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Install the network time protocol daemon. This will allow you to sync your system time over the internet. sudo apt install ntp ntpdate Once installed, run the following command: ntpdate pool.ntp.org This will link your computer with the time servers of the NTP Pool Project. For me my clocks fixed themselves quickly after running the command. And that ...


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Install ntp and ntpdate executing the following commands- sudo apt-get install ntp sudo apt-get install ntpdate Then, execute sudo ntpdate ntp.ubuntu.com This works for me.


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If you have Kubuntu (Plasma Desktop Ubuntu distro), you have a built-in widget called "fuzzy clock" -- it's been around at least since 14.04, or as long ago as Plasma 4 has been out, and it's still in Plasma 5 as found in Kubuntu 16.04. Fuzzy Clock can be set to be as "accurate" as five minute increments, like reading an analog clock (say, "ten after ...


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click on system settings. Click on Language Support. Click on the Regional Formats Tab, and change language to English, and apply system- wide. and that will do it. Note: You may have to reboot, so changes can take effect


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It's easy to change language in Ubuntu, First of all Go to System Settings, then to Language Support. From there open the second tab which is named "Regional Formats". Then change the drop down bar's content from "Arabic" to the English language variant you like and you're all set. Re-login for this to take effect


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Check this for details about setting up NTP synchronization. UbuntuTime From the above page: Command Line ntpdate Ubuntu comes with ntpdate as standard, and will run it once at boot time to set up your time according to Ubuntu's NTP server. However, a system's clock is likely to drift considerably between reboots if the time between reboots is long. In ...


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Answered by utamav: This is a common problem when dual booting with Ubuntu/Linux. Linux gets it's time from BIOS assuming it is UTC while Windows does it assuming it is your regional time. So each OS keeps messing the time for each other. The easier way is to change time in Linux. In linux, go to: /etc/default/rcS Change: UTC=yes to UTC=no


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It seems to be a conflict with ntpdate being on the machine as well. If you ONLY install ntp but not ntpdate, then ntp is allowed to work. With both on the machine, ntp won't stay up on next reboot. Seems related to this bug.


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Not sure if this is a bug with 16.04. I had the same problem and simply installing ntp helped. sudo apt install ntp After a reboot timedatectl showed ntp sync enabled.


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64-bit Linux is ready. The situation for 32-bit Linux (and the compatibility layer for 32-bit binaries on 64-bit Linux) is much less rosy. It's broken and fixing it without breaking all existing binaries is not an easy task. Even if there is some level of backwards compatibility all binaries that want to get correct time will need to be rebuilt to use the ...


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As @muru explained on Clock time is off on dual boot and according to the Arch Wiki: You can set the hardware clock time standard through the command line. You can check what you have set to use by: $ timedatectl | grep local The hardware clock can be queried and set with the timedatectl command. To change the hardware clock time standard to ...



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