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0

i dont have a lot to contribute to this thread, other than to say that i have the same issue with the same laptop. its driving me insane.


0

It once happened to my and the problem was that my CMOS battery ran out of juice. It could be something else for you but this looks like a possible cause


0

Assuming that your Ubuntu installation is intact (not a safe assumption), you should be able to get up and running again as follows: Download the USB flash drive or CD-R version of my rEFInd boot manager. Prepare a medium from the downloaded files. If necessary, disable Secure Boot. (There are ways to do this with Secure Boot active, but they require ...


1

If you switch bios to legacy mode, then the system will probably boot with no problems. But there is no 100% guarantee that all hardware of the new motherboard id properly supported by linux kernel. In most cases it should work OK.


0

How to Convert MBR to GPT without Delete partition and Loss data Work here: http://cyber-sholeh.blogspot.com/2015/08/how-to-convert-disk-mbr-to-gpt-or-gpt.html https://youtu.be/Ow6qDv0yfgY


0

First, there are two distinct issues involved: BIOS vs. EFI -- This is the type of firmware on the computer; or in some cases, because EFIs include a BIOS emulation layer, EFI-based computers can boot in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode. The version of GRUB 2 installed on the computer depends on the firmware type. Under BIOS, a 16-bit GRUB 2 (from the grub-pc package, ...


0

Select try ubuntu before you install Open gparted Delete every partition on your hard drive, then click apply changes. Restart your computer, you will now be able to create partitions


1

I encountered a similar problem a while ago. Wrote down my solution here. I would go with the UEFI solution.


0

This is the longest post I've ever made on a StackExchange site, but this process requires a lot of explanation and attention to detail. It's also somewhat specific to the hardware in question, which requires more explanation. After a lot of headache, two accidental hard drive reformattings, and lots of frustration with HP's buggy firmware implementation, ...


0

My toshiba (EFI/GPT) started with pre-installed w8.1, and using a usb stick (unetbootin), I simply shrank w8 into a 40 GB 'broom closet' and then installed Mint (Ubuntu). I then had to use boot-repair-disk (see below) to stop windoze always behaving like it was the only kid on the block. The usb was prepared using unetbootin in w8.1 and thus probably ...


0

Okay, finally got it to work this morning. This time I installed both to the SSD again, making extra sure to direct Ubuntu to the Windows EFI partition during installation. The only two things I really did differently this time was formatting the HDD in GPT and running chkdsk three times on both the SSD and HDD, so thank you very much to oldfred for those ...


0

Fair Warning. You don't identify the 'Win 8' tablet. It may not even be possible for the brand/model you are using. For 'HP Stream 7' and 'HP Stream 8': (basically twins) Most of the information you need is here: http://www.amazon.com/gp/review/R21XA8UO4RTHR2/ref=cm_cr_pr_rvw_ttl?ie=UTF8&ASIN=B00NSHLVD2 He also has a blog which goes into more ...


0

There are few things to be considered, may be these can help you. -As of my experience UEFI installation does not ask whether to install grub, it is automatically installed on your EFI partition. -In order to check if your ubuntu installation has completed properly you can boot ubuntu live, mount the EFI partition and check whether grub is present there. ...


0

Try to check to boot from legacy mode and select boot from USB. Upon this selection your laptop should restart and quickly plugin your bootable USB. I have also encountered the same issue before. Playing around on bios startup fixed it. Hope this works.


0

The White Folder with a question mark means that your MAC is missing a important boot folder from you OS. If holding alt does not provide a solution: You can try to reinstall MAC osx my holding Command + R at start up and letting go when you hear the boot chime. It will boot into internet recovery.


0

For Windows 7 you need to enable legacy BIOS mode. After that boot from the Windows 7 installation disk and delete all partitions while installing so that entire disk is empty. Then add a new partition and it will automatically create a new partition table. Install windows 7 and then boot Ubuntu IN BIOS MODE (explore the boot optons) and install it alongside ...


0

Well, I'd recommend installing Ubuntu MATE (the supported remake of GNOME for modern versions of Ubuntu), but aside from that you should be fine. GRUB should recognize Windows automatically. Just make sure, if you can, to boot into the Ubuntu installer in EFI mode. You'll also want to set the SSD that Ubuntu is on to be before the Windows drive.


1

The problem is caused by the fact that a part of the GRUB boot loader remains installed on the computer, and is being launched by default. Unfortunately, the way Ubuntu sets up GRUB causes it to rely on files located on the Ubuntu partition, and since you've deleted that partition, those files effectively no longer exist. There are several possible ...


