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1

On my ThinkPad Ubuntu 14.04 went into the infinite loop, Ubuntu 15.04 did not. Furthermore: proper shutdown in Windows UEFI on (important) CSM yes SecureBoot off After installing Ubuntu, only boot to Windows was possible: boot Ubuntu from live and install + run boot-repair. This way grub is the first thing that comes up. Windows boot loader can be ...


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Fundamentally, the issue is not the partition table type (GPT vs. MBR); it's the firmware type and boot mode (EFI/UEFI vs. BIOS/CSM/legacy). Windows ties them together quite tightly -- Windows may boot in EFI/UEFI mode only from GPT disks, whereas it may boot in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode only from MBR disks. Because of this, if you boot the Windows installer in ...


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Some shot-in-the-dark suggestions, in no particular order: Disable Secure Boot in your firmware setup utility. Download the USB flash drive or CD-R version of rEFInd and boot from it. If you can get it, you can attempt subsequent repairs from your full installation. Use an emergency boot system to install any EFI boot loader of your choice. Many of these ...


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please boot your kubuntu with live disk and run terminal then update your grub menu with this command sudo update-grub additional help: ubuntu help


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For me, booting Ubuntu in UEFI mode with the Nvidia drivers loaded, also always resulted in the well-known black screen when X was started. That was until yesterday! After running into some very promising info in another thread about installing Windows 7 in UEFI mode on a Mac. Folks over there struggled with Windows 7's required int 10h legacy support and ...


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You will likely want to dual boot because there are still some driver issues. Namely around the discrete GPU and the webcam. I wrote a blog post about doing just this which you might find helpful [1], the last step explains how to get WIFI working. [1] http://fromanegg.com/post/82251710943/how-to-install-ubuntu-on-a-mac-or-macbook


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I managed to figure this one out however I had to reinstall both Windows 8.1 and Ubuntu 14.04. I had to ensure that both operating systems were installed on UEFI by disabling CSM and booting from UEFI mode. I also followed this guide: http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2014/05/31/dual-boot-ubuntu-14-04-windows-7-on-a-pc-with-2-hdds-and-uefi-firmware/ Thank you so ...


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I finally resolved this - without resorting to a third bootloader, and without running boot-repair, which was causing problems rather than fixing them. Maybe my settings were wrong, but I didn't end up needing it. I used 3 partitions for Ubuntu: (1) 1GB for /boot/efi (2) 8GB swap (I have 8GB of memory) (3) root, mounted at / A Ubuntu menu item magically ...


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You've got two disks: /dev/sda is an MBR disk that holds Windows and has the Windows BIOS boot loader in the MBR. /dev/sdb is a GPT disk with an EFI System Partition (ESP). The ESP holds both GRUB and the Windows EFI boot loader, and the MBR holds the first-stage GRUB BIOS boot loader. Note that you've got both BIOS and EFI boot loaders for both Windows ...


1

The easiest way to create USB Live CD with persistence is to manually form the partitions using GParted. This is what I've done: Format your USB with GPT partition table (though, I believe MBR should work fine as well). Create two partitions. First is for ISO files and it should be FAT32 (~1100MB for Ubuntu 14.04). Second is for persistence and it should ...


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First, let's clear up a terminology issue that may be leading you astray (although it's unlikely to be the cause of your main problem). You wrote: My guess is that this means the fact that the live environment was booted in BIOS mode makes it impossible for a new kernel to be loaded and interact with the GPT, despite if the kernel supports it, and that ...


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I got Ubuntu to boot without much effort. Make a bootable usb stick of Ubuntu 14.10. Use Rufus(Windows) or Startup Disk Creator(Ubuntu). Copy this file (bootia32.efi) to /EFI/BOOT directory on the usb stick. Turn Secure Boot off in the BIOS. Boot from the usb stick. This should boot Ubuntu 14.10 without any other issues. For further info check this ...


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Edit the boot order in your BIOS settings (press F2 during boot) and put the Windows Boot Manager in the top of the list.


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Boot into an Ubuntu Live CD/USB and open a terminal. Run sudo mount -t vfat -o iocharset-utf8,umask=000 /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1. You'll need to run sudo mkdir /mnt/sda1 first. Once it's mounted, browse the EFI drive in Nautilus and delete every folder called "Ubuntu".


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The "unknown" value under "File System" for partitions 2-8 and 10 indicates that GParted couldn't recognize the filesystem(s) used on those partitions. The values under the "Name" column in your parted -l output indicates that these partitions probably have highly specialized purposes, so there's not much point in even trying to access them from Ubuntu; it ...


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Why use external stuff at all, the machines themselves got hdd's I guess? The best would be to configure e.g. Clonezilla server and prepare some iso's and every time you have a course, install this isos on the harddisc over the network. One week later there is a windows class? No worries, choose the windows iso, boot them over network and install windows, ...


