Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I would use encfs which is available for linux, osx and windows. Advantage is that you can also use it with cloud storage since encfs encrypts on filesystem level and therefore the changes only affect the files changed not a partition as a whole. Edit, additional info: On Linux it's as easy as encfs ~/Dropbox/encrypted ~/Private I presume it's similar ...


0

There is DoxBox: Open-Source disk encryption for Windows Easy to use, with a 'wizard' for creating new 'DoxBoxes'. Full transparent encryption, DoxBoxes appear as removable disks in Windows Explorer. Explorer mode lets you access DoxBoxes when you don't have admin permissions. Compatible with Linux encryption, Cryptoloop "losetup", ...


1

64GB is very large, most ISO's are under 2GB, so using a "write the ISO to the entire USB" method (like dd) would waste 62GB of space. I'd use the multiboot USB method to boot a live ISO (Ubuntu, Mint, etc...) from it, especially if your computer has 4GB or more of RAM. You could use persistence to save changes, or just save files to a folder or other ...


0

In terminal, type: sudo fdisk -l The command output will show different devices; among them, you will find the one you want do mount. For instance, if it is /dev/sdb1, of type ntfs, you will want to type: sudo mount -t ntfs /dev/sdb1 /media/your-username/ext-drive-folder/ Where the folder /media/your-username/ext-drive-folder/ is a folder you create ...


1

It sounds like you may have a broken pendrive; go to a terminal and try these commands; ensure the pendrive is in fact /dev/sdc 1st though (use mount): sudo -i fdisk /dev/sdc p d p n b w This should give you a list of partitions; delete the only one there (if more, repeat 'd' until there aren't - whilst being careful that this is definitely the right ...


0

You would probably have to look at some performance comparisons on line. If speed is your goal, you might, even though it would be a little bigger, use an SD card reader and get a high speed SDHC card with UHS Speed Class 3 (U3). They're designed for video recording and fast throughput. I'm guessing your laptop doesn't have a memory card slot. I've been ...


0

I have installed it successfully on the microSD card on my phone and plug my phone into any PC and boot it from USB. It's no different to installing it on your laptop..... wasn't for me anyways.


0

I couldn't solve this problem my last resort was to backup all my files format and install a fresh copy of ubuntu


0

The Command-Line Way In case you can't get your device formatted from the GUI, try this way. Open the Terminal (Ctrl + Alt + T) List your block storage devices by issuing the command lsblk Then identify your pen drive by it's SIZE. In my case its /dev/sdb Erase everything in the pen drive (OPTIONAL): sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdb bs=4k && ...


0

Issue 1: As already mentioned in the comments, use the native version of Counter Strike. (It should be in your Steam games library already!) Issue 2: You've probable got MLC pen drives that are really slow, so Ubuntu copies the data to the cache and then doesn't freeze, but keeps writing from the cache to the pen drive until it's finished. If you want fast ...


1

The first step I suggest is to blacklist the driver for the internal card so that the driver suites don't interfere. From a terminal: sudo -i echo "blacklist ath5k" >> /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf modprobe -r ath5k exit It may take a reboot. If this is ineffective, I will edit this answer with further steps.


0

The most hassle-free way to find out which device-name a certain disk/drive/unit has: Mount the disk via the GUI (e.g. Nautilus) Open a shell and type lsblk, press ENTER The "MOUNTPOINT" column will have the label of the disk as in /media/$USER/label - assuming it has a label. If there is no label, then unmount the disk and re-run lsblk - compare the ...


3

Solution There is (normally) no device called /dev/discY. You will have to find your device using ls /dev|grep sd this will return you someting like $ ls /dev|grep sd sda sda1 sda2 sdb sdb1 sdc sdc1 then you mount the partition, of wich you think it could be your usb-stick and see if it is the right device. mount /dev/sdc1 /mnt && ls /mnt ...


1

You need to find the right location of your usb drive before you run dd. In my experience usually usb storage devices are located at /dev/sd*. Check the output of lsblk to know where your usb drive is located. Then use that location in dd. of=/dev/sd*



Top 50 recent answers are included