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I had a small problem that can be of help to you: HDMI, there is some problem with HDMI that if its not correctly configured after installation it will stay black all the time,my advice is to switch to VGA and see if the problem continues.


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You can use this method without using WinUSB. http://onetransistor.blogspot.com/2014/09/make-bootable-windows-usb-from-ubuntu.html WinUSB also uses the similar method but just automated. By following the method below you will do it manually. If some error will occur on any step it will be easy to detect and fix it.


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I am a relative newbie but have just rebuilt my old laptop with Ubuntu 14.04. If you have an internal DVD build a boot DVD on a friends machine. Boot from that and you will be able to check out your hardware is all ok or not! If no DVD then you may be able to build a bootable USB dongle but I have never tried. PS does your machine only have a solid state ...


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I have experienced the same thing. I am stuck, and don't know if I should reload everything over what is there. I did get an error message that my hard disk was limited and some things might not work as they should. Da!


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I finally got it working. I got my X205TA 4 days ago and finally had time to set it up. Here are the instructions to install 14.10: https://github.com/lopaka/instructions/blob/master/ubuntu-14.10-install-asus-x205ta.md Hope it helps.


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so the steps are as follows: 1- In Windows , run cmd.exe as an administrator 2 -mount the UEFI partition using : mountvol X: /S change X with a drive letter of your choice 2- now kill the explorer and re-execute it, using Taskkill /F /IM explorer.exe explorer.exe 3- the new mount new mount partition should appear in the "My computer" window go ...


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Simply renaming both bootx64.efi in the EFI/Boot folder and bootmgfw.efi in EFI/Microsoft/Boot so that the firmware could not find either of it's default options caused it to use grubx64.efi which is the refind bootloader on this machine.


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I had the same issue as the Nikki until today, when I fixed it accidentally by making a hardware configuration change. My hardware is different from the Nikki's. I am using the Intel graphics built into my Dell Optiplex 7010. Since I changed from legacy boot to UEFI, the grub menu had been displayed at a low resolution, while the frame buffer continued to ...


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Some systems shipping with Windows 8 have trouble booting Ubuntu the way it is currently implemented for UEFI machines. You could try booting the live USB again and follow my instructions from this Q&A: UEFI machine doesn't boot Ubuntu through NVRAM bootcatalog. How to fix? Regarding the customization, if you haven't successfully booted Ubuntu from ...


-1

First enter your bios and change the bootup sequence to something like this: 1. Harddisk 2. CD-rom 3. USB 4. etc.. Then during boot press F12 to enter the one-time Boot menue! Otherwise your USB-stick will be named SDA that should be your (Primary) harddisk. Try that.


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When I go into the Windows (flag + C) "change computer settings" "update / restore" "restore" "Advanced Start" "Restart" "Use a Device" "EFI USB Device" so it will come up after some time "System does't have any USB boot option. Please select other boot options" Sounds like there is an issue with the media you created. Could you please have a look at ...


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Enable Secure Boot mode Hit Enter on "Select an UEFI file as trusted for executing" Browse to EFI/BOOT on your USB stick and select the corresponding file (you might have too put a 32-bit EFI file on there if your BIOS doesn't support 64-bit UEFI) Reboot


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If You are using Linux for the first time, then I would strongly recommend to leave partitioning job for the installer. Ubuntu installer has ability to automatically partition the hard disk in an optimal scheme - just use this function and everything will be good.


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I just manually copied /boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu/grubx64.efi to /boot/efi/EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi and it worked perfectly with the Secure Boot off.


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above the 3.16 kernel touchscreen works for shutdown is necessary to implement the following: sudo gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf add this lines at the end of document blacklist dw_dmac blacklist dw_dmac_core


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The short answer You can create a bootx64.efi binary from within the Ubuntu live media with grub-mkimage and write a custom grub.cfg to chainload the loaders you wan't to boot and copy both files to the EFI System Partition (ESP) into the directory \EFI\BOOT\. If you don't know your way around in the terminal, the script available in the following section ...