0

Legacy support should be enabled in BIOS. Go to boot options (machine specific method) and select the non UEFI Ubuntu entry to boot (after inserting installation media). If you see a pinkish screen, you have booted in BIOS mode. If you see grub boot loader in black background, means that you have booted in UEFI mode.


1

sudo hexdump -s 56 -e '"MSDM key: " /29 "%s\n"' /sys/firmware/acpi/tables/MSDM From a comment by David6 on superuser


1

Re-installing GRUB is almost certainly overkill, and carries a small risk of messing things up. Instead, try this: Boot to Windows. Open an Administrator Command Prompt window by right-clicking the Command Prompt icon and selecting the option to run it as Administrator. Type bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\ubuntu\shimx64.efi. Reboot. If you boot into ...


0

Write the Super Grub disk to a USB drive and boot from it. Start Ubuntu. If you are in Ubuntu, open a terminal and type sudo grub-install /dev/sda


1

I finally managed to install it correctly. I created the following partitions: /dev/sda1 150MB EFI (boot flag) /dev/sda2 50GB / /dev/sda3 4GB swap /dev/sda4 70GB /home Then I used the installer an click continue after the warning about UEFI mode. Then after the installation I click continue testing. I installed boot-repair: sudo ...


1

Okay, this is a bit of a process, so fair warning beforehand: it gets a little complex. You'll have to boot into the Ubuntu LiveCD, and select try Ubuntu. From there, mount your root partition. You can do this by going into the file manager and then clicking on "20GB Filesystem" (or something very similar to that - you'll know it when you see it on the ...


1

Here are a couple of things to try: Boot to a Live USB to make sure you still have data, etc. on your main drive. Use Gparted to make sure the boot flag is still there. Use Gparted to create a small 4GB or so partition and reinstall Ubuntu to that partition, or to another drive, internal or USB. (I did this once and accidentally repaired a non-booting ...


0

inside your boot directory, it should be like this: /boot/efi/EFI/Boot/ ----> BOOTx64.EFI if the file isn't there, you can issue the following command: sudo cp /boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu/grubx64.efi /boot/efi/EFI/boot/BOOTx64.EFI assuming boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu/grubx64.efi exists. if not, copy it from wherever you can find it inside EFI directory and its sub ...


0

Try 32 bit version of EFI. The windows you are using is 32 bit, so mbr is writed in 32 bit manner. You must use 32bit version of loader which will load you 64bit host OS


1

my boot loader have been destroyed. In this moment I have installed on my PC Windwos 8, Ubuntu 15 and Ubuntu 14 but just Ubuntu 15 have visible on bootloader Proper diagnosis of this type of problem requires more information, starting with the partition table information and GRUB configuration file. This information can all be gathered into one ...


0

Are you saying Kali initiated the "catastrophe"? Or did you go to Kali expecting to go from only Ubuntu 15 to a menu with 4 systems? Or were you destroying Ubuntu 15 and Ubuntu 14 at will because you didn't have anything there, simply you wanted some multi-boot experience? Anyway, if booting into Ubuntu 15 is OK and you haven't overwritten the "correct" ...


0

I've run into thus problem installing Ubuntu 14.04 on a Lenovo ThinkCentre M91p, and I've got a quick/easy solution: Before you boot from the Ubuntu install disk/USB, go into your BIOS and under the "Startup" tab change the "Boot Mode" from "Auto" to "Legacy". Install Ubuntu. If you want, change the Boot Mode in the BIOS back to Auto. That works ...


0

With Windows 10 and Ubuntu 14.04 on an Acer E17 I had a similar problem (Windows Boot Manager took over, couldn't access Grub on boot). I followed the instructions provided by Rod Smith above, but no luck. (very nice instructions, btw) I found a setting in the BIOS under boot order that listed the Windows Boot Manager first and the HDD second. I swapped ...


0

I faced the same problem on HP ProBook 4340s with original Windows 8 already overwritten by new Kubuntu 15.04 (I prefer no dual boot). Among other tries, I also tried Boot-Repair (both from HD after its installation and via boot-repair-disk), but that exercise was most probably unnecessary. What made the trick was the following changes in the BIOS Setup ...


5

To elaborate a bit on Fabby's answer: Modern EFI/UEFI-based computers can usually boot either in native EFI/UEFI mode or using a feature called the Compatibility Support Module (CSM), which enables them to boot using older BIOS-mode boot loaders. This latter mode is often called "legacy mode," so it has three names: BIOS, CSM, and legacy; all mean the same ...


