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Some computers have EFIs that don't accept the Secure Boot signatures on some EFI binaries. I've seen this problem on my ASUS P8H77-I motherboard. Basically, take two signed binaries (say, shim1.efi and shim2.efi), both of which are recognized as properly signed by another motherboard. On my ASUS, just one of those binaries may be recognized as valid; the ...


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There are some peculiarities about your installation: Your computer has two Windows Recovery Environment partitions, /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda5. My guess is one is from your previous Windows installation and the other is for the new installation, but I can't be positive of that. I doubt if this duplication is causing you any problems per se; I mention it ...


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With Packard Bell EasyNote TE was impossible to disable Secure Boot unless we set a password in the Bios. Once we set up a password, we could change the Secure Boot value to false!


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From the output of your boot-repair command, it looks like you have an UEFI system… However, Ubuntu is installed in non-UEFI mode, and Windows is installed in UEFI mode so only one of the two is going to work at a time without changing the boot parameters… The best you can do is: re-install Windows 10 in non-UEFI mode or reinstall Ubuntu in UEFI mode ...


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Boot-Repair allows to easily do the EFI renaming via the "Rename Windows EFI files" option, but that option is not enabled by default because it's a dirty hack and it is not reliable in all situations. Instead, it is safer to change the UEFI boot order, when possible, or have bcd call grub, which is what Boot-Repair suggests (see the 4 last lines of your ...


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Ubuntu doesn't kill your USB 3.0 Chipset. Maybe you had a voltage spike when reset or the proverbial cosmic ray, or more probably: a bug in the firmware caused the problem! ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Anyway it is a problem that was not caused by Ubuntu.


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Can't believe: exactly the old dirty hack with manual renaming of EFI-files works. I wonder why Boot Repair didn't manage this.


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you could try this: boot from a ubuntu installation live usb and then run boot-repair again and use this custom repair and it might work fine this way.


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I've installed 32-bit versions of Ubuntu on systems with 32-bit EFIs, including both an ancient 32-bit Mac Mini and an ASUS T100. I don't have detailed documentation on how to do it, but I provide an outline in my answer to this question: 32-Bit UEFI Boot Support Either way you do it will involve significant hoop-jumping. My own preference is to stick with ...


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Install a 64 bit system. This gives you the option of upgrading your RAM at any point in the future. It also allows you to install 64 bit software which would otherwise not work on a 32 bit system.


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Booting Windows 7 in EFI mode on a Mac is tricky at best. (Note UEFI is EFI 2.x, but Macs' EFIs are all 1.x versions, so Macs technically don't have UEFIs.) There's a very long thread on MacRumors about this subject: http://forums.macrumors.com/threads/win7-x64-booting-natively-via-efi-no-bios-emulation.696523/ To boil this thread down, some people have ...


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I recommend you to use this tool to create a bootable USB. Make sure to select GPT partition scheme for UEFI comuters on second field.


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As Zilvador says, this could be a Secure Boot issue; however, Ubuntu should support Secure Boot, so I suspect that one of two other things is happening: Improperly-created USB drive -- Assuming no changes to a stock computer, you'll need a USB drive with an EFI boot loader installed on it (including Ubuntu's Secure Boot tool, which is called Shim). Some ...


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This sounds like a case of Secure Boot, which is a security mechanism added by hardware vendors in collaboration with Microsoft to only allowed the system to boot from approved ISO images. This mechanism can be a challenge when a user wants to install Ubuntu. Solutions depend on the UEFI in use, but it might entail disabling Secure Boot inside UEFI and then ...


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If you download and install the 64 bit version from here and install it from a USB, simply choose the option you are presented with to delete everything and replace with Ubuntu. The installer will take care of the partitioning for you.


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Connect a bootable USB drive to the USB port on your PC. Open the Charm Bar by pressing Windows Key-C. Click on Setting at the bottom and then Change PC settings. Click on General and scroll to the bottom and click on Advanced Startup -> Restart Now Click on Use A Device and finally click on Boot Menu. Click on the USB drive that you want to use to boot ...


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I got it work at Acer Aspire ES1-111-C827. Should be working on other devices, too. Probably the BIOS-entries are a bit different. All you have to do is to register the newly installed UEFI-file as trusted for executing in BIOS-security options. Before installation goto BIOS-Settings, make sure to have this: Security: set supervisor password; Boot - ...


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I'm glad you fixed the problem. For future reference, you can use GRUB (or any other EFI boot manager) to switch between two versions of Windows. The way I know to do this requires planning before installing your second Windows, though: Install the first Windows normally. Boot to a Linux emergency disk (the Ubuntu installer in "try before installing" mode ...


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I did "update-grub" and it solved the problem.


