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70

APT lets you simulate your commands using the option -s. You can try this yourself, issuing the command apt-get -s remove apt (no sudo needed). This yields the following output: Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done The following packages were automatically installed and are no longer required: ...


27

You can... sudo apt-get remove apt Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done The following packages will be REMOVED: apt apt-utils apturl nautilus-share python3-software-properties software-center software-properties-common software-properties-gtk ubuntu-desktop ubuntu-extras-keyring ubuntu-minimal ...


9

Once, back when I ran CoreUbuntu, I installed a buggy package from source which apt decided obsoleted apt. Next time I ran apt autoremove, I didn't actually look at the list of software to be removed and apt was in the list. Imagine my surprise next time I typed apt install <package-name> and got The program 'apt' is currently not installed. You can ...


5

Ubuntu comes with a lot of GNOME applications pre-installed for giving the users an overall good desktop experience. Many of them have a deep system integration ... so it's not recommended to remove them - a good example is nautilus. But there are features that are quite safe to remove ... such as the controversially discussed online search integration that ...


4

Before following CiberSheep instructions, you can delete Photoshop with the Wine Uninstaller. Run, in a terminal: wine uninstaller Find Photoshop and remove it. After doing what CiberSheep said, run sudo apt-get autoremove to remove dependencies.


4

You first need to define what considers "break my system". A system without a desktop is not broken as is. Besides that: the safest way is what you did and to take a look at this by "category" from Ubuntu Software Center and the "installed" group. Accessories Books & Magazines Developer Tools Education Fonts Games Graphics Internet Medicine Office ...


3

Try first with sudo apt-get autoremove. This will remove the unnecessary dependencies. Then in /usr/share/applications just delete the corresponding .desktop file for the uninstalled application. If you still see the icon on the launcher, just right click it and press unlock from launcher.


3

Technically, apt can't remove apt... because apt doesn't know how to remove, install or upgrade packages. The tasks of installing, removing, upgrading, configuring packages are left to dpkg. Although you can tell apt to remove the package called "apt", what it does is checks the reverse dependencies of the apt package, take note of those packages and orders ...


3

EDIT: Understanding now you mean you need to use the "source" command (.) in bash, I thought you meant you needed to recompile from source. Now that you have identified the package as CCP (which I don't know) please look at this wiki related to CCP, seems to be a known issue that you have to source it every time you want it. Put the source command in your ...


2

SOLVED: moved the command back one level... root@blackserver:/sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1a.0# echo -n 1 > remove dmesg output now... [65207.355668] ehci-pci 0000:00:1a.0: remove, state 4 [65207.355680] usb usb3: USB disconnect, device number 1 [65207.355682] usb 3-1: USB disconnect, device number 2 [65207.360110] ehci-pci 0000:00:1a.0: USB bus 3 ...


2

Maybe the Ubuntu installation media was not created properly. Open the Disks tool in Ubuntu and create the install media. Select Restore Disk Image from the menu on the top right. Choose the installation ISO file and the USB drive to write it to. Start restoring - when finished reboot and select the USB drive. In case you can't choose it ...


1

If the image you posted is from Grub, you do not need to remove anything to boot into a different kernel. Just select it in Grub at boot time.


1

Those items - in Nemo called actions - can reside in the follwing directories: /usr/share/nemo/actions/ /usr/local/share/nemo/actions/ ~/.local/share/nemo/actions/ Those files have a structure similar to desktop launchers; here is a well documented example. From this example: # Whether this action is active. For troubleshooting. # Optional - if this ...


1

I had the same problem uninstalling Deluge. I realized that I had the GTK version installed so merely deleting deluge didn't do the trick. I used sudo apt-get remove --purge deluge-gtk


1

First, you should not need to uninstall Java 8 to switch to Java 7, due to the alternatives system. Merely installing oracle-java7-installer will make Java 7 the preferred JVM/JDK. If you ever do need Java 8: $ sudo update-java-alternatives --set java-8-oracle Note that this changes /usr/bin/java, thus affecting everything on that system that relies on ...


1

Aside from @mchid's correct answer, the command you should've used was sudo apt-get remove wine\* Notice the backslash. It instructs the shell not to open the wildcard, and pass it to apt-get as is instead. What happened is that your shell interpreted the wine* and passed a whole lot of package names for apt-get to remove, instead of just the ones you ...


1

I see no danger at all in leaving old kernels in place - just having said that you take care for enough space under /boot, also for future needs. But I have a special reason for keeping always one old kernel, one that does not get patches any more: oft it happens to me, that the newest active kernel gets patched, and then this one fails to start an important ...


1

Because Popcorn Time isn't a package from the repositories, but was (presumably) installed from a Zip file, you should be able to locate the folder you unzipped into and delete its contents, then remove the folder and any desktop shortcuts.


1

If you installed Java using Webupd8 script, then to uninstall Java do the following: sudo apt-get remove --purge oracle-java8-installer If you installed Java from Ubuntu repositories, then you can remove it by typing: sudo apt-get remove --purge openjdk-*


1

To uninstall the existing Java , you can execute the following command: sudo apt-get remove openjdk-8-jre sudo apt-get remove openjdk-8-jre-lib To install the Java V8 again, sudo apt-get install openjdk-8-jdk


1

If you installed "stuff" via a package manager (apt-get, dpkg, synaptic), it's all logged in /var/log/apt/*. It's a simple matter of editing to generate the apt-get purge commands. If you installed "stuff" some other way (sudo make install, /usr/bin/cpan, ...) you have to uninstall it using the same method. To make your life easier in the future, ...



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