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An additional important point if you want both Windows and Ubuntu to be bootable through EFI: When you select the Installation Type of "Something else" and then get the screen that allows you to do partitioning, select the EFI partition (e.g. /dev/sda1, not /dev/sda) for "Device for boot loader installation". This is allows GRUB to work together with EFI. ...


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Use the Windows 8 disc, or the repair disc that came with your computer, boot from the disc and repair the Windows MBR.


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You need to create a biosgrub partition on a GPT partitioned disk when setting up legacy booting or an EFI boot partition (for both GPT or MBR partitioned disk) when setting up UEFI booting. GRUB requires a BIOS Boot Partition (2 MiB, no filesystem, EF02 type code in gdisk or bios_grub flag in GNU Parted) in BIOS systems to embed its core.img file due ...


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From the Ubuntu side, install the efibootmgr package, and check its man page sudo apt-get install efibootmgr man efibootmgr You should be able to both rename entries, and reorder them if you want. efibootmgr -v will show you what is actually being run, so you can see the name of the bootloader file being used for Windows (bootmgfw.efi was the ...


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For sure, there is a safe way to hide an entry from rEFInd boot menu. I would suggest you to use "dont_scan_files" or "don't_scan_files" parameter in "refind.conf". To add the EFI file to hide in addition to the default ones, you may use the following: dont_scan_files + NameOfTheEFILoaderToHide.efi For more details about the configuration of rEFInd Boot ...


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First, throw away your BIOS assumptions! Under EFI, the unit of bootability is a boot loader file, not a hard disk. That is, you don't "choose the HDD it is installed to as the boot device"; you choose the boot loader file for an OS. This may seem like a subtle nit-picky issue, but it's fundamental to understanding -- and therefore properly manipulating -- ...


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If your second hard disk is seen as a "removable media" like a USB, it can have its own EFI partition, and uses the default bootloader /EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi. For non-secure boot, copy the unsigned grubx64.efi as the bootx64.efi. For secure boot, copy shimx64.efi to bootx64.efi, and put a copy of the signed grubx64 into /EFI/Boot too. Have the grub.cfg ...


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I answer my own question above in the form of a newbie step-by-step guide for getting Ubuntu 14.04 and Windows 8.1 dual booting on an HP 15 Notebook sold in the US. Thanks to all above who provided their own answers and follow-up questions to my own question and for putting up with my ignorance and nevertheless helping me along the way. Most of what follows ...


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The issue, unbeknownst to me, was that I ran apt-get upgrade and forgot that I did. It had a kernel fix, and this version was unable to find /boot/efi, I suppose.


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The problem is that you've mixed your installation modes -- Windows in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode and Ubuntu in EFI/UEFI mode. GRUB can't switch between these two boot modes, so you'll need to either re-install one of your OSes so that they both use the same boot mode or find some other way to switch boot modes. For re-installing, it's likely to be easier to ...


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Secure Boot is usually OK, but can sometimes cause problems, so it's best to disable it during troubleshooting. Ideally, it will provide some added protection against pre-boot malware (which usually targets Windows but can theoretically affect any OS), so it's worth having -- IF it doesn't cause any other problems. It's possible that Secure Boot is causing ...


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GRUB can fail to install because of filesystem damage on the ESP. Another clue that this may be an issue is your Boot Repair output, which has generated multiple entries for certain files. This could be a Boot Repair bug, but it's also possible that it indicates damage to the underlying filesystem. You can check the filesystem on the EFI System Partition ...


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There are advantages to EFI mode (such as faster boot times and better access to firmware settings from the OS), but for a single-boot installation, either should work fine, and neither should pose any danger of physical damage to the computer. Note the shoulds, though. There is at least one known bug that can cause EFIs to brick themselves if too much data ...


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It doesn't really matter which you install it in. If you need to install Ubuntu in Legacy Mode, go right ahead. I would recommend though that you try to delete all partitions before running the installer.


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YOU TRY THE INSTALL from w8? via wubi? microsoft is doing us wrong.... it happens to me but w7 64, then i backup and try again, reinstall w7 from backup / restore and install again ubuntu 14.04 avoiding wubi... there is a problem when you run the install from cd...INSIDE WINDOWS via wubi and certain choices ones mde it writes MBR with grub from win and ...


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Found the winning combo for my situation. This trashes all Raid/Physical Partitions/LWM, etc so the seed install starts out with a totally clean slate. Tested and confirmed on multiple boxes with multiple partition schemes in place. # Disk Partitioning # Use LVM, and wipe out anything that already exists d-i partman/early_command string vgs -separator=: ...


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I had the same issue here. To fix, try the steps below: Disable secure boot, fastboot, etc... (you have already done that); When installing Ubuntu, choose manual partitioning and create the partitions as follows: An ext4 partition for system and home (if you want). Mount point: / A swap partition. I normally use 50% of available RAM; A ext2 partition for ...


