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When device shows up with lsusb command but is not assigned to a device (/dev/*), then try a USB port directly connected to the motherboard, usually at the back of your desktop.


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I can't really be sure which of the things I did fixed it, but it turns out that something must not have been synced. Simply rebooting the computer fixed the issue. However I did try plugging it into a different Ubuntu system and it didn't work there either. So it was definitely something I did that fixed it. For anyone else facing this issue, I would ...


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Aside from the fact that 15.04 is unsupported at this point, it has a minimum disk space requirement of 5 GB (Source). If you need to work under such tight space requirements you should consider to either install Ubuntu on a larger medium, install a flavour of Ubuntu with a smaller storage footprint (see for example How do I find out which version and ...


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Using the System Menu > Preferences > Personal > File Management Here you have multiple option to select.


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You can use Unetbootin and press F12 when the brand of your laptop appears on the screen when it boots. choose the usb storage device option.


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Off the shelf format on SanDisk is Fat32 (vfat) which is case insensitive. There are a couple of nice GUIs to repartition your drive, I prefer 'gnome-disks' if available for lubuntu, or gparted as mentioned above.


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Your thumb drive probably has a case insensitive file system. You would need to format it using a case sensitive filesystem do be able to do what you want. Yes, you can format it to have two partitions, use gparted to create a partition table and 2 (or more) partitions on your thumb drive, set the first one as vfat (that´s the one you will be able to use on ...


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Unless overridden by mount options GID= or UID= the owner and permissions of the mount point upon mounting become those of the filesystem tree being mounted. So if /dev/sdb1 contains an ext4 filesystem (say a backup) owned by user then user will become the owner of the mount point upon successful mount. Starting off we have an empty folder 'backup' to ...


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The Ubuntu install process (not grub-installer itself, which will write to a target) writes to the sda's EFI partition regardless of what you tell it. There have been several bugs filed on this, with other potentially worse issues like having the machine's native boot entry changed. See bugs 1173457, 1229488, ... and many more if you search. Add yourself ...


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Once you have burn Ubuntu Server 16.04 to a USB, go to your computer's boot menu at boot by pressing esc or f10, depending on the manufacturer, and then select "USB device".


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You can use the gnome-disks tool to create a live usb of any distribution and it works for me every time (startup-disk-creator does not), though it is a bit unclear it can do that. If it is not preinstalled in lubuntu run sudo apt-get install gnome-disks Now open it and choose your USB drive on the left, now click the small cog icon in the volumes ...


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ok! It turns out that .iso file that I had copied to the USB via dd cmd, is actually stored in a special file-system/format: iso9660, that's read-only according to the "experts." The easiest solution is to make a small partition on the USB just for the iso marked "bootable" with cfdisk, and then a separate partition(s) for the remaining portion of the USB ...


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Here's how: 1. On the live Lubuntu disk open a partition manager (usually called "disks" or "Gparted"). Now you must format your USB Drive to the MBR/DOS format. Delete any partitions that may remain on the drive. You can do a quick format. Create a FAT partition on the drive. The size of it should be at least 500 megabytes. Now do a format (once again, ...


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probably it's "disk" not "disc". unmount with " diskutil unmountDisk disk1 (or whatever disks shows u the cmd "diskutil list") and then " sudo dd if="the iso file name" of=/dev/disk1 (same as above)



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