New answers tagged

1

This is perfectly normal; it's happened to me on many UEFI computers. The boot*.efi entries and the Windows Boot UEFI Loader one should all boot Windows. MokManager.efi is for managing Secure Boot keys. You probably won't ever use it, but you probably want to keep it around just in case you end up needing it. The System setup entry actually boots into BIOS ...


1

I have two thoughts on this: Filesystem damage Some EFIs are highly sensitive to filesystem damage, which might make it look as if a new GRUB binary was improperly signed. This would then trigger the MokManager display you've shown. (It's not technically Shim that's showing that display, but MokManager.) In this case, you may be able to fix the problem by ...


0

Try running Boot Repair again, but this time make sure "Secure Boot" (under the "GRUB Options" tab) is checked.


0

In the end I had to select the option to complete erase the hard disk and install Ubuntu. That was the only way to make it boot. I had tried every single answer I found on Internet and changed the settings in the BIOS/UEFI, but nothing helped me. Of course I followed the suggestions from @rod-smith but unfortunately without success.


-1

In my case some UEFI params needed to be set in the BIOS. I followed these instructions: https://itsfoss.com/no-bootable-device-found-ubuntu/ Here is a short description of the steps. Step 1: Go to BIOS (with F2) Step 2: Turn ON Secure Boot (You might need to set BIOS password before doing this) Step 3: Select an UEFI file as trusted for executing: HDD0 ...


0

Ok this fixed everything : Grub rescue problem after deleting Ubuntu partition! I did burn the ubuntu iso into an usb and did everything on it.


0

News: I was able to run from the live-pendrive and install by using the nomodeset param. I learned how here: Trying to install Ubuntu 14.04, monitor says mode unsupported/out of range Bsically, pressing the "e" key in the grub menu and adding that string after the words "quiet splash".


0

What seems to have happened is that GRUB (Ubuntu's default bootloader) has nuked the default Windows bootloader. I haven't used Windows in quite some time, but the solution is most likely to repair the bootloader using your installation CD. There is some information on this blog post here - http://blog.d0zingcat.xyz/2015/09/28/Windows/How%20to%20repair%...


1

First, a clarification: Your title says you upgraded to 16.04. Does this mean that an earlier Ubuntu had been installed and was booting correctly? If so, what version? This is important mainly to establish a baseline -- if Ubuntu was installed and booting, then we know that your computer is capable of booting it correctly, which rules out certain possible ...


0

By lucky i solved by problem. I boot with the liveusb and call the Disks and manually deleted all partions of the SSD. Then i reboot with uefi enabled in the computer firmware. I entered the liveusb ubuntu desktop and from there i installed the ubuntu. I checked the two boxes saying install updates and software from others. This solved my problem (but it was ...


1

Selectively unplugging one disk or another is a trick that some people used in the BIOS era, but EFI's design makes this approach less useful. This is particularly true for some computers, which may erase boot manager entries when they're found to no longer point to valid boot loaders, which of course will be true when you unplug a disk to which they point. ...


0

Only your host OS, Windows 10, requires EFI. You need to disable EFI on the VM. Afterwards treat the virtual machine as if EFI didn't exist, and read How to install Ubuntu on VirtualBox?.


1

Another way to do it is to create your own key, insert the public part into the MOK database and sign the modules you compile with the private part. Look here for detailed info: Could not load 'vboxdrv' after upgrade to Ubuntu 16.04


0

Which Ubuntu release are we talking about? The Ubuntu 16.04 install media dropped persistence, but an older 14.04 release still has it. If you just made another partition with a FAT filesystem on the install media, labeled it "casper-rw", and edited the grub boot command to add the wrord "persistent" to the linux kernel line, it might work though (never ...


1

In your original answer, you wrote: When you install Windows, Windows assumes it is the only operating system (OS) on the machine, or at least it does not account for Linux. So it replaces GRUB with its own boot loader. This isn't true under EFI. Well, Windows is still pretty rude, and could be said to assume it's the only OS, but it does not replace ...


0

You're probably running into this bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/grub2/+bug/1091464 If so, two workarounds come to mind: You can disable Secure Boot, as described in more detail on this page of mine. This has the drawback that you'll lose the benefits of Secure Boot, which is designed to protect the computer against pre-boot malware. You ...


-1

You need to install a bootloader. When you install Ubuntu over Windows sometimes the bootloader gets fudged. /dev/sda1 *or whatever sda(1,2,3,) you are using.


0

Try this: Insert Ubuntu Live-Dvd/Usb. Ensure the bios boot order is set to read the media first and start the computer Select Ubuntu Live / Try mode. Click on purple Ubuntu search button - enter gnome-terminal and click on its icon In a terminal run: exec sudo -i mount /dev/sda4 /mnt mkdir /mnt/boot/efi mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot/efi for i in /dev /dev/...


