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-1

This post at glandium.org might be of interest: Debian EFI mode boot on a Macbook Pro, without rEFIt, as bigbadonk420 pointed out in a comment This worked for me.


0

The procedure goes as follows: I installed a fresh copy of Windows 8.1 Pro by buying the app and making a bootable USB drive (see www.intowindows.com/how-to-install-windows-7vista-from-usb-drive-detailed-100-working-guide/). During the Windows setup process, I chose the custom type of installation, in which I was allowed to configure partitions. I erased ...


0

It turns out I booted the installer into the BIOS mode. See this article. I tried to boot the installer into UEFI mode on that lenovo but the screen flashed once and then it just halted. I tried to use the same live USB on another PC and it installed ubuntu to UEFI mode just fine. So there is something wonky with that Lenovo.


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okay...here is what has happened... you have created a non-efi capable linux installation medium (your linuxu usb disk) and a windows installation medium so that's why it doesn't work on EFI mode ON (apparently your linux usb-disk is corrupted, you need to recreate it. please keep reading) so you have two choices leave EFI mode OFF and install both OSes ...


0

It does not answer your question but may solve your problem. You can develop C# under Ubuntu using mono http://www.mono-project.com/ (it's cross platform)


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I fixed it. I restarted Ubuntu and went into boot options. then I turned on Legacy Boot and it worked!


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I realized that the hard disk has gpt partitioning and not the mbr, so I'm allowed to create up to 128 primary partitions.


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Try to create bootable usb drive with Ubuntu Startup Disk Creator (not sure if it works but worked for me before). Don't try to install it before reading more about UEFI bios and the GPT partition system. PS: If you mess up your boot loader don't panic and try to boot with >>>Super Grub<<< Once you have booted successfully with Super Grub ...


2

since Windows 8 is not on your plans (and from what I could read in your question, I think it is not working anymore), only Ubuntu, my suggestions for your specific hardware which I also happen to have are the following taking into consideration that you have made a backup of everything you need from the hard drive and that Windows 8 does not matter. So with ...


0

I got it. I guess my laptop has some kind of hybrid BIOS+UEFI/EFI sistem because it only accepts UEFI/EFI Ubuntu's installation. The cause of the problem was this Shim + SecureBoot bug. So I did this: 1) Disable FastBoot and Hibernation on Windows 8.1 2) Disabe QuickBoot on BIOS Then I still get the "booting in insecure mode" message, but only for 2 ...


0

I had similar problems with dual-booting Win8 and Ubuntu, and later I found it was because of FastBoot. Here are the steps you should follow in order to be able to boot into Windows and Ubuntu. Back up Windows Create a bootable Ubuntu USB drive Shrink your Windows partition Turn off fast boot Turn off secure boot Install Ubuntu Boot Repair Fix the boot ...


0

It is available in Ubuntu14.10 release notes that SecureBoot is disabled for UEFI system, You can refer the below release note An update to shim in 14.10 introduces a bug where, when booting on a UEFI system with SecureBoot disabled, the boot is delayed for two seconds and a message "Booting in insecure mode" is displayed on the screen. This message does ...


1

Usually there is a service key or shortcut that resets the BIOS/UEFI to defaults, e.g. hold PgUp while switching the power on. You could maybe google whether such a key is existing for your machine or UEFI. Once that is done, you will be able to access the BIOS again!


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To Answer your question about the backgrounds 'persisting'. The backgrounds all vanished in the reformat, but the second you signed in to windows with your Live ID, the settings and backgrounds got download and copied back on to your computer. Occam's razor at work :)


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After barely restrainin myself from throwing the PC out of the window, I created an empty partition and installed Windows in it. So you had an EFI installation of Windows at/after this point? If your answer is yes, then that was good, and we can start troubleshooting from here. After the installation, the system booted Windows by default (no GRUB ...


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It is possible after all - adding .efi boot loaders into Windows Boot Manager but at least on my motherboard is a very bad idea because the change is permanent - eg. after booting to Ubuntu from Windows Boot Manager you will always boot to Ubuntu because it directly edits the UEFI boot config. Also achieving this can be done only by manually editing the BCD ...


0

YES PROBLEM SOLVED!!! But in a very silly way. I'm eager to tell you. It is because of a bug in: Startup disk creator. As I told I'm using startup disk creator to create a bootable USB. I MUST use a 64 bit version of Ubuntu but I also had downloaded the image: ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-i386.iso When starting Startup disk creator in Ubuntu 12.04 LTS BOTH ...


