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Chances are you've got two problems.... Mixed-mode install You wrote: I turned off Secure Boot in my BIOS and changed the mode from UEFI to LEGACY mode A lot of pages recommend disabling EFI/UEFI mode and enabling BIOS/CSM/legacy support, but it's BAD ADVICE. The problem is that your computer with Windows 8 pre-installed boots Windows in EFI/UEFI ...


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Burn Ubuntu Live USB / DVD (You can do it via Unetbootin). Boot the machine in Live Ubuntu environment. Open up terminal and type sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair; \ sudo apt-get update; \ sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair Once the boot-repair window pops up , click on recommended repair. Reboot. This might ...


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You don't need to reinstall grub because it will not be deleted. What could happen is that the NVRAM entry in the EFI/BIOS pointing to grub could be deleted. So you will certainly need to recreate it after the BIOS upgrade. For that boot into a Live CD/USB, and run a command like sudo apt-get install efibootmgr sudo efibootmgr -c -L Grub -l ...


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The fact that somebody's asking $400 to fix a blue-screen problem in Windows suggests the possibility that the computer has a hardware fault. That's far from certain, though (you haven't said how much diagnosis went into this repair estimate). If I had to guess, I'd say you might have a damaged hard disk. You can check this by running a SMART test, as ...


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You can install Ubuntu as a single system. It must not be hard. Use a 64-bit Ubuntu release. Boot from liveCD, start gparted and create partitions you need. If you disable EFI, it won't affect performance, but the system may boot a little bit slower. EFI partition should be not less that 50 MB and formatted to fat32. In most cases there is no need to make ...


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Windows is doing something weird. I wiped all references to Windows from /sys/firmware/efi and it still popped up to Windows boot repair. I ended up turning on secure boot which finally made it stop, but now I cant make Windows boot at all cause I cant fins a certificate


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First, your Windows installation, at least, is in EFI mode (aka UEFI mode; UEFI is just EFI 2.x), not in BIOS mode, as your question's title claims. That said, there is evidence of a BIOS-mode Linux boot loader, so you probably either installed Linux in BIOS mode initially or ran Boot Repair at least once in BIOS mode; but there's also evidence of an ...


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Is your external HDD set to bootable( has boot flag ) ? You can check it via command below as root(or use sudo): fdisk -l /dev/sdx Replace x with your HDD letter. Column Boot should be set for the linux root partition. If it is set to boot, check if grub is installed. You can install grub (on ubuntu) via command: sudo apt-get install grub-install ...


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You may find your answer here: https://github.com/lopaka/instructions/blob/master/ubuntu-14.10-install-asus-x205ta.md I am not sure how great of a Stack-appropriate "answer" this is (on my part), but I am wrestling with this exact problem with my x205t right now. And I think this might be our best bet. You apparently need to rewrite the GRUB loader ...


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I've had the same issue. Installed on multi monitors but disconnecting them after install and reconnecting them so they were redetected fixed the issue. I now have the issue again on install after messing up my earlier success by trying to update to 15.04. Back at the installer again. All is blurry. But changed monitors from a Benq which wants to run ...


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Solved: Resetted the BIOS by unplugging and removing battery and all got fixed somehow.


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Install reFind... http://sourceforge.net/projects/refind/ It handles and does all that for ya :P


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First of all, you do not need to disable "Secure Boot" to install Ubuntu any more. It looks like your computer is with bios, not UEFI, becuase it was natively with Windows 7. You do not need to do anything special to install in dual boot with Windows 8. Just do not forget to shut down Windows properly. It is hibernated by default. So just install Ubuntu ...


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I am assuming you are booting a PC in BIOS mode. When running the Live CD/USB, choose "Try ubuntu" Then run gparted and: create a GPT partition table (Device > Create partition table) on your pendrive create an ESP, fat32, 512MB, with esp flag. create also a BIOS boot partition, unformatted, 32Mb, with bios_grub flag Then click on install Ubuntu to ...


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Download your BIOS update program from your computer manufacturers website. You can try installing it with Wine in ubuntu but likely will not work (worth a try though). Chances are your computer does not have a bios chip but rather loads the bios from a specific hard disk. Same as holding SHIFT key immediately after (or even before) power on. Using the ...


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You could use xorriso. I don't remember why but I think this is not possible with mkisofs. Try: xorriso -as mkisofs \ -isohybrid-mbr /usr/lib/syslinux/mbr/isohdpfx.bin \ -c isolinux/boot.cat \ -b isolinux/isolinux.bin \ -no-emul-boot \ -boot-load-size 4 \ -boot-info-table \ -eltorito-alt-boot \ -e boot/grub/efi.img \ -no-emul-boot \ ...