1

Short answer There might not be a universal solution, so you may have to resort to different tools for different computers. Long answer It sounds like the students have their own computers, which in turn means that you're probably dealing with a dozen or more different models. If so, there are quite a few variables at play, including (but not limited to): ...


8

Don't do anything: apparently your Windows isn't installed in UEFI mode. (This is the first time on this site I've told someone not to do anything!) :-)


1

Is it important to create EFI system partition for partition table type MBR? No. Generally computers that came with partition table type MBR have BIOS. Newer computers that come with partition table type GPT, also come with UEFI instead of BIOS. If this is true for your computer, then your computer has BIOS and not UEFI. If there is no UEFI, there is no ...


2

When Windows is installed in Legacy BIOS (MBR) mode you do not need to create an EFI partition. When Windows is installed in UEFI mode you already do have an EFI partition. Then you have to install ubuntu in UEFI mode - the existing EFI partition will be used. Learn more : https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI


0

Press Esc before booting into windows


0

Use YUMI on Windows. Download here.


1

mount Stick sudo mount -t vfat /dev/sdX /mnt Install another Grub2 to USB: sudo grub-install --no-floppy --force --root-directory=/mnt /dev/sdX Copy iso to stick cp -v ~/live-cd.iso /mnt Add following to /mnt/boot/grub/grub.cfg set default="0" set timeout=10 insmod fat set iso_path=/live-cd.iso loopback loop (${usb})${iso_path} set root=(loop) set ...


-1

Unable to boot from USB is mainly with new systems that are installed with UEFI and not with old BIOS. if your ISO image is not booting. download an EFI ISO image and then write it to your USB. it will work fine. also in your BIOS do the below 1) turn off secure boot 2) put USB as first boot device 3) disable quick boot option of your windows happy ...


0

Running through USB (flashdisk,External HDD, etc) is not as faster as running through HDD. So the best one should be running through HDD because the link is more faster using SATA. You may refer for the speed on this link Speed comparison. For the trouble about UEFI you may refer to your motherboard BIOS firmware update. Most of major motherboard company ...


0

You could try installing GRUB, or enabling it, if it's installed: Boot the machine using a Live CD. Open a terminal. Find out the name of the internal disk by using fdisk to look up the device's size. For example: sudo fdisk -l Install GRUB boot loader onto the proper disk (the example below assumes it is /dev/sda): grub-install --recheck --no-floppy ...


0

When you shrink your main volume (or partition it), try leaving the free space UN-formatted. in windows it should say something like "unallocated space". (you can do this using disk management in windows, just right click and hit delete volume on the free partition you want to use). if that doesn't work, or if you had already done this, try the other way: ...


0

There is almost no difference. Boot time on UEFI may be a bit less. Besides UEFI has native support of GPT disks. But it is possible to get bios support of a GPT partitioned disk by creating a special partition this way. It is not worth the effort to force installing with UEFI if there are problems.


4

Yes you can, even with MBR partitioning. In principle, you "just" need to install an EFI boot loader for Linux. I put "just" in quotation marks because there are a lot of pesky details in this process that can turn it into a nightmare, particularly if you're unaware of the details or if something goes wrong when dealing with one of them: In theory, an EFI ...


-3

You can use the Wubi Method Of Installation like this. Open the downloaded ISO file. Run Wubi.exe. Select the relevant options on the Ubuntu Installer Window that open. Select "Reboot Now" and Click Finish. For more details on installing Ubuntu alongside Windows visit this link. This way you can easily re-install Ubuntu 15.04 alongside Windows 8.1.


0

First, one question is why you want to switch to EFI-mode booting. Based on your gdisk output, it looks like you've got a single-OS installation, so you don't seem to need to coexist with something else. If you can boot in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode already, why switch? As the saying goes, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." (OTOH, I see no BIOS Boot Partition, so ...


0

I don't know if it applies to 12.04, but on 14.04 I needed to boot up Ubuntu live and install grub-efi before running the ubiquity installer. Check [How to install Ubuntu 14.04 64-bit with a dual-boot RAID 1 partition on an UEFI/GPT system? for details. Your mileage may vary.


0

Have you tried to install grub-efi (example at this link although the may text is focuses on UEFI+RAID)? BTW, I'm confused about your real problem. Why to you want to switch to UEFI boot? And I thought that 'legacy boot' was equivalent to MBR boot, as opposed to UEFI/GPT boot.



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