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12

You should not worry about this too much. Maybe your USB pendrive is of "lower quality". The dialog output regarding the time is misleading. Other copy tools may have a different output behavior, but they do not improve the writing speed of the USB drive. Most important of all is that finally the copy action succeeds. What you can do is optimizing the ...


11

The current iso image is ddable and the images have been ddable for quite some time now as far as I know. sudo dd if=./ubuntu.iso of=/dev/sdx bs=16M Where ./ubuntu.iso is the path to the actual file and /dev/sdx is the target USB drive. Alternatively, you can use cat instead of dd which is arguably faster like so: sudo -i cat ./ubuntu.iso > /dev/sdx ...


6

The reason that you see the copying happening the way you do is that writes to the USB drive are asynchronous. When you copy a file it actually copies it in to the usb drive's buffer, which is in the RAM of your computer. The first part of the copy is very fast because it is just going in to the buffer. The data is flushed from the buffer to the USB drive ...


5

The problem is likely that the file is read and stored in memory completely before it's completely written to the target drive. This doesn't mean to answer the question exactly, but a workaround could be using pv from the command line in case of big files: sudo add-apt-repository universe && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install pv ...


4

First mount your flash drive with read/write/execute privileges. How to auto mount a flash drive with root and read/write/execute privileges Then create an empty folder on your flash drive. Open Steam settings, click on Steam and then click on Settings. Steam -> Settings -> Downloads Click on Steam Library Folders 3.Click on Add Library Folder ...


1

Yes this is completely normal as you are not the owner root is (root ran the application that you used to format the drive.) You can gain permissions again by opening a terminal and running sudo chmod 666 /dev/sdx (where sdx = the location of the drive.)


1

Just download the .iso of Ubuntu version you want and create a bootable USB. After that you go to your BIOS and select the option to boot from the USB device, then Ubuntu will load. Thereafter simply follow the tutorials you'll ever see, selecting the option to install or test without installing because you might want to see how the system and everything, ...


1

Try with this: sudo apt-get install ntfs-3g


1

Try clearing the whole drive(please triple check that the sdb is really the USB stick first): sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdb bs=1M Then use Gparted to create a new partition table, and add one primary partition of FAT32 type to it. Don't forget to apply the operations. Remove and re-insert the stick, and see if you can mount it and it's the expected ...


1

as far as I now, by default everything related to steam is installed in /home/USER/.steam. If your USB drive is mounted with execute permission, you can go to steam's settings menu -> downloads -> content libraries and add a new content library on your USB drive. But I don't see the benefit since the USB drives are slow...for simple arcade games ...


1

There are a number of alternatives. You could use the command line approach: cp *source* *target* where source is the file you want to copy and target is the file or folder you wish to copy to. Further options might be found at http://softwarerecs.stackexchange.com/


1

It turned out that I need to install a special driver for NTFS filesystem. After apt-get install ntfs-3g the mount /dev/sda /media/kingston-pendrive worked properly and I was able to write to the pendrive. More info here: https://linuxconfig.org/how-to-mount-partition-with-ntfs-file-system-and-read-write-access



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