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Solution There is (normally) no device called /dev/discY. You will have to find your device using ls /dev|grep sd this will return you someting like $ ls /dev|grep sd sda sda1 sda2 sdb sdb1 sdc sdc1 then you mount the partition, of wich you think it could be your usb-stick and see if it is the right device. mount /dev/sdc1 /mnt && ls /mnt ...


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dstat is better that iostat for monitoring strictly disk activity. I am running the following command while moving files from one harddrive to another dstat -D sda,sdc for more info, have a look at this page https://help.ubuntu.com/community/DiskPerformance


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You need to find the right location of your usb drive before you run dd. In my experience usually usb storage devices are located at /dev/sd*. Check the output of lsblk to know where your usb drive is located. Then use that location in dd. of=/dev/sd*


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The first step I suggest is to blacklist the driver for the internal card so that the driver suites don't interfere. From a terminal: sudo -i echo "blacklist ath5k" >> /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf modprobe -r ath5k exit It may take a reboot. If this is ineffective, I will edit this answer with further steps.


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It sounds like you may have a broken pendrive; go to a terminal and try these commands; ensure the pendrive is in fact /dev/sdc 1st though (use mount): sudo -i fdisk /dev/sdc p d p n b w This should give you a list of partitions; delete the only one there (if more, repeat 'd' until there aren't - whilst being careful that this is definitely the right ...


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64GB is very large, most ISO's are under 2GB, so using a "write the ISO to the entire USB" method (like dd) would waste 62GB of space. I'd use the multiboot USB method to boot a live ISO (Ubuntu, Mint, etc...) from it, especially if your computer has 4GB or more of RAM. You could use persistence to save changes, or just save files to a folder or other ...



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