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1

You should look at it the other way around: find your personal files and put those on the 2nd disk. Since it is a /mnt it will be external, if it is ntfs it is useless for Linux except for storing your personal files. The Linux system itself needs it to be ext. Don't move /home/ itself to an external partition. You can also link the directories in /home/ ...


1

Open software and updates, choose Download from Other Then click Select Best Server a series of tests will be performed to find the best mirror for your location. A server will be recommended. Choose it and try again.


0

Finally, I edited the /var/lib/dpkg/status file sudo gedit /var/lib/dpkg/status and looked up for livenavigator. I removed it from the file. Then I ran sudo apt-get clean and I rebooted the PC. At least, I retrieved all my apt functionalities. many thanks Rodolphe


1

I think the answer is in the first screenshot you sent: "A previous upgrade which didn't complete". Could you open a terminal and issue: $ sudo apt-get update $ sudo apt-get upgrade If it shows error (you may) run $ sudo apt-get -f install or $ sudo dpkg --configure -a depending on the type of problem that apt found (it will suggest you what to ...


0

There's no such package in teh debian repositories, check here. Run apt-cache policy livenavigator to find out from what repository you installed the software from. Once you know that, investigate further (or add the output to your question so we can take a look at it.) I don't know what livenavigator is or does and I can't find it on the internet. If you ...


2

so at least one file pocsettings.dtd is included in both package libwireshark-data and libwireshark-common. Try to remove that file name from: /var/lib/dpkg/info/libwireshark-common.list so it doesn't know about the conflict and will install the new version.


1

The do-release-upgrade command, the Update Manager, the Software Sources program and the Software Centre all share a few common libraries and configuration files. The particular aspect you are looking at (the next version of Ubuntu you wanted to be prompted for), is set in the file /etc/update-manager/release-upgrades. You can edit it, and set the value ...


0

This one is the best understandable explanation for me now e.g. when in Software & Updates --> Updates --> Notify me of a new Ubuntu version and set it to for long-term support versions then the output of do-release-upgrade -d will >= true, as do-release-upgrade -d stands for: Check if upgrading to the latest devel (*development) release is possible ...


-1

I have only part answer to this question as of now. Use commands sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get dist-upgrade These should update almost every component in your setup. Since there are bug reports and last one seems being fixed as well. I hope these 3 commands at some point will fix the issue of GUI crashing as well.


1

All the sources are commented out. Remove the "#" in front of the entries starting with "deb" in your sources.list.


0

You probably still have GDM installed. Run in terminal: sudo apt-get remove --purge gdm When something comes up, asking what display manager you want to use select lightdm.


0

So I fixed this and I feel really dumb for not knowing this. Okay, the problem was that at some point, I added the 1386 architecture instead of i386. So when I tried to update with apt-get, it couldn't download the 32-bit packages. Thanks.


3

As NGRhodes points out, there simply isn't a 14.04 version of this PPA. You say you get this for every PPA... If that's really the case, you're either picking a load of duff PPAs without checking they have a 14.04 version, there's something else going on. Anyway, for this one, you have a couple of options: You can continue as you are (in the hope that ...


1

That PPA is no longer available. You should consider using another PPA to provide whatever app you want to install. To remove this PPA, run the following two commands: sudo rm /etc/apt/sources.list.d/iaz-battery-status* sudo apt-get update


0

Please click the "check" box, which is next to the "update" box. Sometimes that detangles the updater.


-1

can not comment because of lack of reputation, but you can install Y PPA Manager & then you could remove the erroneous PPA & then try updating. Update @Eliah, as told To Install Y PPA: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/y-ppa-manager sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install y-ppa-manager as far as how to manage & other things goes: ...


-1

Upgrading to 13.04 or 13.10 is not required. You can directly upgrade to 14.04. do-release-upgrade You might have to add SUDO depending on your privilege.


1

Here you can find information about how to make a cronjob. Make one with the timing you want and this command: /usr/bin/update-manager This will open the graphic update manager which then searches for updates. If you like graphical applications, you can just install a graphical cronjob manager with this command: sudo apt-get install gnome-schedule Its ...


1

If you know the repo error just use sudo rm /etc/apt/sources.list.d/REPO-DIST.list If you want to check what you've added and then remove from there you always can check with: ls /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ Then with the command mentioned above.



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