferred from buffer to the USB device. This ...


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F3 (Fight Flash Fraud) is another option which should additionally detect fake flash drives (flash drives whose actual capacity is a fraction of advertised capacity): Insert your drive Install F3 sudo apt-get install f3 Write test data to the free space on the drive f3write /media/$USER/D871-DD7C/ Read the test data f3read /media/$USER/D871-DD7C/ ...


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I did this recently with a SSD in a USB 3.0 housing and it worked very well on a USB 3.0 port of a Lenovo S1 Yoga. I tested it with a USB 3.0 64GB key and it was not that smooth. Running it from USB 2.0 is too slow to work with. I also tested it with Win 8.1 and Office - no problem like an internal HDD. One thing: I could not install an anti virus scanner ...


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No, it is not secure. To securely install unetbootin, run the following commands: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install unetbootin Alternatively, you can use the cat command like so to copy the .iso file to the usb device: sudo -s cat <file> > <device> exit or you can use the dd command: sudo dd if=<file> of=<device> ...


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If you're trying to create bootable install media for Debian, from a Debian installation, UNetBootIn is fine. I don't know what you mean by "secure" or "do a copy." Also, this is an Ubuntu Q&A site. Debian, while similar, is not Ubuntu.


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Ubuntu has neat command udisksctl which allows looking up information with the info option on a block device specified with the -b flag. Now, if we scan the output of udiskctl for each block device from a to z, and search for the 'usb' string in it, we can be sure it is a USB device. Bellow is a script that does exactly that: #!/bin/bash FOUND=0 for var ...


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Using find and awk #!/bin/bash # your code ... # The name of your MAXimum 1 drive in /media/$USER maximum1="MAXimum 1" if [ -z "$(find /media/$USER/ -maxdepth 1 ! -path /media/$USER/ -type d |\ awk '! /'"$maximum1"'/')" ] then echo "Hey, the only USB device is $maximum1" else echo "Hey, no USB pendrive in my I/O." fi # your code ... ...


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Most of the pendrives are using NAND MLC. SLC pendrives are rare and usually more expensive. Some examples: Zalman U3M16 16GB SLC Flash Drive Mach Xtreme MX-ES Ultra SLC USB 3.0 Flash Drive Lexar JumpDrive Triton 32GB USB 3.0 Flash Drive IronKey S200 1GB USB flash drive I am sure with a little googling you will find more. Interestingly most of the ...


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If you can't move it due to operational reasons (in other words, you can move, but things won't work anymore), then here's what you a gotta do: In Terminal: cd /home mkdir usb sudo mount /dev/sd_ sudo mv /home/Completed/* usb/ sudo rm -r /home/Completed sudo umount /dev/sd_ sudo mv usb Completed sudo mount /dev/sd_ Completed And the USB drive will hold ...


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There are two methods. If you have wine preinstalled: Download Rufus (you need Wine two run it. then select your iso file and the usb device. the rest is easy Wine not required: Install Winusb. Open a terminal windows (Ctrl+Alt+T) Paste the following commands one by one: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:colingille/freshlight sudo sh -c "sed -i ...


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Hey have found that Yumi is a very good tool for this. Although you can not install server edition of Ubuntu from it. You can do the desktop and windows plus it is easy to learn. Here is the link http://www.pendrivelinux.com/yumi-multiboot-usb-creator/


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It looks like your 4GB USB stick is broken. To ensure no one uses a destructive test and just copy-pastes the stuff without reading the explanation, you have to type the next command all in lower-case. WARNING Never use the -w option on a device containing an existing file system. This option erases data! If you want to do write-mode testing ...


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Open a terminal, sudo -i to become root. Run fdisk or parted, delete all partitions, create a new one. Use the fat32 option for type. Run mksfs -t fat32 /dev/sdb (assuming you haven't moved your USB). Done. If that doesn't work, consider providing details as suggested above. Sometimes cat /dev/zero >/dev/sdb will remove corrupted stuff from USB.


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I disagree with the comments that you need to perform this operation on a Live CD. You're talking about an external USB drive, not a system drive. You definitely can do this operation from your installed system. If gparted is reporting this error, you might have something wrong with the ntfs partition. You should probably run sudo ntfsresize --info ...


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Try connecting it, then umount it then try to partition it with a "sudo mkfs.vfat -F32 -I /dev/sdX"


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There are two speeds to take into account: one is the bus' speed and the other one is the drive's speed; the lowest of the two is a bottleneck and sets the maximum overall speed you're going to get. USB 3.0 on his own caps at 4.8 Gbps (600 MB/s), but reasonably only SSDs might reach that cap; commercial (even not cheap) USB flash drives are usually way ...


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The USB flash drive shows in GParted (as some other users suggested I check in the comments). To fix the issue, I loaded the drive using the selector on the upper-right (of GParted), right-clicked the partition (which was FAT32), selected "Format to", "FAT32" and then followed the prompts, which appears to have fixed the issue (it now appears in Nautilus ...


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In ubuntu there is many method by which you can format your pendrive 1 - by Disk utility see the video // simplest way 2- by Gparted tool see the video you can install it from Ubuntu software center or you can install is by typing sudo apt-get install gparted 3- by using Terminal see the video go to super mode by typing "su" followed by super mode ...



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