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Under Windows, do a chkdsk /f x: where x: is the drive letter of the Windows USB disk. Furthermore, disable hibernation on Windows and always correctly shut it down completely. This is also a bit off-topic here as it's a purely Windows solution, so in the future remember that this site is all about Ubuntu and the people here are very good at dual-booting ...


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The correct, best solution would be changing the label of the disk. I too had problem with some disk and needed to do that in Windows (grrrr). Two solutions: learn to quote the filenames correctly: ls "/media/mark/Seagate Expansion Drive/" (notice the ") will work. See also http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/bash-quoting or ...


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try disabling secure boot from boot option menu and choose the boot method from Legacy boot menu as usb drive from there. there may be some option other than F2 in boot screen to enter Legacy boot option menu.


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Not sure why it wouldn't work with the tools you mention. Could be that the USB is faulty. If you don't care about the data and you just want to make it useable again, you could wipe the partition table and start from scratch. sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/USB_DRIVE bs=512 count=4096 conv=fsync What this does it to flash all zeroes to the beginning of ...


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Running hdparm -y /dev/sdb as root will cause the disk to stop spinning. If anything access the disk, it will spin up again. The man page suggest this is only useful for IDE drives. However I have tested that it does work with a USB drive attached to a Dell running 14.04. The man page says the command will usually cause the drive to spin down, which ...


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I have three equally valid solutions from which you can take your pick. My personal solution is to buy a use hub featuring a power switch for each port. I find it amazingly handy. If I recall, it cost only about $6 on amazon. I'll see if I can find you the item for sale before I post this, but it is enough to tell you such an affordable device exists. ...


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If your desktop does something fishy, you cal always fallback on the terminal. sudo umount /dev/sdXY # (this will umount, it will complain on opened files, if so lsof and see which ones.) sudo sync # ( this flushes all buffers to disk. It will ensure that no data is lingering in ram.) sudo eject /dev/sdX # ( this works on dvd/cds and some, not all usb ...


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Unplug the USB cable should do it. If not, then plug it back in and safely remove it again until it stays off.


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If you want, you can even fix that in windows, run cmd as administrator then type diskpart list disk select disk 1 (make sure its the right one) clean (if it complains about permission, just type clean again) then just make new volume in disk management, right click on computer -> manage ->disk management


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This is easy to fix. Merely open GParted, you may need to install it if it is not installed. Then right click on the 2 Mb FAT partition and select Resize/Move. You can expand that partition into the 15 Gb of Free Space.


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You have to remove partition 1 and system Partition 2 ; Then you can create a new 16GB partition and format it as you like Don't you see that there is a 16GB free space unformatted at the end


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The 4GB USB drive is too small for a full install of Ubuntu 14.04 The installer should have refused to install Ubuntu in a 3.5 GB partition. A full install requires about 5GB / partition. So you will need at least an 8 GB USB drive. I recommend a 16 or 32 GB drive if you intend to install many programs and store large personal files. One thing to remember ...


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What is happening is very simple: Ubuntu is using the cache (basically your RAM) to copy and while the file is being copied to the cache, it starts emptying the cache to the USB. When it arrives at the end, only the cache needs emptying, so it is just waiting for the USB stick to catch up. This is a "feature" of the kind of USB stick you buy: MLC USB ...


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Here's a solution: others may check this out -> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS6VhLDw-io


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If even dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdd is giving you an I/O error, your USB stick is broken: throw it away and buy a new one. Sorry to be the harbinger of bad news. :-(


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It is possible and the best option is to use a live CD like Clonezilla Live. You could also boot with any Live CD and use dd to clone the disk: dd if=[disk_with_ubuntu] of=[pendrive] bs=512 conv=noerror,sync Where [disk_with_ubuntu] is the disk containing your Ubuntu installation (f.e. /dev/sda) and [pendrive] is your pendrive. You have to be very sure ...


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None of the given answers worked for me on my 14.10 system. I used gparted as described in https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RenameUSBDrive. sudo apt-get install gparted open gparted choose the thumdrive from the dropdown in the top-right corner umount the volume (right-click on drive) right click and choose "label"


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If your USB drive has problems on both Windows and Ubuntu and it's connecting/disconnecting/connecting/disconnecting/... all the time, it looks like your USB stick's control circuit has been busted. To be absolutely sure, try another USB peripheral on the same port (Keyboard/mouse printer/...) and if that works flawlessly, throw away the USB key and buy a ...


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I posted my fix in another question before I saw this one: sudo apt-get install --reinstall gnome-session Please be cautious this might break some other packages. In which case try to reinstall the package.



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