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Both your disks use the GUID Partition Table (GPT), which means that Windows is booting in EFI/UEFI mode. This is your starting point for any repair, since this detail is not easily changed. The fact that Boot Repair once said you needed to create a BIOS Boot Partition (the "bios-grub flag" you mentioned) means that that boot of the system was in ...


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If the computer shipped with Windows 8 or 8.1 and has a Windows sticker on it, the contract between the manufacturer and Microsoft requires that you be able to disable Secure Boot. There's no requirement that you be able to do this in any particular way, so you may need to check your menus very carefully. The option might not even mention "Secure Boot" by ...


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For future reference, code samples should be entered with four spaces preceding each line. Using carats (>) at the start of the line is used for quoting content, and does not preserve critical code formatting. I've fixed your question so it's properly formatted. See here for more on formatting features on this site. As to your question, there are two ...


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Try this: Boot your Ubuntu installation disc, but select the "try before installing" option. Open a Terminal window. Verify that the /sys/firmware/efi directory is present. If not, reboot in EFI mode. (You were in EFI mode when you installed.) Type sudo efibootmgr -o 2,2002,1,3001. This command changes the boot order so that GRUB is first. (See lines ...


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Concerning speed to enter your firmware setup utility, try downloading the USB flash drive or CD-R version of my rEFInd boot manager. Prepare a medium and boot from it. With any luck, there'll be a menu option on the second row of icons to reboot into the firmware setup utility. (The icon is of a computer chip.) Try that option. If it takes less time, then ...


2

Here is a step by step on how I did it: 1. Install Windows 8.1 2. disable secureboot in bios (or in some cases allow it to run other Os's) 3. turn off fast boot 4. install ubuntu alongside windows.


-1

This means Ubuntu is not able to control the boot process. In order to get it right you need to mount the partition containing ubuntu using ubuntu Live CD and reinstall grub. Check the following link, it explains how to do this http://howtoubuntu.org/how-to-repair-restore-reinstall-grub-2-with-a-ubuntu-live-cd edited answer Following are the things you ...


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Resources http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295 You have got a Lenovo model try to find a post about.


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Chances are one of two things has happened (maybe both): You installed Ubuntu incorrectly, in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode when Windows was installed in EFI/UEFI mode. In almost all cases, it's best to install Ubuntu in the same mode as Windows. Doing otherwise can create symptoms like those you describe. There have been a number of recent questions about this, ...


0

Chances are you have RAID support enabled in your firmware and/or in Windows. It is imperative that your RAID settings be identical in the firmware and in all your OSes!!! If I'm right and you simply "fix" the problem in Ubuntu but leave RAID enabled in your firmware and/or in Windows, you could conceivably end up with data loss. Note that RAID can be active ...


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The_Seppi's response answers your first question and is absolutely correct in that respect. As to the question of fixing the problem, chances are that one of two things is happening: There may be something wrong with the filesystem (filesystem damage). This can happen if you use the Windows "fast startup" feature, which is set by default. It's imperative ...


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Oldfred's and ubfan1's suggestions are both worth heeding. Here's another option: Install my rEFInd boot manager. Unlike GRUB, it scans for boot loaders and Linux kernels every time it boots, so you don't have to worry about having every OS and every kernel in a configuration file. You can test rEFInd before installing it by using the CD-R or USB flash drive ...


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If you installed another UEFI boot with its efi boot files and you have the same version of grub, you can just edit the grub.cfg in the efi partition with the new UUID. Back up ESP - Efi System Partition before making any changes. You can just copy files back and it should work. Otherwise you have to run repairs to restore efi boot files. In your ...


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Open the file /etc/fstab in a text editor with elevated privileges. You should be able to recognise the EFI partition at once, as it will likely carry a label, such as this: # /boot/efi was on /dev/sda1 during installation UUID=xxxx-xxxx /boot/efi vfat defaults 0 1 In order to prevent automatical mounting, append the noauto flag to ...


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Fixing the backup GPT solved the issue. In order to fix it: run "sudo gparted", and click FIX when it reports the problem about the backup GPT and proposes to fix it).


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You dont need to install Ubuntu. Just make a live USB media using Linux Live USB Creator from Windows. Here is the guide. While creating USB use persistence. What is persistence? Usually, on a live CD or Live USB key, all modifications are discarded when you reboot. The persistence allows you to keep your preferences and data even after ...


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I have had this before and I would need more information about your system (partitions, grub etc) to tell you the exact way. Your problem is mostly likely that you didn't install Windows and Ubuntu in the correct order or installed GRUB not properly. But one of these should solve your problem. Boot from the right partition Go into your BIOS/UEFI and pick ...