0

Windows Boot Manager bootmgr, manages the boot process. UEFI-based systems contain a firmware boot manager, Bootmgfw.efi. The BCD settings for the device and path elements in Windows Boot Manager indicate the firmware boot manager. The path element specifies the location of the Windows Boot Manager application on that volume. For UEFI systems, path ...


0

This helped me install 16.04 on my msi CX61 2PC with Windows 10 installed: Installing Ubuntu on a Pre-Installed Windows with UEFI


1

The best way to dual boot windows and Ubuntu in UEFI mode is to First Install Windows so that While installing Ubuntu, grub can recognize windows. The other thing to keep in consideration is that the GPT partition is UEFI in bootable usb.(The easy way to make bootable usb is to use rufus).


0

I have a acer aspire E 15 - E5-573: After trying different times different bios configurations, ended installing ubunto studio 15.04, note version i386 not amd64, with ethernet connection and the bios set to - Legacy. Ubunto studio immediatly after disk load made the upgrade to version 16.04. Another important thing is to check the bios version, if it is 1....


3

First, Ubuntu's Shim binary includes a copy of the Canonical (Ubuntu) public key embedded within it, and this binary is signed by Microsoft, so it should be possible to boot without the Canonical key in your firmware. That said, you might run into the issue you describe if you're using another Shim binary -- say, if you're dual-booting with Fedora and are ...


0

If you've got sufficient free (unallocated/unpartitioned) space on the disk, you can use GParted, parted, gdisk, or other tools to create a new partition in that space. The partition must: Be big enough -- I recommend 550 MiB or a bit more, but significantly smaller than that can work. Use a FAT filesystem, preferably FAT32 (a really small partition would ...


0

So, I actually resolved the problem. For some reason, the first ubuntu boot option was the one that I was able to delete. This was the one located at "/EFI/ubuntu/grubx64.efi". Not sure why, since the cases don't line up, but at least it works now.


0

If you're copying an existing Ubuntu system, yes, then you must also copy the EFI partition. If you can do a fresh installation, you might also decide to do a legacy install which does not need an EFI partition. There's no way to convert an installed system from UEFI to Legacy or vice versa. At least I don't know any, it's definitely not trivial. To ...


5

Yes, Ubuntu needs that EFI partition. UEFI is a (relatively) new method of booting for operating systems, and is much more featured than legacy/BIOS boot. Look it up for some more details. If you don't copy it over, you aren't going to be able to boot, as it stores the bootloader files for OSes that support EFI. There may be Windows stuff left over, but ...


0

I guess you've managed to find a way round this in the 9 months you have been waiting for an answer but it looks similar to a dual boot problem I had with a uefi system. The boot process is looking for a bootloader in the MBR but the boot files loaded all look to be .efi and these need to operate in a GPT formatted disk. I think the problem might well have ...


1

I had the same problem on Ubuntu 16.04 Desktop x64 iso file (14.04 does not make any problems). File integrity is ok, but having the same issue. I have solved that issue by using my pen driver on a USB 3.0 port rahter than USB 2.0. Just thought it might help.


0

I solved by pressing 'e' in grub and writing "nomodeset" before "splash" and then I could boot with the live usb. I could install it although the boot partition was not correctly linked in the bios. I solved this last problem with Boot repair.


0

I worked around the same issues by chainloading GRUB2 from rEFInd: Remove grub-efi and install grub-pc and gdisk. Using gdisk, create a hybrid MBR ("recovery and transformation options" -> "make hybrid mbr"). When prompted to set the bootable flag of your Linux partition, select Y. Install GRUB2 into the hybrid MBR: grub-install --force /dev/sdX Now ...


1

I keep saying this all of the time. Ubuntu has a usability bug in its install program. It needs instructions on how to make uefi boot. Go to Bios setup and you need to load the trusted uefi file. The way I did it on my acer was to go to the security tab. Then you set a password. BE VERY CAREFUL and MINDFUL.. peck it with one finger twice to be sure. If ...


0

At start up access the BIOs setting menu by pressing F12 (may change to F2, F9 or maybe holding down de ESC key, deppends on your computer) and go to Boot option tab, you should see something about Boot order and a list of all installed OS, select Ubuntu and move it up and down using f5 and f6, move it to the top, save and exit. The next time you reboot you ...


0

Ok I followed http://askubuntu.com/a/240831/440238 and deleted the Ubuntu boot stuff from Win10's efi partition. The Ubuntu uefi entries are now gone and Windows boots like normal I've had problems with Ubuntu before where it installs boot files to other HDDs when you specifically tell the installer not to, it really should be fixed.