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You should be able to dual boot. Did you leave fast boot in UEFI on. That often is the major issue, as booting Windows is required to be fast per Microsoft. And then vendors rely on Windows menu entry to get into UEFI. But when Windows does not work? And did you leave fast startup in Windows on? You may be able to directly get into UEFI with full power ...


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FreeBSD is not Linux. If the laptop is crashing under both Linux and FreeBSD, then the problem is almost certainly not a software bug, since the code shared between the two kernels is negligible. Crashes under two OSes suggests that you've got bad hardware. This hypothesis is further strengthened by a Web search on "machine check exception," which turns up ...


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RobinHood's answer is worth considering. Boot Repair should be able to fix your problem; but some situations tend to confuse it, so it does sometimes fail. I have some more information and suggestions.... First, your /dev/sda5 is set up as a BIOS Boot Partition, which is used for BIOS-mode booting, not EFI-mode booting. Such partitions are normally 1MiB in ...


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Partition 5 is not necessary. This partition is not used for /boot from your description. You can delete it. SOLUTIONS: You need check the grub.cfg in EFI partition(partiton 1)\EFI\Ubuntu\grub.cfg. Correct the partiton for /boot. Example: search.fs_uuid d17d4033-8152-412f-ad06-f30ecde45d53 root hd1,gpt6 uuid for the partition can be found with blkid ...


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It's hidden by default. Take a look at /etc/default/grub and change it as necessary. Reference.


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I have an Acer that has the same problem. My solution is to "reboot" windows, rather than shutdown (which is really just a hybernate.) By rebooting (Which may trigger updates,) the system shuts down and you can select boot from the bios. You do have to catch it before it reboots. I rarely use windows so booting this way doesn't bother me at all. Unless, ...


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I'm not 100% positive, but a Mac that old probably has a 32-bit EFI, even if it's got a 64-bit CPU. (The first Intel-based Macs had 32-bit CPUs with 32-bit EFIs. When Apple updated to 64-bit CPUs, the EFIs lagged behind for a generation or so before the EFI was updated to 64-bit.) For a native EFI-mode boot, installing in EFI mode is most easily done with an ...


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I've installed UbuntuGNOME 15.04 just recently and v608 of Unetbootin for windows consistently failed to write a bootable image.I solved the problem by using imageusb to burn the iso on to the drive. You should also see the checksum of the .iso that could tell you if it's a corrupted download. To do that in windows if you have 8 or 8.1 is to open powershell ...


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Here is a detailed guide.Installing Ubuntu on a Pre-Installed Windows 8 (64-bit) System (UEFI Supported) Download the iso(you can only use the 64bit one with UEFI.), make sure that the download is not corrupted by getting it's checksum and comparing it with the one provided on the download site. You can do this on Windows8.1 by opening Powershell cd-ing to ...


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Fast boot option will be there in BIOS. You have to turn off that feature. Then select USB as boot device. Try any of these steps to get in to the BIOS. Either of these might work. To reach the BIOS when fast-boot is turned on, you should hold down the F2 key and then power-on the computer. OR Power on and press escape key for 3 seconds, A BIOS key ...


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Some EFIs can be flaky and lose functionality, such as the ability to launch their built-in boot managers, for no apparent reason. My guess is you've run into this problem. One approach you might take is to fix the firmware's problem. I don't know of a sure-fire procedure for doing this, though, so you'll have to either find help elsewhere (maybe somebody ...


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When Windows 10 - 64 bit boots in EFI mode, the file the firmware loads is located at /EFI/BOOT/bootx64.efi in the hidden EFI partition. Basically you moved and renamed grub 2 to this location and name. Your Mac thinks it is booting Windows when in fact it is boot grub 2. This is not because you have a new Retina MacBook Pro 2015 model (MacBookPro11,5). This ...


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Well, kind of stupid but I managed to make the external USB HDD boot. Ubuntu installs the EFI boot files under "EFI/ubuntu" by default, simply rename it to "BOOT", and copy "grubx64.efi" to "bootx64.efi" then everything works as expected. According comments from @RodSmith, above solution works as EFI/BOOT/bootx64.efi is the fallback name where EFI finds a ...


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Your problem is that your Windows installation is in EFI mode, but your disk is configured with a hybrid MBR, which forces Windows to treat the disk as an MBR disk. The Mac boot loader might also be taking this as a signal to attempt a BIOS-mode boot of Windows, but there's no BIOS-mode boot loader on the disk. Since Windows will boot in EFI mode only from a ...


