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An easy way to check your script syntax is with the following command: init-checkconf -d /etc/init/service_name.conf I've found that even with a valid Upstart file if the file didn't exist when the server was booted last I have to reboot the server for Upstart to see the file.


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There are several ways you may wish to approach this one, I have tried to be complete as possible and hope that one of these solves your problem. Is it needed? If you don't need upstart at all, just uninstall it: sudo apt-get purge upstart that will cause it to be removed from automatically from the menu too In the case that you NEED upstart (probably ...


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Upstart is the init system in Ubuntu (till 14.10). It manages services and starts/stops them at appropriate times, and captures their output into logs stored at appropriate locations. Upstart is also able to run services for each user, and the logs of these user-specific services are stored in ~/.cache/upstart by default. Here is it's documentation As to ...


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You could consider making your application a startup service. Here is a good guide to get you started.


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sudo works both ways, root can also act as a regular user sudo -u userName -g groupName I haven't used it but it looks like gksudo has the same functionality for desktop top applications


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One way, which I find cumbersome, is given in the Upstart Cookbook (4.3.1.1: Joining a Session). You have to set UPSTART_SESSION: export XDG_RUNTIME_DIR=/run/user/$(id -u) export UPSTART_SESSION=$(initctl list-sessions | awk '{print $2; quit}') After that, it works fine: $ status tor9050 ...


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upstart executes commands as root by default. But the user can be specified: How do I start jobs as a non privileged user in Upstart?. But the script was programmed with user specific variables and a dependency to a specific directory. init.py had this line: self.d_root = os.path.join(os.path.expanduser('~'),'Documents','records') I changed it to this ...


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If you want to, you can instead make a systemd .service file that does the same thing. A basic systemd .service file for the above command might look like the following: [Unit] Description=Start VNC server Requires=lightdm.service After=lightdm.service [Service] ExecStart=/usr/bin/x11vnc -auth /var/run/lightdm/root/:0 -display :0 -rfbauth ...


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Okay turns out the [drm:intel_dp_start_link_train] *ERROR* too many voltage retries, give up from the kernel is a known bug but was a red herring and had nothing to do with my problems and from what I've seen people say it's not a problem. I think it has something to do with ASUS. I am using ASUS TaiChi 21. Also running systemctl enable for several login ...


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Yes on version 14; no on version 15. On Ubuntu Linux version 14: yes, upstart truly is handling all of this. You need to read the part of the Cookbook that discusses how it handles programs that come only with old System 5 rc scripts, and the manual page for upstart "runlevel" events. There's a whole mechanism for invoking the old System 5 rc program. ...



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