Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

You need to configure the date/time applet. sudo dpkg-reconfigure --frontend noninteractive tzdata And then get Unity to reload it. sudo killall unity-panel-service


0

For most hardware the lifetime is discussed as the meant time before failure (MTBF). However, for CPUs and GPUs this number is rarely every discussed. Generally CPUs in home machines do not continuously have a high load for days on end. This load produces heat which can cause damage from atom migration. So this is a real issue if you say plan to run physics ...


0

There is absolutely no way to quantify this question. There are multiple reasons why hardware might fail. I've seen hardware last over 30 years and I've seen hardware fail after two days.


0

The 5:30 GMT line passes close to kolkata, not New Delhi. That's why Ubuntu shows it at kolkata. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Standard_Time


2

The date/time indicator applet has either been accidentally removed or is not configured. Start by trying to re-install it. (If you already have it, then you can ignore the message saying the latest version is already installed). sudo apt-get install indicator-datetime Now configure it. sudo dpkg-reconfigure --frontend noninteractive tzdata And ...


0

try using this cli pkill -f indicator-datetime-service clock will appear directly. credit : @Sneetsher


0

The system clock gets set to either UTC or Local based on the last option used when the hwclock function was run. If you run: hwclock -w --localtime This should write your system clock to local time instead of UTC and should subsequently set it and read it at boot using local time. If you manually set your system clock and the hwclock was last specified ...


0

If it is always exactly 5 hours ahead it sounds like a timezone issue. In which case, it's likely that your hardware clock is set to local time, while the Linux system time is always set to UTC. If your timezone is 5 hours off of UTC, that would be the 5 hours. In which case, in addition to the "--systohc" options for "hwclock" you should look into the ...


0

There is a file that controls system timezone.. I just got the same issue, here is the solution: If you haven't configure manually any timezone, performing "date" should display UTC time. create a backup sudo cp /etc/localtime /etc/localtime.bkp remove the file: sudo rm /etc/localtime I live in Chicago, (you may need to change the path, using tab ...



Top 50 recent answers are included