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To create a Grub2 menuentry you must add it to the /etc/grub.d/40_custom file. Add the menuentry below the existing lines in the file. Open the /etc/grub.d/40_custom file as root with a text editor. sudo nano /etc/grub.d/40_custom Add the menuentry. Save the file. Update the Grub 2 menu. sudo update-grub SystemRescuecd example: menuentry ...


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I think it's because your USB drive has a file system that does not store executable bit permissions, and is being mounted so that all files show up as executable. A mount option like showexec for fat filesystems is supposed to do this: If set, the execute permission bits of the file will be allowed only if the extension part of the name is ...


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There is a color scheme in terminal, you might find the below link useful to understand the meaning of those colors Terminal color schemes


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What you see is an artifact. There really is only one 1.9GB partition. /tmp for example is a tmpfs, ie it is in memory, yet it shows up. A command to use if you have it is findmnt which shows you the hierarchy and where the real disks are. When you download a large file the Avail column should change. You should be able to use the /media/... disk, but you ...


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Ubuntu uses /media as default place for automount, so you can just use a hack for your problem. sudo ln -s /media /path-to-your-dir Now whatever the usb is mounted then it will be listed in some dir inside your dir stated above. This is some hack, maybe you can find better answer.


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Warning, the following involves formating the drive. Formatting will often erase files and saved contents so BACKUP the files BEFORE YOU START as this process may very well and probably will delete everything on the device!!! You can encrypt the device using the following commands: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install cryptsetup gnome-disk-utility ...


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This is actually a Windows Guest issue, not one with Ubuntu, so this should be migrated elsewhere, in my opinion. Use USB 2.0 instead of USB 3.0 emulation. Only Win8+ has USB 3.0 native drivers as part of Windows, so only USB 2.0 emulation will work with Win7 and older guest OSes. I know this because setting up the VM I use for forensics in Windows ran ...


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As long as you have a USB drive of 4GB or more, you should definitely be able to install Ubuntu on your machine.


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Did you unmount the USB drive before removing it? In Unix systems it's important to unmount removables otherwise the changes will not be written to it successfully.


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This is probably a permission issue. Either you mounted it in read only or you have got the file in some wrong permission. Did you try viewing hidden files on the other computer? I would suggest transfering your files too a windows to see if the files arent your probleme.


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On Windows Refer to the official Ubuntu documentation here - http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/create-a-usb-stick-on-windows. You can find the instructions and ideal usb siz there. If you are on a Linux Machine You can use unetbootin.


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Just use startup disk creator(linux) unetbootin(windows) to do it. Set persistence mode on to be able to save files to it without the usb deleting your files.


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Your command udisksctl unmount --object-path /media/user/Flash-Drive is wrong. /media/user/Flash-Drive isn't an object path. Find the object path with this command: $ gdbus introspect --system --dest org.freedesktop.UDisks --object-path /org/freedesktop/UDisks/devices --recurse --only-properties | grep -E "(readonly .+ ...


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My suggestion is to use the umount command. With the fdisk -l command and inserting different usb-drives determined as identified, say they are /dev/sdd1 Before creating the actions (file.desktop), create its directory: mkdir -p ~/.local/share/file-manager/actions Create and edit the action file (umount.desktop) by using these terminal commands one at a ...


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Use the command unmount, like this: Suppose your usb drive is mounted to /media/usb then it would be sufficient to use this command: sudo umount /media/usb You may also have a look at the answers at Umount all attached usb disks with a single command Source, Unix & Linux


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You specify the filesystem type with the -t option. As described in man mount: -t, --types fstype The argument following the -t is used to indicate the filesystem type. The filesystem types which are currently supported depend on the running kernel. See /proc/filesystems and /lib/mod‐ ules/$(uname ...


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Launch the app gnome-disk-utility, find your usb on the sidebar, and click the triangle play button under the filesystem graph and it should mount it. Like this:


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First, open a terminal and execute the following command: nautilus /media/$USER/ & Nautilus should open and on the left, the USB device should be listed as "15.0 GB Volume". Click on "15.0 GB Volume" to open the device. If the device does not show up in nautilus, you can manually mount the drive. Open a terminal and execute the following ...


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If you are simply using pendrivelinux to create an Ubuntu LiveUSB it will not make any changes to the laptops hard drive. You can still use Ubuntu by booting from the USB drive if you make it using pendrivelinux. You will also have an option to choose how much space to use for persistance



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