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All of the /home on HDD, OS on SSD At a minimum, split your / from your /home for your "production" OS (Ubuntu). If you want to split even more have a look at the FHS. 64GB /, 2TB /home One swap partition for both OSes (Minimum size = RAM, Max size=RAM*2) If Arch is to mess around with, 32GB /, 512 GB /home Yes, not all of your disk space is allocated: ...


0

You nuked a bit too much and deleted your UEFI partition as well: UEFI firmware does not reside in the BIOS any more, but on-disk... Use the Dell Recovery DVD to restore your system to a workable state, then follow this: Installing Ubuntu on a Pre-Installed Windows 8 (64-bit) System (UEFI Supported) then shrink Windows to the minimum+20% allowed size and ...


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You now have only 2 options: Restore your system back-up (you're definitely user type 4) Order an Apple Recovery DVD As you probably don't have #1 (or you wouldn't be asking this question) you should starting making system back-ups after you've painstakingly restored your system so this never happens again...


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In a UEFI system, the firmware does not get loaded from ROM any more: if gets loaded from disk (into RAM) So if you want do re-define your UEFI menu: Make a system back-up first (You're definitely user type 4) Go into the UEFI menu settings and upgrade the UEFI firmware Then delete the menu items you don't need any more. If anything goes wrong in 2 and ...


2

I have been running Ubuntu 14.10 in a dual-boot configuration on my Asus EeeX205T for a couple of months now. Some things do not yet work -- internal wifi/bluetooth, sound, power management -- but with a usb wifi adapter, enough works, and works well enough, that I have used it as a travel machine -- a role in which it excels. Here is how I set it up to ...


0

When you boot up hold the SHIFT key. If Ubuntu installed correctly, GRUB should load and give you options for which OS you want to start. Try and post results.


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This is a bug, specifically bug 1159016. The solution is described in this AskUbuntu post. Basically you just have to add the word persistent in boot/grub/grub.cfg after creating the live USB: menuentry "Try Ubuntu without installing" { set gfxpayload=keep linux /casper/vmlinuz.efi persistent file=/cdrom/preseed/ubuntu.seed boot=casper quiet ...


-1

No there isnt any share between the two OS's. Ubuntu os will be found in the computer menu(containing the partition you created Ubuntu on) while windows os will be on the windows drive you see on the Ubuntu desktop.


0

Boot Live CD / Live USB, select try ubuntu Once it's loaded, open terminal CtrlAltT Do the following sudo mount /dev/sda8 /mnt sudo mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev sudo mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc sudo mount --bind /sys /mnt/sys sudo chroot /mnt NOTE: the /dev/sda8 is your ubuntu partition, from what i see in your pastebin file. Double check ...


0

I could be wrong (never ran a mac myself), but your BIOS/grub setup should have no impact on your available memory. You could always check by running free -h to see your memory allotment. But it seems that if you're not running in a VM then you should have access to your full system capabilities.


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Just from reading your first error message ("mkdir: cannot create directory ‘/media/winusb_iso_1423415599_8150’: Permission denied") it looks like you need more permission to create directories in `/media'. If you appended sudo to the start of your command, it would run winusb as root and give it permission to create (and delete) just about everything: ...


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I am answering my own question for future references. Problem: My laptop comes with locked UEFI mode. So there is no option to disable UEFI boot. Still i can boot usb flash drive in non UEFI mode. Solution: I have created a new partition of 200 MB, format fat32 and set mount point as EFI boot. Other options of installation process are same. Also Ubuntu ...


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It should be the same as any install to a second drive. And you do want an efi partition on the flash drive and grub installed to that drive. But when I installed a second Ubuntu to my HDD, it overwrote the efi partition on my SSD. So backup main drive's efi partition. You can then just copy efi partition from main drive to flash drive if it still ...


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There is a walk through of installation of Ubuntu in EFI mode on the Community WIKI. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI#Installing_Ubuntu_in_EFI_mode I could not find anything on installing to a flash drive but it would seem that the principle should be the same.


0

If you burn the Ubuntu 14.04 or 14.10 x64 ISO image correctly, then the result should be a UEFI bootable DVD. There may be issues with the firmware not allowing to boot from DVD via UEFI, firmware bugs/incompatibilities or an unclear user interface. Simply copying the data from the ISO image to a USB stick would be the easier way to create UEFI only live ...


0

As Jeremy31 said the WiFi card isn't working (hopefully will get support in the short term) and to answer my other question I installed the bootloader in the same partition that had Window's bootloader (the ~300MB UEFI one) and everything worked perfectly. Didn't have to disable secure boot or anything at all and I can boot both OSs. Thanks!.


