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Yes $ ls /dev/input/mou* /dev/input/mouse0 /dev/input/mouse1 /dev/input/mouse2 $ ls /dev/dri/card* /dev/dri/card0 $ ls /dev/video* /dev/video0 $ ls /dev/sd* /dev/sg* /dev/hd* /dev/sda /dev/sda1 /dev/sda2 /dev/sda3 /dev/sda5 /dev/sda6 /dev/sg0 /dev/sg1 Why? See these related questions Why do Ethernet devices not show up in “/dev”? Why are ...


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Looking in web for similar device point me that your device is 1d57:83ed Xenta and it create two input devices (a mouse and a keyboard) labeled as RF 2.4G RF 2.4G with id=14 & id=13 from your commands output. getscancodes was already created in ~/Downloads/getscancodes folder but /dev/input/event16 is not the corresponding event device file. You can ...


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RUN could be used only for short tasks. RUN{type} ... This can only be used for very short-running foreground tasks. Running an event process for a long period of time may block all further events for this or a dependent device. Starting daemons or other long running processes is not appropriate for udev; the forked ...


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The missing header file is part of more than one package. Check this first (you have 64-bit) sudo apt-get install libc6-dev-amd64 or for 32-bit (for later readers with 32-bit systems) sudo apt-get install libc6-dev-i386 Have a look at the packages with this header file here.


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I am attempting to answer only one part : "Where does eth3 & eth4 came from ?. Going by one of my experience, the mac addresses pointing to the names eth0,eth1, eth2 would have been become redundant by a mother board/network card replacement in the machine. So if this caused by a network interface going away from the machine, you can safely delete ...



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