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If a boot device option does not appear for your device: Check the options in the firmware menus to enable or disable BIOS-compatibility mode. To use BIOS-compatibility mode, check for options in the firmware menus to disable UEFI SecureBoot features. For older PCs (Windows® 7-era or earlier), look for options to Boot from file, and browse to the ...


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The z option in gdisk completely destroys the partition table, so you effectively no longer have your Windows installation. I know of at least four solutions to this problem: Call the manufacturer, get a Windows restore disk, and restore the system to the factory default. Obtain a Windows retail disk and install it to your computer. Use TestDisk or some ...


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Setting the password in BIOS/uefi worked for me also. After I could disable secure boot. The instructions are here: http://acer--uk.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/27071/~/how-to-enable-or-disable-secure-boot Also I noticed that afterwards it would skip straight to windows. I didn't need to use boot repair though. Just go back into bios/uefi and ...


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Did you deleted windows 8 (C drive) Partion ? Boot for ubuntu live cd and make sure you din't delete c drive, if you done so most probably your grub is messed.


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I managed to boot to Ubuntu! I realized these steps: 1 - I use efibootmgr as LiveWireBT me advised. 2 - Windows with EasyBCD software I change the status of Ubuntu. I put "System default" and placed first in the list (see screenshot) 3 - I remove all the "Windows Boot Manager" entries EXCEPT Windows 8.1 4 - When I reboot my PC I had access to the Grub ...


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I post an answer because i have many things to share ! 1 - Thanks to @LiveWireBT i have create a new entry (named Ubuntu) with EFI Boot Manager and i can choose it with the Windows boot Manager. But when i choose Ubuntu my computer didn't want to boot on it. It boot on Windows. 2 - After I use easybcd thanks to @user305306 and i see that Windows 8.1 is the ...


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This is a longshot, but it sounds like your machine might be making it past the BIOS and then just hanging at boot. My MBP used to do this. Had something to do with not being able to resume from the memdisk when booting from EFI. Every boot would take me to the same screen you're getting. If this is the case, and you are indeed getting through the BIOS, ...


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Your issue BootNext: 0009 BootCurrent: 000F Timeout: 0 seconds BootOrder: 000F,0008,0009,000A,000B,000C,0007,000D,000E,0001 Boot0001* Windows Boot Manager ...


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Get easybcd problem solved i have two Linux OS on my computer with windows 7 http://download.cnet.com/EasyBCD/3000-2094_4-10556865.html


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Hi and thank you for your anserwers ! @FuzzyToothpaste : I have not found the boot order menu in my BIOS i can just select if I wan't to boot my Hard Drive or my External Drive. I install efibootmgr and I change the boot order (my new order is : 000F,0001,0009,000A,000B,000C,0007,000D,000E,0008) but there is no effect (i don't know if the boot order is ...


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In nearly every BIOS ever made, there is a little something called boot order. This is still an option in today's UEFI systems. However, GRUB is started as soon as Ubuntu boots, and when you choose Ubuntu in GRUB, it continues the boot process. If you choose Windows, it "redirects" you to the Windows partition and boots. (That is the best way I know how to ...


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Hewlett-Packard's UEFI has been giving me heartache for a while. Your fix helped me to restart my HP laptop in GRUB again - without pressing F9 first. I had one problem: after your fix, I could select Windows 8 in GRUB, but Windows 8 then refused to start and I was shown the GRUB menu again. My fix: Copying the original Microsoft efi-file to ...


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Do you use a 64 bit version, with 12.04.2/12.04.3 release? They are the only ones which work with UEFI. Any idea of what video chip you have? Editing the grub "Try" command to add "nomodeset" might help. Thanks to ubfan1 for the answer.


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In theory, almost anything that both the Linux kernel and GRUB (or whatever boot loader you use) can read is suitable for /boot. Most distributions default to ext4fs, but I've used ext2fs, ext3fs, and XFS with no problems under Ubuntu. I don't recall offhand if JFS is supported at installation. If so it should work fine, too. ReiserFS, HFS+, and FAT are not ...


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I use ext2 (more of a habit), you can use ext3, ext4 too for grub2, it is not that important. Nowdays on modern Linux distros ext2, ext3 and ext4 are equally supported so it means you can use one of them. source: http://superuser.com/questions/470688/why-100mb-ext2-boot-partition-recommended-for-linux


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Ok, do you have multiple /boot/efi partitions? If so, follow these instructions (DON'T USE BOOT REPAIR): Find the /boot/efi partition for Windows using fdisk -l|grep EFI and select the 260 MB one. Remember the number (e.g. /dev/sda**2**) vi /etc/grub.d/40_custom Paste this: menuentry 'Microsoft Windows 8' { set root='hd0,gpt**2**' chainloader ...