1

I actually had to select try Ubuntu before installing and install through the live disc. I suggest trying this in addition to selecting nolapic + acpi=off to anyone encountering the same problem


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Helo Try this metode if you've grub installed: In Terminal: sudo update-grub edit by NANO or vii /etc/default/grub and modify if in GRUB_TIMEOUT= 0 modify for ex 5 and SAVE; easier in Midnight Commander (apt-get install mc)(sudo -s ENTER, mc ENTER)!!!/etc/default/grub and F4!!!!(sudo -s ENTER, mc ENTER) again sudo update-grub Close the terminal and ...


0

This is not a fix for the issue but an alternative. I decided to use a Live DVD and rEFind according to this tutorial: Freya on a Mac As the rEFInd version used in the tutorial is older than the one I used (v0.8.3 vs. v0.8.4), some steps changed. Here are changes I applicated: Step 4: I only type ./install.sh --alldrivers 'cause --esp is no more ...


1

Both your #1 and #2 options are possible; however, if you don't understand the Mac's native EFI-mode booting and how the Mac implements BIOS/legacy booting, you're likely to make a hash of things in setting it up. My suspicion is that you installed Ubuntu in BIOS/legacy mode with a BIOS-mode version of GRUB, which means that GRUB will be unable to launch OS ...


1

You're right to be wary. Although the replacement of grub-efi-amd64 by grub-pc will probably leave the major GRUB EFI file intact, GRUB may become confused by changes to its configuration file -- or it might not, since this is a luck-of-the-draw sort of thing. I haven't seen this specific issue for a while, but when I did it often resulted in boot problems ...


1

As of January 2015, the bios for UEFI in HP laptops (probably any HP computer) is broken. Every time the bios runs, it overwrites the boot sequence to make sure that Windows boots. As a temporary workaround, you can interrupt the boot sequence and choose to boot ubuntu (in my laptop, the sequence is Esc, then F9). However, that is probably not a good ...


0

A UEFI install keeps bootloaders on the EFI System Partition, while an MBR install like you did before keeps one bootloader in MBR or unformatted BIOS_GRUB partition on GPT partition table. No matter what you did before, if you re-install in UEFI mode no old and new bootloaders will interfere with each other. If you hadn't accidentally installed from 32-Bit ...


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Please make a back-up of your data first! You don't need to uninstall Ubuntu to install Windows: Just boot the Windows Installation CD and re-format the hard drive in the Windows set-up screen. Sorry to see you go! :-(


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Think this article might help you out, it goes into detail on how to fix grub and remove it etc.. Easy linux tips project Ive added the how to from the above link below so the site rules are followed. id suggest to anyone before installing any Linux on a partition or hard drive to try it out on a virtual machine first. if your only going to use it for ...


0

This worked for me HP UEFI doesn't boot Ubuntu automatically. I added customboot value (EFI\ubuntu\grubx64.efi) in the bios and now it boots up into ubuntu automatically.


-1

In order to install from a USB device you may need to include a USB installer on the media. Doing so will allow your computer to recognize the media as bootable. You may be able to use the same process used to make a bootable pendrive. Try going to www.Ubuntu.com/download/desktop/create-a-usb-stick-on-windows. I did this process with a 2 GB pen drive and got ...


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I've solved this issue: I've created USB install windows 8.1 disk on my windows desktop. I launched laptop from this usb flash. And the I selected repair menu -> advanced repair setting -> startup repair (I do not know exact english words, because I've used russian language). That's it. I hope it would be helpful for someone.


0

Booting the GRUB EFI binary directly should work. For newer Macs there shouldn't be any difference between a normal UEFI install on Windows or on a Mac. For older Macs you need to bless the GRUB EFI binary, the Mactel tools PPA provides tools to make the setup easier. You can even boot an external Ubuntu installation, as I described in Is it still possible ...


0

It appears to me that I've answered my own question. After formatting the external drive and doing a clean install of 14.04 (as opposed to 14.10) I was still having the same problems. It would seem, after a great deal more reading on the subject, that either through my own sheer ignorance or mysterious dual UEFI Bios gremlins I managed to install a ...


1

By chance I could fix it myself. The command parameters "-o 0,80" as written in many tutorials on the net seem not to work and even more irritating efibootmgr does not complain a second about it. The correct command is sudo efibootmgr 0000,0080 Like that everything works fine.


0

That is a lot of lines in that grub.cfg, I use a real basic one for my multiboot USB's, pretty much a set timeout & set default & a few menuentry's... I tried cutting away all the graphics-related stuff, and functions too, and was left with what might work as a no-frills grub.cfg to try out (keep the original as a backup, though it is pasted to ...


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You can uninstall Grub Bootloader by following this tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KV84OabGB08 But I suggest you Ubuntu operating system instead of Microsoft Windows. Because Ubuntu means "compassion and humanity". It is a free and open source operating system. Better than Windows in every aspect.



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