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This icon is dialog-error.svg. You can find the 64x64 file in the following folder: /usr/share/icons/Humanity/status/64/dialog-error.svg For a quick preview, open a terminal and type: eog /usr/share/icons/Humanity/status/64/dialog-error.svg


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You shouldn't be that worried if you have not installed the nvidia driver on the newer computer in the same way that you did on the first one. There are a few things you should be aware of. First: the nvidia drivers will use dkms if it is installed when you manually install the driver. Before installing the nvidia driver, run the following command: sudo ...


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I've done the update 12.04 to 14.04 on several installations, did not really have any issues yet. YMMV of course. But I'd recommend to try the update first, if it goes horribly wrong, nothing is stopping you from doing a re-install. There is an option in the installer, not exactly sure about the wording, but it says "install over my existing ubuntu ...


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So the question here is: What should I do? Should I take the risk of updating, or maybe is better to download 14.04 and make a re-installation? Whatever you want. Please do not forget that we expect you to make a backup. I tend to do a re-install myself because I install and delete a lot to test software and this is a good way for me to be sure I reset ...


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You need to run apt-get as root or sudo. Example: sudo apt-get update *password* Also run any other apt-get commands as root or sudo. Example: sudo apt-get upgrade If you are quick enough after the first command, you do not need to give your password again.


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As can be seen from the output of dpkg --print-foreign-architectures, you have a bunch of invalid architectures added, for some reason. Remove them: sudo dpkg --remove-architecture x8664 sudo dpkg --remove-architecture x8-64 sudo dpkg --remove-architecture x864 In future, do check what you're adding.


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Try: sudo sed -i -e 's/trusty/utopic/g' /etc/apt/sources.list sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade sudo reboot EDIT: What this does: it updates /etc/apt/sources.list to use the utopic packages stream rather than the trusty stream. This will upgrade the packages appropriately.


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If do-release-upgrade does not work, try this instead: sed -i -e 's/OLD_DISTRO_NAME/NEW_DISTRO_NAME/g' /etc/apt/sources.list apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade Remember to replace OLD_DISTRO_NAME and NEW_DISTRO_NAME with the actual codenames. After that, reboot. EDIT: Some seconds late... :&



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