0

It sounds like GRUB is broken. Try booting into the live CD again, open a terminal and type sudo update-grub. This should fix GRUB. Then the Ubuntu boot option in UEFI should go to GRUB which should let you choose between Ubuntu and Windows. I don't think that removing all traces of GRUB from your hard drive will solve your problems, unless you don't want ...


0

its /etc not /ect , looks like a typo. if you wanted to restore grub to defaults then just backup your grub files , purge the grub package and reinstall it.


1

The solution to the problem is to copy the two missing efi files from the ubuntu folder and create empty gbr files. After that I get the Grub menu immediately. $ cd /boot/efi/EFI $ sudo cp -p ubuntu/grubx64.efi Boot $ sudo cp -p ubuntu/MokManager.efi Boot $ sudo touch ubuntu/grubx64.efi.gbr $ sudo touch ubuntu/MokManager.efi.gbr


0

Yes and No On the most basic level, UEFI Secure Boot prevents running unsigned boot loaders. Modern versions of Ubuntu will boot and install normally on most PCs with Secure Boot enabled. But not all available tools and OS are having signed boot loaders. If you enable Secure boot and try to boot from say Hirans Boot CD, or If you manually add Grub Entries,...


1

The Ubuntu install process (not grub-installer itself, which will write to a target) writes to the sda's EFI partition regardless of what you tell it. There have been several bugs filed on this, with other potentially worse issues like having the machine's native boot entry changed. See bugs 1173457, 1229488, ... and many more if you search. Add yourself ...


0

First of all, your sda has a GPT partition table and your sdb has an msdos/MBR partition table. That's an incompatibility. For GRUB (Ubuntu's bootloader) to install correctly, you need to have both devices (sda and sdb) with the same type of partition table (either both MBR, either both GPT). Since GPT is more advanced than msdos/MBR, it's clever to use GPT ...


0

It's a very long ... question. I will try to clarify just some parts of it. ...using UEFI instead of BIOS is an inaccurate statement. As far as i know, a motherboard can have either a UEFI or BIOS, not both. There have been some early hybrids (UEFI+BIOS) motherboards, but they were rapidly abandoned because of multiple problems. If your HP was UEFI, it ...


0

I guess you have some data on Windows. So my advice you to boot from live CD and access the Windows partitions. Copy the data from there to another external drive, e.g. hard drive or USB. Now you are safe to experiment with dual booting. Next time while doing dual boot keep these things in mind: Unselect turn on fast startup (recommended) from power ...


0

When I look under the size of my device it says the total capacity is 967 GB is the Filesystem type is ext3/ext4. Because my harddrive is 1TB this to me seems as if the windows partition has been overwritten and added to this ubuntu partition. Oops, that seems as if Windows partition was indeed overwritten. Check partition layout in gparted or gnome-disks ...


-1

You don't have to use Disk Utility to make the partitions, since this is obviously the tool's limitation, why not use a different tool for partitioning such as a live CD? Arch and Ubuntu are not exactly the same when it comes to installing in UEFI. I recommend using the alternate medium to install ubuntu, select manual configuration and while installing you ...


0

Before doing anything else, this answer might already help you. 1. EFI-Boot You need to make sure the USB-drive boots in EFI-mode. If you can, disable legacy boot / legacy BIOS in your "BIOS". Now boot from your USB-key and run the live-system. Inside the live-system open a terminal (ctrl+alt+t) and run efibootmgr. This should show you all EFI ...


0

My few cents: a. You need to install both in uefi mode. W10 should already be installed in uefi. To do that for linux you must boot your usb stick in efi mode and then install normally. b. Don't make so many separate partitions for linux, use Logical Volume Management -LVM- (encrypted is even better) and combine root, swap and home into one primary partition....


0

The /boot/efi system partition is simply the boot partition created when the computers mother board runs UEFI rather than BIOS as is explained here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EFI_system_partition. I do not think that the partition would be effected by installing another distro; as the installer would need to detect the motherboard firmware during the ...


0

as @rancho pointed out it is not possible to add Ubuntu boot entry into the windows boot manager. However if you install Ubuntu as a dual boot with GRUB it will give you the choice that you are looking for albeit in a text format rather than a graphical one.


1

I also have a Lenovo Thinkpad 100 (not sure about the 's') and previously replaced the Win10 OS with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS 64-bit (I've just upgraded to 16.04). I created a bootable USB using Universal USB Installer and booted from that (using the weird concealed boot button next to the headphone socket - I use an unfolded paperclip). Hope that helps.


0

I give up the idea to convert the old installation from BIOS to EFI. Instead, I'll use @oldfred's suggestion to dual-boot through the MotherBoard when I need it. This has in fact advantages: I don't need to have a Grub-Menu waiting (even 3 seconds) to boot in my everyday system (16.04), thus I'll save time booting. When I want to boot the old system (14....



Top 50 recent answers are included