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34

DO NOT RUN sudo rm -rf / --no-preserve-root on systems with systemd When running the command on a UEFI computer (2012 or newer) you are deleting all the UEFI firmware variables which can cause your PC to be bricked and cannot be repaired without a motherboard replacement on some devices. Here is what happened to one Linux user : An Ubuntu command bricked ...


19

I guess you want to sell your computer. In that case it would be the best to securely wipe the entire disk to prevent that anybody can recover any of your personal files later. The best tool for this is DBAN (Darik's Boot And Nuke). Download the .iso image and burn it to a CD or flash drive. Then boot your computer from it and let it erase the whole hard ...


16

Yes, running sudo rm -rf / --no-preserve-root will destroy your installation and your motherboard if you have UEFI, leaving only an expensive paperweight , the bootloader (GRUB) and an empty partition. Note that this will not securely erase data ! Files deleted in this way can still be recovered using data recovery tools. To securely erase the contents ...


16

Actually, the filesystem is still mounted, and some writes are buffered meaning they are still in RAM waiting to be written to the disk. Let's say dd correctly overwrites everything, and just behind it the buffers are getting flushed and some potentially sensitive data is getting written back to the disk. So no, this is not a secure way of wiping a disk. ...


8

I sacrificed a VM using a slightly more advanced usage of dd borrowed and slightly modified from the Arch Wiki pages. First install a nice progress meter: sudo apt-get install pv And then run the 'enhanced' dd command sudo openssl enc -aes-256-ctr -pass pass:"$(dd if=/dev/urandom bs=128 count=1 2>/dev/null \ | base64)" -nosalt </dev/zero \ | pv -...


7

Boot into a livecd. take note of the device names of your old system install, and unmount the drives if automounted. I'd use lsblk to check, and umount to unmount. Run the shred command on each device. This basically overwrites each partition with zeros, much like dban does. You can then delete the partitions with a suitable tool. dd should work, but I ...


6

Short answer: it'll do roughly what you want and then nothing will work. Using dd you're operating at a level below the filesystem which means that any constraints which would apply there are no longer relevant (this doesn't mean that the kernel couldn't prevent you doing this - but it doesn't). Some content from the filesystem is already in memory, for ...


4

It will as it did in your VM wipe the disk and render your system unusable. However if you have a sort of 'panic deletion' in mind dd might not be fast enough for that and I'm not sure if there are faster commands or programs providing it in that case.


4

⚠️ WARNING! PLEASE READ BEFORE RUNNING ANY COMMANDS! ⚠️ This answer is only provided for research and to further knowledge of Ubuntu Linux. Running any commands in this answer may very well destroy your system entirely. Make sure you're in a VM or a backup. I am not responsible if you break your system. The command sh is provided by dash, by way of a ...


4

If you don't want to empty the directory first, you can use rm -r to recursively remove directories and their content. Please note also that this is already explained in the documentation. rmdir: The rmdir command will delete an empty directory. To delete a directory and all of its contents recursively, use rm -r instead. Since you are not an ...


3

If you want to remove an entire directory with everything in it, you can use rm -r like dadexix said and if you really want to make sure add the f for force rm -rf i Always do that and it Always works


3

If you're on a single drive system attempting to wipe the root drive you should boot from a live media as mentioned by @JourneymanGeek. My preferred method for wiping a drive uses dc3dd. If you don't have it you can install it from the universe repository on a terminal with sudo apt-get install dc3dd. You'll want to determine exactly what drive you are ...


2

Easy: Run a live CD/USB with GParted. Search for your hard drive in GParted (usually sda/sdb). Mark all Ubuntu partitions (I always have / and /home) for deletion. Include swap. Apply the changes. You will have a clean hard disk. Or... You can drill your hard disk.


2

As long as the USB/CD is bootable, and your BIOS is configured to try and boot from the USB/CD drive first, you should be able to boot into the Windows installer. Make sure to set the boot priority in the BIOS. Directions for USB Windows install. How to change your boot device & boot order


2

The correct package name is kazam (with a lowercase "k"). Therefore you have to run the command this way: sudo apt-get remove kazam


2

Thank you all. The problem is now solved. I've reinstalled Steam and followed the suggestion here: Steam not opening in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS If you just installed Steam then go to ~/.steam/steam/ubuntu12_32/steam-runtime/i386/usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/ and delete the link libstdc++.so.6. Then it should start without problem. Steam is working fine now without ...


1

You do not "uninstall" an operating system like it is a piece of normal software. You use a live dvd session or an installation media to delete the partitions the operating system is on (and then proceed to install a new operating system). Grub menu comes up and prevents dvd from booting. That means you are not booting from the dvd. Either you are ...


1

Yes, you can definitely do it: Download the .iso of the Linux distro you desire. Download the Universal USB installer. Use the universal USB installer to create a bootable media, preferably a pen drive Restart your PC and boot from the pendrive. You may need to go into the BIOS and change boot device preference. You will be guided through the installation ...


1

You can simply sudo apt-get remove ffmpeg just be aware that other software you use may depend on ffmpeg, so, read apt-get output carefully.


1

It should work, the running process is held in Ram and does not need the disk. I would use a live system running from cd or usb anyway. There is even dban, a specialized live linux for disk wiping. Overwriting your disk with zeros is save, but if you are paranoid enough or have legal rules you can overwrite with random data multiple times. Be carefull when ...


1

To uninstall the 'paper' theme remove the following packages: sudo apt-get remove paper-icon-theme paper-gtk-theme paper-cursor-theme If you have used the provided PPA you can safely remove the PPA with ppa-purge: sudo apt-get install ppa-purge sudo ppa-purge ppa:snwh/pulp References: Ask Ubuntu: How can PPAs be removed?


1

You can get back the Ubuntu desktop with sudo apt-get install ubuntu-desktop From thereon it should be easy to re-install all the other lost packages. If you're looking for a list of all the (accidentally) uninstalled packages, you can find them in /var/log/apt/history.log.


1

You could open a terminal using Ctrl+Alt+T and then using sudo apt-get purge steam. The other option is to try restarting the system and then deleting it from the Software Center again.



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