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If you stuck at the grub command line. Just type exit You should get back to windows like normal.


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http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/releases/14.04/release/ you will find the ISO file you need to create a dvd and boot off of. Don't forget to hold down the "C" key during boot up. I have 14.04 LTS installed on my mac 2008 pro 2,1, working great!Runs like a champ!


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This isn't really an Ubuntu related question though. According to the manual on page 7 (actually 13 in the document): Shut down the computer. Press the Novo button and then select BIOS Setup. On this model it is a small button near the power connector:


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This is a new patch to Wubi introduced with Ubuntu 14.10 that spares users such as yourself who have computers with EFI firmware from installing Wubi only to find that it doesn't work. What used to happen is that the install would have appeared to succeed (in Windows), sometimes after downloading 1GB of data, only to find upon rebooting an error message ...


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I have one piece of advice. I followed the first answer process, but GRUB still was not showing up. I followed the Fast startup off and the bcedit command, but it doesn't work. I was ready to use Boot-Repair in a Linux live USB, booting from BIOS, and I noticed a feature in 'Boot Manager' options that still showed 'Fast Boot' enabled, even when Windows said ...


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See the forum staff recommendations for WUBI at http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2229766. You can use a virtual machine, install to removable media like a usb disk or flash stick, or repartition your hard disk to make room for Ubuntu. WUBI is not really an option any longer.


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Could try this similar issue. Please don't mark me down, I don't have enough "reputation" to add comments versus an answer? http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2237568


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Try one-time boot from your USB drive, there is an specific key to get to the one-time boot options (most of the times it's F12) select 'Install Alongside Windows' and restart. Your laptop should boot into Windows 7 normally, don't disconnect the USB. A new window will be shown to you to install Ubuntu.


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I had a similar situation and was able to get past the 'no boot device' using tips from refind and the Web. Basically it consisted of moving some refind EFI folders and files around. I'll try to post the link. But even getting Ubuntu to allow me to choose kernel, it continues to fail to mount /dev, /sys, & /proc so I'm stuck again. Strangely I am ...


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Had the same Problem with a Phoenix SecureCore Tiano bios. To remove it I selected the ubuntu entry and pressed DEL a small x appeared at it's left. After saving and rebooting it was gone.


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I discovered that there is a way to do it - after finding a clue here: http://korrekt.org/page/Note:How_to_install_%28K%29Ubuntu_14.04_on_Macbook_7,1#What.27s_the_problem_with_EFI_on_this_Macbook.3F: (K)ubuntu will not ask if you want EFI or BIOS mode during installation. It will just use the same mode that you have used to boot the installer. Once ...


-1

I was learning how to use scalpel. A customer dinged up her laptop so I was trying to retrieve some data. Scalpel threw a load of .pgp into the scalpel dir and filled the partition. The box kicked out this very same error. So before you look for solutions, look at causes. Apparently, it says no when its full. No room at the in/out. Gparted sda7 into ...


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Just Boot to live ubuntu using live usb or dvd, then Install boot repair. code sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && (boot-repair &) then open boot repair and click on recommended repair


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If you are using the EFI / UEFI boot instead of the boot loader (eg. GRUB) of the HD, please disregard this answer. I would burn the .iso to DVD, then follow the advice above concerning setting the BIOS the way you want it. I would install the Windows 8.1 first, having it delete all partitions and then create one partition from half the drive. Do all the ...


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That drove me crazy for THREE FULL DAYS of 18-20 hours apiece! The solution turned out to be uber simple ... abandon the UEFI concept entirely. That's right, bulldoze that garbage overboard because HP tailored their rendition of it to only respond to Windows. (From reading between the lines on the HP (poor) support site and trying to avoid getting sucked ...


