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I had the same problem, I solved this problem using noapic nolapic acpi=off boot parameters and using the BIOS legacy.


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In the worst case, the flash drive has either a defect or has died. I bought three identical Patriot 32GB Supersonic drives from an online retailer and one of them was "write protected" out of the box. I went to the manufacturer's website and, after downloading and trying their own tool just to be sure, they granted an RMA without any fuss about it. I had ...


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You should either change the device boot order in your BIOS settings or, if you do not want to make any permanent changes, find your system's boot menu button and press it the same way you press the BIOS setup button while your system starts up and select your USB device from there. The most common boot menu buttons are F8 and F12. You should consult your ...


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Try accessing your BIOS, then look for you boot drives. Identify your USB drive and move it up to the first place of you boot sequence. If you already that, consider reinstalling Ubuntu using another tool. I recommend using Rufus


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You need to check that your pc looks for an Operating System in the USB before the Hard Disk Drive. You need to change the BIOS options for that. Google your pc model for entering the BIOS and changing boot sequence.


0

Try sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/<device>. That will completely overwrite the drive with zeros. Then you can format it to FAT 32 or whatever using the Disks utility.


1

From what i understand you don't want software like MultiBootUSB, YUMI or MultiSystem. You already installed WindowsToGo, all you need to do is create linux partition after Windows partition and install Lubuntu to it just like you would install it to any other hard-disk. Your USB drive will be probably listed as sdb, sdc, etc. Make sure you don't mistake it ...


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Physical disks are named by sd(a,b,c,...) sd = Sata disk a = first disk b = second disk etc... I hope you understood up to here now you should know which one is your harddisk after that you should mount your Disk if it is not mounted automatically if it is mounted you can find it's mount point by type "df -h" in output search for mountpoint column of your ...


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It depends, but you can easily find out... From GUI ...by right-clicking on any of the files or folders inside the drive, and choose > Properties ("Eigenschappen" in Dutch), in nautilus: As you can see, the directory is /media/jacob/My Passport Note that in commands, you need to fix the (possible) space: /media/jacob/'My Passport' From cli run: ...


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To figure out where your flash drive is mounted, you can use the command lsblk. Example output: theone@jakku:~$ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 232.9G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 39.2M 0 part ├─sda2 8:2 0 753M 0 part ├─sda3 8:3 0 139G 0 part /media/theone/EE4601124600DD69 ├─sda4 8:4 0 1K 0 ...


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You should be able to mount USB drives using any file manager by simply clicking on it or in command-line with the mount command: for that you would need to know where it is in /dev/ - easy way to find out: disconnect USB drive, type ls /dev/, connect it again, type the same command and see what changed, Let's suppose it was sdb and sdb1: Type mkdir ...


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Your Cylinder/Head/Sector (CHS) seems incorrect. I had similar problem with my friends 16 GB USB. But when I did "Analyse" in TestDisk there was a warning in the output about the mismatch. Try this: Run TestDisk sudo testdisk -> select the correct drive -> select the Partition Table Type -> now select Geomety to change the CHS values. Than in the next menu ...


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I had similar problem and ended here. I was migrating my system to another hard drive and have the same user with encrypted home on both old and new system. I tried ecryptfs-recover-private /media/old_disk/home/my_name/.Private but that directory was in fact symbolic link to /home/.ecryptfs/my_name/.Private/ The target directory existed, but ...


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You can also automatically mount USB devices on Ubuntu Server with the help of USBmount. Make sure you run apt-get update/upgrade before starting the installation: sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade Now install USBmount from the repositories: sudo apt-get install usbmount USBmount mounts all USB drives in /media/usb* (usb0, usb1, usb2 ...


2

Gparted doesn't support creation of exfat file systems. You can use mkfs.exfat utility from the terminal like: sudo mkfs.exfat -n LABEL /dev/sdXn Replace LABEL with the label that you want for your USB and /dev/sdXn with the partition id of your USB. You will have to install exfat-utils and exfat-fuse from the universe repository for the above to work; ...


0

Same problem. I accidently interrupted the formating of the pendrive.But you can try to attach to the other computer or OS, just make sure the pendrive is faulty.


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Auto-mounting from terminal with sudo mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdb1 /media/Elements mounts as root. Since ntfs does not have explicit permission management on a file-system basis, there's no point in using chown, chmod or chgrp. To mount it so it is user accessible from terminal, you need to use the user mount option, like this: sudo mount -t ntfs-3g -o user ...


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Ok, I got it. All of the above did not work but I noticed that /media/username was also out of bounds, which was really weird as as was logged in as username. I guess it all has to do with changing the UID a while back. Anyhow, deleting /media/username let it be recreated automatically upon the next plug-in with the right permissions.


0

Try this: Unplugg the usb Open a terminal:Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: exec sudo -i mkdir /media/Elements chown -R -v sarah:sarah /media/Elements chmod -Rf 777 /media/Elements


0

Not sure if it will work because I can't test it myself but here is what I would try. First make sure that the USB is not plugged in and mounted. Check /media/Elements and see if it exists. If it does I would delete it then insert the USB again and see whats in the /media/ folder. If Elements isn't in there and some other folder is .. then the Label on ...


2

you need to add user option to your fstab (/etc/fstab) like this /dev/sdc1 /media/sdc1 vfat uid=1000,noauto,user 0 0 /dev/sdd1 /media/sdd1 vfat uid=1000,noauto,user 0 0 /dev/sdb1 /media/sdb1 vfat uid=1000,noauto,user 0 0 Normally, only the superuser can mount filesystems. However, when fstab ...


1

Your device /dev/sdc1 is a Read-only, unmount the disk on Gparted and format. Gparted-Example


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The error points to it not being mounted .. maybe its not mounted at that point. Try running gparted and switch to the usb then look at Mount Point and check where and if its mounted Or you can type in terminal: mount | grep ^'/dev/sdb1' it should return /dev/sdb1 on /media/michal/MUZA type ..... if it is mounted .. or a different path if it is ...



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