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You wrote: Recently installed Ubuntu 14.04 along with windows 8.1 in my dell inspiron 15 5547 (Legacy Mode, windows 8.1 in uefi mode) Your parenthetical comment reveals the cause of the problem. Mixing BIOS/CSM/legacy mode and EFI/UEFI mode is a Bad Idea. On most computers, doing so makes it difficult to switch boot modes. Fortunately, the solution is ...


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Well My BIOS was really different i didt find the customized option, so i mounted the Efi partition and replaced windows EFI file with th Refind one and it seems to work, now computer Boots into Refind Main menuand i am able to pick systems it seems that did the trick now its working perfectly :D


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HP BIOSes are a bit weird, I've been struggling with that, too. Does your BIOS Setup look like this (found on newer HP ProBooks), then follow below instructions. This was the only way I managed to get Ubuntu to boot on my laptop with Secure Boot enabled. In the BIOS setup, under System Configuration → Boot Options, you should find the option ...


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So what else changed that would have messed up the udev rules? PCI address somehow? MAC? Would an EFI update have actually touched the NICs? (Perhaps if the onboards are also Intel NICs and it was more than just an EFI update...) but that's really a stretch. solsTiCe is right, the udev rule should have prevented that from happening.


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It looks like the kernel options passed via gummiboot are different from those passed via GRUB. In particular, the gummiboot configuration is probably missing a root={whatever} option (where {whatever} is a description of your root filesystem, such as a UUID or device filename). See the gummiboot web page for details about gummiboot configuration files.


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I can't speak to Rufus. My personal preference is to use dd to copy an image to a USB flash drive, since this results in a medium that usually boots fine in both BIOS/CSM/legacy mode and in EFI/UEFI mode. That said, some computers choke on such media, which employ something of a Frankenstein's Monster approach to their layout. In other words, there's no ...


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Ubuntu's live media will boot both in legacy and UEFI mode, and the install is done in whichever mode is booted. Some machines will not boot USB unless secure boot is disabled, but that does not mean you have to go to legacy mode. Try that. Also read: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI ...


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I had the same issue with my GTX 750 Ti. I was able to resolve it with the following steps: Add nomodeset to bootloader (How do I set 'nomodeset' after I've already installed Ubuntu?) Run the following commands in terminal: sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:xorg-edgers/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install nvidia-346 Restart computer ...


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You could have removed GRUB from your hard disk pretty easily, just by deleting some files. That ship has sailed, though.... The easiest way to do what you want is: Start the Ubuntu installation media, but select the option to try Ubuntu without installing rather than the option to install Ubuntu. Launch a Terminal window. Type ubiquity -b or ubiquity ...


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your pc not compatible with linux http://www.dell.com/br/empresa/p/optiplex-9020-desktop/pd try other distribution, samble: OpenSuse Suse compuny belongs the Microsoft, due to this great compatibility hardware exclusive windows Platform. att


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I had this problem after installing Ubuntu 14.04 alongside windows 8.1 on my nice new lenovo thinkpad t540p laptop. However, all I had to do was disable the secure boot option in the bios. Having done that, the grub menu allows me to boot either Ubuntu or Windows from the options. I did not need to do anything else.


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First, your teacher was wrong in saying you can't have two EFI-based OSes on a single hard disk; there's no problem with such a configuration. In fact, once you understand the rules and the quirks of your particular computer, it's generally easier to install more OSes on an EFI-based computer than on a BIOS-based one. Those two caveats are important, though; ...


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Boot with Ubuntu Live USB. Install Ubuntu somewhere. Boot with Ubuntu, open Terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) and run the command sudo update-grub Now restart your PC. You should see both Windows and Ubuntu options at GRUB boot menu. That's all the help I can provide with the information you gave, hope it helps!


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rEFInd is designed to automatically remove certain redundant entries. One of these redundancies is shimx64.efi, if grubx64.efi is also present. Thus, your statement that "[i]t should be grub64.efi and shim64.efi" is not correct, unless you created a manual boot stanza for one or both of these files. In your case, you've got three entries: grubx64.efi -- ...


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The answer is given in the description of the boot entries: 3.13.0.32-generic vs. 3.13.0.52-generic, i.e. the latter one will boot a more recent kernel. This is due to Ubuntu's (other Distros do this, too) practice of keeping older kernel images when a new one is installed, so you can easily revert if the update doesn't work as intended or refuses to boot ...


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First, you need to be aware that there are two methods of booting most modern computers: BIOS/CSM/legacy mode -- This mode is what was used on most computers prior to about 2011. It uses either an old-style BIOS firmware or BIOS emulation ("CSM" or "legacy") on a more modern firmware. It's usually paired with an MBR partition table. Note that on a modern ...


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I have four suggestions, off the top of my head: Try another Shim -- I've found that some EFIs are a bit flaky about loading certain signed binaries, and will reject some signed binaries that other EFIs accept. Unfortunately, this quirk affects some copies of Shim, so you may just need to try another Shim binary. Using the one that's working for Ubuntu is ...


