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7

The udisks command is most likely what you are looking for. While sudo unmount /dev/sdXY will work, udisks can do this without root level (sudo) permissions. If you have a drive /dev/sdXY, mounted, where X is a letter representing your usb disk and Y is the partition number (usually 1), you can use the following commands to safely remove the drive: udisks ...


7

The actual equivalent to Nautilus Mount/Unmount operation is gvfs-mount -m -d /dev/ice /some/directory and gvfs-mount -u /some/directory. This uses the same API that Nautilus uses, GIO virtual file system (gvfs), which provides different tools to use several services as mount points, such smb, NFS, FTP, block devices, etc. To identify which device you need ...


7

df to find the mount point of your flash drive. rcpao@bun:~$ df Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-root 1916153032 658404668 1160390336 37% / none 4 0 4 0% /sys/fs/cgroup udev 16438692 4 16438688 1% ...


6

Once you know the device, possibly using the df info as in @rcpao answer, the best way to "eject" the disk is, imho, using the same command that the graphical interface is using: udisksctl unmount --block-device /dev/sdc1 I have a script to do a backup to a disk that I know will mount under /media/romano/movlin, and after the backup I do: sync ...


2

It's always good to have a boot media around so you can repair any problems on the internal installation -- like a power failure causing disk corruption. Also, you might want to show a friend how Ubuntu works on their computer. There's no real need to keep it because you can always recreate it from Windows if needed.


2

Throughout this answer I'll assume that a storage drive appears as a block device at the path /dev/sdc. To find the path of a storage drive in our current setup use Gnome Disks (formerly Gnome Disk Utility, a. k. a. palimpsest), if a GUI is available, or on the terminal look at the output of lsblk and ls -l /dev/disk/by-id and try to find the right device ...


1

IMO smartctl is a better tool. You likely have to install it first sudo apt-get install smartmontools Then sudo smartctl -a /dev/sda | less to print drive health data, attributes, and available test results. To quit less, type q. Alternatively sudo smartctl -H /dev/sda to just print health data. To begin a new short (a few minutes) or long (up ...


1

Test this: In a normal session: Insert the usb stick. Open a terminal. CtrlAltT. Identify the usb-stick, suppose is /dev/sdc1, umount it: sudo -i fdisk -l umount /dev/sdc1 Load gparted gparted Delete a patition, create an ext4 partition, apply the changes and close gparted You must mount the new /boot partition, suppose is new ext4 /dev/sdc1 on a ...



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