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1

You can use one of the following commands to get information details about mounted devices: all different commands are used to getting different information in different manners, results ... dmesg sudo fdisk OR sudo fdisk -l sudo blkid lsblk mount lsusb usb-devices df -h


0

Ok, so Here's what I did :- 1) Booted into a windows system , formatted the usb as fat32. The problem was still as it is although on windows I was able to read/write from the usb. So, I rebooted my system and the usb stick worked as before. I don't know why this happened.


0

Flash devices don't last forever. When they fail, they sometimes exhibit symptoms similar to what you're reporting. Although it's worth trying other suggestions here, there's a high probability that your device is simply dead and that you must replace it.


0

Run gparted, choose your flash drive, then go to Device -> Create Partition Table and then choose one from thes list, msdos is just fine, then you should be able to create new partition(s).


0

It sounds like a permissions problem. A few things I've found can cause this quirky problem: Saving the data from one account/system, and try to add from another? Using a protected name for the folder (such as Documents). That almost always messes with permissions, and locks a user out of the folder or drive. I've found that Gparted is a good tool for ...


3

First of all, USB 3.0 is a communication/plug/cable standard and no file system, so you can't "format" anything to USB 3.0 or USB 2.0! Furthermore, the data transfer rate always depends on the slowest device in the connection. So no matter if you use a 3.0 device on a 2.0 port or a 2.0 device on a 3.0 port or even both 3.0 device and port, but with a 2.0 ...


1

Download Jahshaka here and put the file in a folder of your choice, e.g. ~/MyApps Then follow these steps: cd ~/MyApps mv Jahshaka\ 2.0 jahshaka_2-0 chmod +x jahshaka_2-0 It may be that you still need the following libraries: sudo apt-get install libfuse2:i386 sudo apt-get install libxmu6:i386 sudo apt-get install libxft2:i386 The start Jahshaka with: ...


0

Jahshaka support for Ubuntu appears to be very, very shaky. Your best chances are to download the portable version here, make it executable (chmod) and hope for the best.


1

this fixed my problem sudo modprobe -r floppy source: http://www.webupd8.org/2010/05/fix-usb-devices-automount-not-working.html


1

With the installation CD ubuntu-14.04.2-server-amd64.iso I ran into the same issue, for me it was as easy as running: umount /dev/sdc1 My tail -n 20 /var/log/syslog showed that the installer tried multiple times to mount /dev/sdc1 but since it was already mounted to /media that obviously failed. With the above command I unmounted the USB-CD-Drive and the ...


1

Return The USB thumb drive to the store and ask for a swap if it's still under warranty (check the manufacturer's web site) as it looks like it's dead now... Sorry to be the harbinger of bad news...


-1

I had the same problem with one of my memory sticks. I installed pmount sudo apt-get install pmount and then mounted it with pmount /dev/stb1 and I was then able to use the stick.


2

Notice that if you use some kind of extension for USB ports like an express card to get USB 3.0 on your laptop or something like this it can be the your computer is unable to boot from these ports. Use the ones built into your computer. Most modern computers will allow you to boot from USB. You can find this option in your BIOS or UEFI settings. Look out ...


0

I saw this behavior once on a machine whose disk enumeration was not consistent. The generated grub.cfg had the wrong disk numbers, and wouldn't work until the USB was removed, and reinserted, forcing a new disk number, which then worked. Take a look at your grub.cfg and try just editing the hd numbers. When the USB worked, it was given sde, so try hd4. ...


0

Open GParted, select you USB stick as device and choose "Device" → "Create Partition Table ..." to create a new Partition Table. By default, the right type for you is selected, just confirm. Then right-click on the empty storage space is shows you to create a new partition.


1

This test does not read the version from the device but tests for actual capabilities. If you don't have USB3.0 port, this test will give you false results so make sure to use USB 3.0 (or higher) port. Open terminal and start by running this command: lsusb You should get a list of all USB devices in your system that looks something like this: ...


2

If the inside of the USB is blue blue then the USB is 3.0 if not then is you can tell in the disk or drive manager in ubuntu.


1

Make sure that you have a USB flash Drive plugged in. Open terminal. Just press Ctrl+Alt+T on your keyboard to open Terminal. When it opens, run the command(s) below: lsusb That will list USB information. Look for the USB flash drive info as shown in the image below: Then do lsusb -D /dev/bus/usb/003/023 To get more info about the USB flash ...


0

You should use the official isos from Ubuntu, which you can write to USB.


-1

The final solution was actually easy: There was a hardware problem with my USB and I bought a new one and now it works fine.


0

I ran into the same problem when I switched my system to use freeipa. I played around with the groups, but nothing worked. I eventually discovered that I had a user directory in /media left over which had the wrong user id. Runninggetfacl /media/USERNAME returned this: getfacl: Removing leading '/' from absolute path names # file: media/USER # owner: root ...


0

@NikTh Thank you your solution helped me out greatly, I spent some time stuck on an error and thought encase anyone else had the same error I would share how I (as a new user to Ubuntu) solved it. I followed NikTh's steps exactly but got a "file not found" style error. I did two things after a few hours of struggling that helped. In the boot directory I ...


0

First be sure of the drive that you want to install Ubuntu on, ie. A: drive, B: drive, C: drive, which ever one that is your flash drive that you want for installation. During the installation process, choose the custom installation option. At that point, you can install Ubuntu on the USB flash drive. The reason for doing it this way is that you will have ...


0

dd duplicates everything including the blkid. "What might have gone wrong?" is a drive with the same blkid might already be mounted when you insert the flash drive and the system wouldn't automount what it sees as the same drive twice. If changing the blkid doesn't solve this problem, drop me a comment and I'll dig deeper.


0

You can also run sudo chmod 0777 /home/storage Since FAT drives don't have permissions, linux applies the permission of the mount point to the entire drive.


0

As mentioned in my comment. Using renice and ionice seems to have fixed my problem.


0

You can try this: Create a new file like quirks.conf in /etc/modprobe.d/ with the following content: options usb-storage quirks=<VID>:<PID>:u The format is quirks=<VID>:<PID>:u Where <VID> is the VendorId And <PID> is the ProductId of your quirky usb device, which may be found via lsusb. The 'u' flag disables uas ...


0

Fedora live USB works with UNetbootin from the Ubuntu Software Center. Fedora is on UNetbootin's list of compatible distros. You should reformat the USB flash drive as FAT32 in GParted first if you have ever used the USB flash drive to boot a Linux distro.



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