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This page on the Asus website says that your motherboard support Ubuntu 12.04.


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In my experience, GRUB can be very difficult to repair once things go "off the rails." You might want to consider using one of the several EFI-based alternatives instead. Most of them require at least some manual configuration, but that's likely to be easier than fixing GRUB. My own rEFInd requires no ongoing maintenance, so if it works initially, it should ...


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With in the bios there is a system switch that force overides windows to boot. I had the same problem on two different machines that came 'stock out of the box' with Windows 8, when I purchased them. I do not dual boot I memory wiped, then installed Ubuntu. None the less, the option you are looking for to boot Ubuntu in the bios is to boot 'Legacy OS'. No ...


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I'd first like to reiterate what kos wrote: The Ubuntu installer installs Ubuntu in the mode in which it was booted. You as a user have no choice on the matter once the installer has booted. Your only choice in the matter comes before that point, when you boot the medium. Unfortunately, how to force the medium to boot in a particular mode varies from one ...


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It's possible to resize partitions in such a way that data are not lost, although the amount of free space on the resized partition(s) will change. New partitions for Ubuntu can then be created in the space "vacated" by the resized partition(s). The Ubuntu installer can do this automatically or semi-automatically in some cases. BEWARE, THOUGH! There are ...


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The fact that GRUB starts, and can start Windows, means that GRUB is starting in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode. GRUB cannot switch boot modes (BIOS to EFI or EFI to BIOS), so GRUB must be trying to start Linux in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode, too. In other words, EFI support is not your issue. If you try messing with those settings in the firmware, or make EFI-related ...


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Ubuntu automatically detects whether a machine has been booted in legacy mode or in UEFI mode and chooses the installation type based on that. So the installation type is determined based on how the installer has been booted. So this is really dependant on the UEFI settings rather than on how Ubuntu is designed.


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You should allocate a separate partition for Ubuntu if you are planning to dual-boot with windows. If you choose so, make sure that you have moved all data from these partition(s) to some other partition because installing Ubuntu will format this partition and you will lose data if you put anything here. In addition, installing Ubuntu alongside windows like ...


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Well, Ubuntu's live media does boot and install in UEFI mode when the machine is in UEFI mode. The problem is each vendor seems to put their own non-UEFI standard tweaks into the UEFI boot process, so each machine has it unique set of issues when installing in UEFI mode. When Windows 8.1 is installed in UEFI mode, that is the necessary condition to use ...


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Note: As of right now, Ubuntu 15.04 will BOOT on a bay trail tablet, but it will not install correctly. My guide is based mostly on this one, but with minor adjustments, and easier to follow instructions. This guide is tested and working on the Winbook Tw100 Windows 8 tablet (by Microcenter). You may require: USB OTG (on the go) cable, for connecting the ...


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You shouldn't have any problems. GRUB has an EFI version, and should set itself as default during the install. What you need to do, however, is boot the installation in EFI mode and not just selecting it in the boot menu. If your BIOS can select to boot from an EFI file, you need to go into the drive and select the grubx64.efi file somewhere under EFI.


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Your installation is very strange: Your partition table is MBR, which almost always indicates a BIOS-mode boot. In the case of Windows, MBR requires a BIOS-mode boot. You've got the Windows boot loader installed in the MBR. Your first partition has a FAT filesystem and contains EFI boot loaders, apparently for both Linux and Windows (although the Windows ...


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The EFI specification specifically states that there are no limits on this detail: UEFI does not impose a restriction on the number or location of System Partitions that can exist on a system. (Version 2.5, p. 540.) As a practical matter, putting the ESP first is advisable because this location is unlikely to be impacted by partition moving and ...


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Try using EasyUEFI in Windows. It's a GUI tool for managing EFI boot loaders, and it should enable you to set Windows as the default boot option. If you wanted to do the same thing in Ubuntu, you'd use the efibootmgr program: Type sudo efibootmgr to see the options, then use the -o option to set the boot order as desired.


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The key words "SHOULD", "MUST" and "MAY" (capitalised) in this answer are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119. An (U)EFI System Partition (ESP from now on), MAY reside at the beginning of the disk, and SHOULD be FAT32 because of Windows compatibility. The only official limit is: the ESP MUST reside in the first 2.2 Terabytes of the disk. So, the ...


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The solution was to remove the Ubuntu folder from the efi partition.


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Pretty much. EFI-mode booting involves two things: Boot loader files written to the EFI System Partition (ESP) on the hard disk. Pointers to the ESP-based files stored in NVRAM on the motherboard. The intent is that you can install as many boot loaders as you like and provide an order in which the computer should try them. Users should also be able to ...



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