2

Fedora and Windows install a file called \EFI\BOOT\BOOTx64.EFI (x64 is the architecture and can be something like ARM too) in the EFI System Partition (ESP) which allows to boot an application or operating system when the NVRAM entries (storage on the mainboard) to boot a certain OS are not available or missing. Ubuntu currently doesn't provide such a file, ...


1

Step 1: Boot up the CD/USB and go into live mode (try without installing), when the computer has boot up, go to the terminal and enter sudo parted -l get to partition table for the disk you want to install ubuntu on with the disk space of roughly 128GB and make note of it. (we will continue this process later on). Basic recommended install The most basic ...


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Secure boot will let the Microsoft signed shim.efi boot, which then runs the Canonical signed grubx64.efi. Now this Canonical signed grub can run either signed or unsigned (by Canonical) Linux kernels -- some features will not be available on the unsigned kernels at boot, but you probably won't notice. Last time I tried this was with the 12.10 kernels, so ...


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If you haven't modified anything in \EFI\Microsoft (as it looks to me), then deleting the ubuntu folder next to the Microsoft folder should be sufficient. (If you have modified the contents then you should overwrite the Microsoft directory with Windows' bcdboot, have a look at the related section for instructions.) Regarding the confusion about the EFI ...


0

this might be related to this bug on launchpad. If yes, you could fix it by booting with refind installing an older version of efibootmgr (or compile & install the latest). re-create the bios entries with sudo update-grub examine bios entries with efibootmgr -v. Assure, that there are no entries with the same key. Hope, that helps!


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I have done this a few years back and what I did was just a plain install on a USB device and also installed Grub on it. So when chosen from BIOS boot menu, the USB drive loads Grub in which you choose Ubuntu. Should be simple and straightforward. What also comes to mind too is chroot (using existing Ubuntu installation which you don't have). Here I am ...


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You can use Universal USB Installer to make a bootable Ubuntu USB drive and use the persistence option available there. This would allow you to set a persistent file of some size that you would decide and which would be a fixed size. You can then use that USB drive on any PC and boot as a normal Live CD but infact would be able to save files which wont get ...


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removing bios password can be performed by contacting support of fujitsu then just disable secure boot, set boot devices order and you should be good to go if you want to learn your win8 key for future purposes just install this program


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I would like to add that I may be a [rare?] case of this method working with which you have originally posted. I did all of the bullet points except for the first one and it worked like a charm and I struggled for a good day trying to get around this fast-boot crap. I had win 8 pre-loaded and needed to replace it. As Rod said, just find what works for you. ...


0

Warning! This does not give a direct answer to your question but it gives a work-around with some bonus content. Hope it helps. You can always install Ubuntu in VirtualBox, do your thing there and as a bonus also test your modified Ubuntu in a virtual environment before you even try it out on your real hardware. Booting from a virtual USB is not an issue ...


0

This is a link to hardware 'certified' to work with Ubuntu. Samsung isn't even on the desktop or server list of hardware. If you got 14.04 to work it was just random good luck. More specs on your laptop for other users. Samsung is a pretty big provider of PCs, smartphones and tablets, I'm not sure why they aren't certified. Perhaps they just didn't ask. ...


0

The boot menu offers a low graphics mode and even a text mode installer in case there's no working graphics driver included with the installation medium. It would be crucial to get your keyboard working so you can select the right mode. The issue is usually a BIOS setting for “legacy“ USB devices, which you can read about in the manual of your ...


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To expound on biozalp's answer, I submit this tutorial Dual boot Mint and Windows 8.1 This allowed me to install Mint with no problems.


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If you want to support EFI boot mode, you should use Rufus. First off, download Rufus. Plug in the the Ubuntu ISO and let it churn. Make sure you have it set to GPT partiton scheme for UEFI computers. When that is done, open up your favorite partition editor that is not on the USB drive. Shrink the partition containing Ubuntu to 1GB. That should be ...



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