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I have Ubuntu on a USB, and I have toured it on that device. When I tried to install Ubuntu on the HD, I did not get the option of installing it along with Windows. The "Install Alongside" option is (almost?) always missing when doing an EFI-mode install of Ubuntu. You'll have to either use the "Something Else" option or completely wipe Windows from the ...


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You've actually raised four distinct issues: Secure Boot -- In theory, disabling Secure Boot should not be necessary to install Ubuntu 14.04 (or even a couple versions before that). Practice usually follows theory, but sometimes it doesn't -- some computers just don't seem to get along well with Shim (the program that Ubuntu uses to work with Secure Boot). ...


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The question of disabling/enabling SecureBoot really is device-specific, but I don't know about enough models to answer that. It has worked on a few laptops for me but on most I have had to disable it. As a general answer, turn it off. As for FastBoot, the thing is, it will make your Windows partition unreadable to Ubuntu. The Windows partition will be ...


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You have to install the package grub-efi-amd64-bin on your running live-system. You can do this by using the following command: sudo apt-get install grub-efi-amd64-bin


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Use Universal USB Installer to load your iso to the USB stick. It makes USB Bootable of a lof kinds of OSes (include Windows, Linux, and more). I tried to make LiveUSB with a lot of tools, but this tool works perfect.


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If you would prefer to check from Ubuntu: In Ubuntu open the terminal and type "sudo parted -l". Scroll to the part with information on the disk your Windows installation is using. Under "Partition Table:" it should say gpt or msdos. GPT is required for Windows to run in UEFI mode. msdos means you're using BIOS/Legacy Mode.


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In Windows 8 go to the start screen Right click on "command prompt", and choose "run as administrator". [If you can't find it look under all programs.] In command prompt type "diskpart.exe". In diskpart type "list disk". It will show a * under the GPT column for disks using GPT. Windows requires GPT in order to run in UEFI mode. Alternatively, another ...


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As you say that you "wish to scrap what there is earlier" (if I understand you correctly) you seem to have the option to either set up a raid (as it appears to have been as you got it) or use the SSD disks as separate storage devices. The latter should be the easier option. In that case I'd suggest you click on "Unallocated space" as shown in the image ...


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While trying to install linux mint 17, I stuck in the same problem. In my case there was no gfxmode $linux_gfx_mode line in grub so what I did is to add nomodeset BEFORE quiet splash. Check that http://askubuntu.com/a/207177/34553 for what nomodeset is.


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Despite what you say in your edit, I have to suspect you have bad RAM. Sometimes bad RAM creates more problems in one OS than in another, just because of the way each OS uses RAM. I therefore recommend that you run a memory-test program. On an EFI-based computer, the commercial (but free) memtest86 can do the job; there's a version that will run in the EFI, ...


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I had a similar problem - Windows 8 machine that previously had dual boot working - did not allow Windows boot. OP's solution (re-enabling the backed up EFI file) did allow me to boot Windows again - but then GRUB would not show and I was stuck with only Windows. I was able to re-enable GRUB by running this command in Windows: Open an Administrator Command ...


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Forget EasyBCD; the last I heard, it was useless for dual-booting on EFI-based computers, and so is a dead end. Some HPs have badly broken EFIs that will boot only the EFI/BOOT/bootx64.efi or EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi files. There's a possibility that a firmware update is available that will fix the problem, so go looking for that first. (HP will ...


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@sd14 I am new to linux too. There are quite a few good tutorial. Do quick google search you will find a few? I have summarized a few that you might find helpful. DUAL boot issues with windows 8 and Ubuntu 12.04 Dual boot with Windows 8.1 on Toshiba Satellite Also give a little bit more detail on what you have done with your outcome. This way you will ...


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Install ubuntu on windows 8 with intel smart response For anyone else having this problem this was the final step that made the installation work. I had to find the intel gui and disable the acceleration. The installation still did not recognize that I had an OS installed, but it could find my hard drive and everything worked fine after that, because I ...


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Your problem is similar to many others that have been reported here. See: Ubuntu 14.04 not booting before Windows 8.1 Ubuntu 13.04 on UEFI system with Windows Boot Manager as the main loader Can't boot into Ubuntu after Windows 8.1 upgrade, boot-repair doesn't fix it Basically, you should be able to fix the problem using bcdedit in Windows, by ...


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I'm going to take these out of order, since some of the early lines refer to later ones. The bulk of the output is the Boot#### lines, which describe boot options. Boot0000 Setup Boot0001 Boot Menu Boot0002 Diagnostic Splash Your example output includes a large number of options like these, which have names but no further elaboration. These are ...


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You can get a detailed explanation of the efibootmgr package with the command: man efibootmgr It explains the output you get from efibootmgr in great detail.



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