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First, the default GRUB 2 configuration for Ubuntu sends GRUB 2 to the Ubuntu partition for some critical configuration and support files. This makes GRUB 2 reliant on files on both the EFI System Partition (ESP) and the Ubuntu root (/) or /boot partition. Thus, deleting the Ubuntu partition almost certainly did not damage the EFI System Partition (ESP). ...


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If you've done an EFI-mode installation, then 99.9% of the software you need is installed; the only thing left is a boot loader. Ordinarily, using Boot Repair might help; but with an existing Windows installation, you really need to run Boot Repair in EFI mode, which isn't working for you (from the installation medium, anyhow). Therefore, I suggest you try ...


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If Bootrec shows the “The requested system device cannot be found” error, the following steps will help build a new BCD: Type this command: bcdedit /export D:\BCDBackup Type d: where d: is where your Windows is installed Type cd boot Type this command: attrib bcd -s -h -r Type this command: ren d:\boot\bcd bcd.old Type this command: bootrec ...


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If both your OSes are booting in EFI mode, then there's no point in playing with the BIOS/CSM/legacy options in your firmware. Leave them disabled; enabling any such option is most likely to cause problems. You shouldn't need to adjust your firmware settings on a regular basis, so this sort of problem should be something that crops up pretty rarely. If you ...


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I know, this is a comment, but let this since i don't have enough reputation. (im using HTML here, too.) I don't understand what you're simply doing in the partitions. I think you can try booting to ubuntu, and then installing this application: Click recommended repair, wait for it to finish and try restarting. It may now show grub with Ubuntu.


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The partition table format in use on your disks normally requires you to create a separate partition for boot loader code. This partition should be marked for use as “EFI boot partition” and should be at least 35 MB in size. Note that this is not the same as a partition mounted on /boot. This is a reference to an EFI System Partition (ESP). As described ...


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Yep, there should be no issues. I dual booted 8.1 and KUbuntu 15.04 for a while and even managed to uninstall it when I didn't need it anymore to just have Windows 8.1 with no issues. All while on UEFI, I didn't try it on ATA though but both ways it should work flawlessly.


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Some solutions: Try making the BIOS settings go to default. Usually there is an option that says "revert settings" or even "set to optimized bios settings" or "revert to default." Maybe you made a mistake when you were changing BIOS settings. Depending on your BIOS you can actually open a page that lets you choose what drive you want to boot from instead ...


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So the link @Pilot6 shared worked for me. Somewhere in that long post I read that one of the problem might be that your windows partition is damaged so I checked and repaired it. After a reboot I could select to install Ubuntu alongside windows. I am writing this very post from my Ubuntu installation. Thanks a lot ! So if anyone else has this problem, ...


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My computer is custom built so it is NOT UEFI based. This logic is flawed. Most motherboards introduced since mid-2011 are UEFI-based. Most of these motherboards also provide a Compatibility Support Module (CSM), which is essentially a BIOS emulator -- a CSM enables an EFI-based computer to boot using BIOS-mode boot loaders, much like WINE enables Linux ...


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What do you mean green box? can you be more specific? If it is not uefi mode, your disk should be MBR disk, which won't allow you to have more than 4 primary partitions.you will not have the option to convert to basic disk in disk management if it is a dynamic disk unless you delete all volumes on it. You can use third party software, such as AOMEI Partition ...


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You have newer UEFI capable hardware, but installed in CSM/BIOS boot mode. CSM - UEFI Compatibility Support Module (CSM), which emulates a BIOS mode You then always need to boot in CSM mode, not UEFI nor UEFI with secure boot on. Only in CSM/BIOS mode. It looks like you booted Boot-Repair in UEFI mode & it tried to repair for UEFI boot, but without ...


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Ordinarily, installing Ubuntu will make the following changes: Create partition(s) for Ubuntu and install Ubuntu files on that/those partition(s). These changes can be restricted to your external disk without too much difficulty, provided you pay attention during the installation process. Install the boot loader. This can mean: If the install is in BIOS ...


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For most hardware, the boot mode (EFI vs. BIOS) is irrelevant. The drivers Linux loads are identical in either case, as should be the performance. The main caveat here is that the hardware may be initialized in different ways depending on your boot mode, and if the Linux drivers make assumptions about how the hardware is initialized, one way or the other may ...


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Do you need to boot from a ----------- partition more than 2 TiB in size? | | no yes | | | | | Do you REALLY need to boot from a | partition more than 2 TiB in size? | ------------ | | | yes | no ...


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So my suspicion about emptiness of the EFI partition was not without reason. Ubuntu has not been installed fully because laptop went down due to overheating. I reinstalled it and it seems to be booting now.


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You need to use the GRUB holdshift script. If you read the GRUB man carefully you woll notice that what you want is not achievable via standard settings. Just download the script here GRUB holdshift and follow the instructions in the readme.



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