0

In parted and GParted, an ESP is identified by a "boot flag," but there's no such thing as an "esf flag" in either program. Thus, it's unclear to me what you mean by that. Please check it and report the actual "flags" set. It's unlikely that this detail is directly related to your problem, but it might be. AFAIK, current versions of GRUB should recognize ...


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Windows ties its boot mode and partition table type together quite tightly: An MBR partition table may be used if and only if the computer boots in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode. A GUID Partition table (GPT) may be used if and only if the computer boots in EFI/UEFI mode. You currently have an MBR partition table. The error message you report indicates that you ...


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First, you say your "BIOS is UEFI," but that's not true. You almost certainly have no BIOS; you have a UEFI. This may sound like splitting hairs, but it's not; referring to an EFI/UEFI as a "BIOS" drags in a lot of assumptions that simply do not apply in the EFI world. ("UEFI" is essentially version 2.x of EFI, so I generally use "EFI," as it's the more ...


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Option 1 is most probably possible, depending on your BIOS's implementation of UEFI. GRUB can (and should, if your install disk was booted in UEFI mode or you installed the UEFI bootloader afterwards) install itself onto your EFI partition, and will not overwrite the Windows boot loader. You can then choose to boot (using your UEFI BIOS's boot menu) with ...


0

Reboot your PC and go to the bios, find the option legacy BIOS-compatibility or something like that, (If you add what manufacture and version to the question, I can add more detail here), turn it on, reboot to Widows installer, reformat the NTFS partition (NTFS again) and it should install. Please note : This is instructions for installing Windows 8 to a ...


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I could solve this issue by changing the cdrom device within virtualbox from IDE to SATA. I removed the standard mapping of the virtual cdrom drive within the device configuration. Simply add a cdrom device to the existing SATA Controller which is to be used for your installation media. Et voila, no further problems with EFI.


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Judging from your grub.cfg file, it looks like you should be seeing three entries for Windows: Windows UEFI bootmgfw.efi Windows Boot UEFI loader Windows Boot Manager (on /dev/sdc1) Please clarify which of those you've tried, and what the result is for each of them. In some cases, one option will work but others won't, in which case the appropriate thing ...


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I recommend creating your boot disk with dd, as in: dd if=image.iso of=/dev/sdc Change image.iso to the filename you want to write and /dev/sdc to the device filename for your USB flash drive. Third-party disk-imaging tools might or might not create a disk image that's bootable in EFI mode. That said, some rare computers make it necessary to use such a ...


0

It's perfectly safe for Ubuntu to be installed on and run from that SSD. Linux don't need to stinkin' .exe files. ;-P If you want to know, whether a Windows installation (e. g. in a dual-boot environment) will be affected by the removal of that file, you should ask on SuperUser. The people here are really good at removing Windows and installing Ubuntu, but ...


2

It looks like the source computer, at least, used EFI. If the new computer also uses EFI, you should be able to use my rEFInd boot manager as an emergency boot system: Download the CD-R or USB flash drive version from the downloads page. Prepare a boot medium from said image. Boot rEFInd. This may require using your computer's built-in boot manager, ...


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Sorry to necro an old thread, but I added in a generic low end nvidia card into one of the slots and graphic mode worked. You just need to have a dual input capable monitor to see the boot option on the onboard vid and then switch to the 2nd vid card to use Ubuntu. I used this guide ...


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First, some terminology: A boot loader loads a kernel into memory and executes it. A boot manager presents a menu that lets you select which OS to boot. GRUB does both jobs for Linux, although it can't load a Windows kernel directly; to boot Windows, GRUB redirects to the Windows boot program. Likewise, the Windows boot program cannot directly load a ...


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If you want to install ubuntu in UEFI mode you can do that by following these steps. You need a Windows OS to write the USB. You have to burn iso image to your USB using a different software and then you can install it as usual, without turning UEFI or fastboot off. Just follow these simple steps Download Ubuntu 14.04, 14.10 or 15.04 Disk Image. Download ...


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All you have to do is remove manually the Ubuntu in UEFI menu. If there's not such option, you should contact the manufacturer. And there's no need to format the EFI partition, I recommend that you don't even try to do it because that's quite risky.


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First, it's unclear what you mean that you "dealt with UEFI." There's a LOT of misinformation floating around about EFI-mode booting, so a vague statement that you "dealt with" it could mean that you've followed appropriate advice or that you've followed any of the many (in fact, perhaps more numerous than correct) pages that present iffy or flat-out wrong ...


-1

How to get your laptop to boot the cd in bios mode is specific to your model of laptop: you will have to read the manual or contact the manufacturer about that. However, when installing Ubuntu along side an existing bios booting Windows install, it will automatically stick with bios booting even though the installer itself is booted in UEFI mode.


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On a Surface Pro, it is possible to circumvent Grub 2 by selecting the "Re-install secure boot keys" option from the UEFI menu.



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