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12

I believe in teaching people to fish so why don't you visit http://likho.canonical.com/? Port 80 is habitually web traffic so that's why I'm suggesting opening it in your browser. You'll quickly see that likho.canonical.com is a repository. It's probably just a load-balancing thing (a round-robin A record to be precise) for the archive.ubuntu.com address. ...


8

I personally use vnstat which works quite nicely as it just sits in the background. You can query it for hourly, daily, monthy stats and there's a nice web based frontend to it called jvnstat. Here's some examples from my website:- alan@bishop:~$ vnstat -m eth0 / monthly month rx | tx | total | avg. rate ...


5

Set up eth0 as the default route, set up an alternate route through wlan0, and configure the ssh traffic to go through the alternate route. Install the iproute package to manipulate routing tables through the ip command. Mark the outgoing packets that you want to re-route, and set up a routing rule to route those packets through a different interface. ...


5

You can use System monitor to see the traffic used in a single session. Use gnome-system-monitor to open it in a terminal. You a totalistic view of usage, you can use ipac-ng. Install it with the command sudo apt-get install ipac-ng Here is a good guide about usage of this software. Alternatively, You can also use vnstat. Install it wit the command: ...


4

ntop is a classic Install sudo apt-get install ntop You will be asked to set a password during the install point firefox to http://localhost:3000 or https://localhost:3001 log in with the username admin and the password you set. notp will show you all sorts of information. Small sample:


4

Zentyal, formerly eBox looks like a good option, It is a small business server system with gateway firewall and traffic shaping capabilities. What I am not sure of is if it can report offending users but you can test it for yourself. The homepage is here: http://www.zentyal.org/ Network configuration documentation is here: ...


4

Leaving the Linux kernel aside and concentrating on the Canonical side , answering to your questions in order: Your clean, fresh install of Ubuntu is indeed "phoning home" to Canonical (the company behind Ubuntu) to multiple servers (E.g. canonical.com, ubuntu.com, ...) for a variety of reasons without user interaction on start-up and on shut down to ...


3

I would recommend using ntop for getting a basic,long term overview of network conversations. You can install this by running the following command: sudo apt-get install ntop Once installed, go to http://localhost:3000/ to view the traffic conversations to determine what is talking with your machine. If you really want to dive down into the details ...


3

If you do this on the sly your best option is to use Wireshark. This program can scan every packet on your network and then you filter the results on the HTTP protocol. sudo apt-get install wireshark That installs the program. As its a very popular program you will find many guides on the internet using this program. Look at this for an example ...


3

Just keep the nethogs running. You can change display modes by pressing M. The first default mode is kbps, after pressing M few times you can get total bytes. Edit: added screenshots


3

The simplest method You can use ifconfig on you network interface (mine is eth0) - it counts the amount of data sent and received since the interface was started. # Bytes Receive ifconfig eth0 | awk '/RX bytes/ {print $2}' | awk -F: '{print $2}' # Bytes Transmitted ifconfig eth0 | awk '/RX bytes/ {print $6}' | awk -F: '{print $2}' # A human readable ...


3

Network analyser tools: I suggest you to install wireshark and read its documentation.


2

I use nethogs ; it tells me the current usage and the processes: NetHogs is a small 'net top' tool. Instead of breaking the traffic down per protocol or per subnet, like most tools do, it groups bandwidth by process. NetHogs does not rely on a special kernel module to be loaded. Homepage: http://nethogs.sourceforge.net/ It is available in the ...


2

Consider wireshark sudo apt-get install wireshark This should help you sniff out any traffic originating from your android emulator to http https based on a variety of filter criteria.


2

I suggest you to install iptraf commandline tool.


2

It's somewhat complex. You will need to create an alternative route table, use iptables to mark the package and add a routing rule to force the kernel to use the alternate routing table when the package is marked. You have a good tutorial for a somewhat more complex setup here.


2

GOT IT! Or at least, for now, I think I have the answer (thanks to the Q&A and research noted below). I now have a computer that does not reach out to the Internet until I ask it to do so (we will see how periodic auto updates do [which I am ok with])... ahh finally the soothing tranquil sound of an Internet quiet machine at boot/start and shut down ...


2

You can use wireshark to sniff network traffic and analyze all exchanges made by your ubuntu box. Here is my results made by installing Ubuntu 14.04 in virtualbox (for easier traffic sniffing): On boot: DHCP Request, Offer, ACK various MDNS query/response to 224.0.0.251 DNS query for ntp.ubuntu.com then NTP traffic to ntp.ubuntu.com DNS query for ...


1

Install vnstat by running this in a terminal: sudo apt-get install vnstat Once installed, run vnstat in a terminal to show your internet usage. Example output: rx / tx / total / estimated eth0: Jun '13 14.40 GiB / 1.70 GiB / 16.10 GiB Jul '13 3.57 GiB / 2.55 GiB / 6.12 GiB / ...


1

I can't say for sure. But what you're limiting is the actual file transfer. I'd guess that Transmission would still update the trackers at a regular interval. That shouldn't be too much data, but if you have many active torrents, it'll grow. Perhaps it keeps updating the list of peers as well.


1

Maybe the nethogs is useful for you. the output is: install with: sudo apt-get install nethogs


1

Go to system settings and there should be security and privacy option. Tap on it and turn the privacy mode on. should solve your querys for your first answer yes its does send information to canonical but if you turn the privacy on that should do the trick no more sending data They mostly do it for seeing what type of software you use.


1

If all you want is to block Torrents, then I suggest that you use UFW. Its Ubuntu default Firewall. To make it easier, you can install the UFW GUI, GUFW. To enable the GUI, just press Ctrl+Alt+T on your keyboard to open Terminal. When it opens, run the command(s) below: sudo apt-get install Once done, search for firewall in dash, when it opens, click ...


1

Use wireshark or command line tool tshark. tcpdump is another option. sudo apt-get install tcpdump tcpdump -i $interface


1

No, the kernel versions available in the official Ubuntu 12.04 repositories are: 3.2.0, provided by package linux-generic 3.5.0, provided by package linux-generic-lts-quantal 3.8.0, provided by package linux-generic-lts-raring If you manage to install any kernel from a not official repository, it would be unsupported.


1

first of all you need to check your firewall status: ufw status than before you turn it on, probably you want to block all ports, all connections, just, everithing, and then to unblock what you need. ufw default deny then you add your rules, example: ufw allow from 111.222.111.222 to 80 but if you have more than one computer, you need for every same ...


1

Have you tried this: How can I remove Amazon search results from the dash? sudo apt-get remove unity-lens-shopping


1

That is a question requiring a very nontrivial answer. The following tools could all be useful to deflect an attack: nmap -A netstat -lnptu kill the /proc filesystem iptables the sentry tools suite These tools give you a lot of control if you know how to use them and will require some good "hobby time" to learn.



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