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33

Reference: http://www.maketecheasier.com/date-time-missing-ubuntu-1310/ 01) Reinstall indicator-datetime. It should be installed by default, but just in case you have removed it unknowingly, it is best to run the install command again. sudo apt-get install indicator-datetime 02) Next, we are going to reconfigure the date time: sudo ...


32

Any idea how I change from IST to GMT? To switch to UTC, simply execute sudo dpkg-reconfigure tzdata, scroll to the bottom of the Continents list and select Etc; in the second list, select UTC. If you prefer GMT instead of UTC, it's just above UTC in that list. :)


23

As a regular user run this in a terminal when using gnome-shell: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.interface clock-show-date true For 11.10, use this instead: gsettings set org.gnome.shell.clock show-date true Hope this is what you're looking for!


20

Because of the way the two operating systems set the hardware clock. by Default ubuntu uses UTC, and windows localtime. So when you shut down, your hard ware clock is set to say "13:00". When you boot, windows sees "13:00" as localtime, so 1 PM, but Ubuntu sees that as UTC and so converts the time back from UTC to local time. You can fix this by either ...


14

I don't know of a single file, but this may give you the info needed: cat /etc/timezone grep UTC /etc/default/rcS date # hardware clock sudo hwclock --show


13

After mucking around for most of the day, I have come to the following conclusion: ntpdate-debian is the version to use if you want to use a config script, and in that case, you would edit the /etc/default/ntupdate file. ntpdate cannot be used without arguments nor does it have a config file. If you want to use this to update, you have to state the ntp ...


12

sudo dpkg-reconfigure tzdata then go to Etc, there to UTC, enter, you're done. It actually changes files /etc/timezone and /etc/localtime.


12

The normal way : Go to System -> Administration -> Language Support On the Text Tab, choose your prefered language to display numbers, dates, ... The advanced way for your Desktop Applet : Press Alt+F2 Type: gconf-editor & Hit return Navigate to “Apps > Panel > Applets > Clock_Screen0 > Prefs” Double-click on the ‘Format’ value. Change it to ...


12

It is happening to me sometimes, the solution is: sudo restart lightdm WARNING: This will logout all users immediately, possibly losing data.


11

As mentioned in another answer, if you are running Ubuntu as a Guest under VirtualBox then you should be aware that the system time is automatically kept in sync by the Guest Additions (i.e., not through an option in the motherboard settings). Your solution in that case is to disable the Guest Additions, which can be achieved by executing sudo service ...


11

Yes, run this command in a Terminal: gsettings set org.gnome.shell.clock show-seconds true And you can verify with: gsettings get org.gnome.shell.clock show-seconds Or you can install dconf-tools and use dconf-editor to browse to org.gnome.shell.clock


10

Sounds like you have a timezone issue. The easiest way to fix this is to reconfigure the tzdata package sudo dpkg-reconfigure tzdata There are alternative ways, like symlinking the correct zonefile from /usr/share/zoneinfo to /etc/localtime which will inform the system of the proper time: ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/New_York /etc/localtime ...


10

I don't think you can achieve exactly the same effect without modifying the bash source. But you can get close, hopefully close enough for you. You can combine bash's hacky precommand hook and the SECONDS variable to show the wall clock time in a non-intrusive way. Here's a simple implementation due to Ville Laurikari. The functions timer_start and ...


10

Your hosting provider is blocking ntp packets. This heavy handed approach has been implemented by some ISPs in response to the DDoS attacks. You can see that ntpdate is sending the packets fron the ntpdate -vd : transmit(91.189.94.4) transmit(91.189.89.199) transmit(91.189.94.4) transmit(91.189.89.199) I would contact your ISP and ask if they are blocking ...


9

ntpdate is deprecated as of September 2012; apparently ntpd now has the ability to do one-time updates if needed, and ntpdate is based on "long-neglected" ntpd code. (News to me, since my system has ntpdate but not ntpd! I'll be fixing that presently; thanks for asking this question.) As for the difference between continuous versus periodic updates, I think ...


9

Unable to find UTC or GMT in the menu, I ended up running tzselect from the command prompt. I selected 11, enter posix standard time, then entered UTC-0. This appears to have done it. thanks for all of the help.


8

Edit the file /etc/default/rcS with your favorite text editor, ie: sudo nano /etc/default/rcS Look for the UTC=foo (yes/no) line and change it to UTC=yes. From the rcS(5) man page: UTC This is used to govern how the hardware real time clock is interpreted when it is read (e.g., at boot time, for the purpose of setting the system clock) and ...


8

If you want to change the time format to German , you must install the German language from the Language Support and then set the "Regional Settings" in German If you want to change the format in Date and Time , you must install dconf-tool . From terminal do sudo apt-get install dconf-tools Find it through Dash by writing dconf open it and goto Com ...


8

Try: sudo ntpdate ntp.ubuntu.com Yes it would certainly mess with the SSL certs because they would be future-dated. It doubt it's a bug in Ubuntu, your CMOS clock in the BIOS must have been set to that somehow.


8

If you install the tzdata source package, you will find all your answers: sudo apt-get install apt-src mkdir tzdata && cd tzdata apt-src install tzdata Specifically: posix and right: Two different versions are provided: - The "posix" version is based on the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). - The "right" version is based on the ...


8

I'd switch to a virtual terminal at the GDM login screen (Ctrl+Alt+F1), log in and start iotop (you maybe need to install it first). Then switch back to GDM (Ctrl+Alt+F7), log in, and immediately switch back to iotop using Ctrl+Alt+F1. You should now see, which process is responsible for the heavy IO. Forgot to mention an alternative: you could try using ...


8

Maybe you should try changing your motherboard's battery. It's a possible cause.


8

Give a try to uptime command, $ uptime -s 2014-06-17 09:36:38 OR $ uptime -p up 10 hours, 12 minutes From uptime --help -p, --pretty show uptime in pretty format -s, --since system up since From man uptime, uptime gives a one line display of the following information. The cur‐ rent time, how long the system has been running, how many ...


7

You'll have to do some manual editing using nano, or your editor of choice: sudo nano /etc/default/ntpdate and change the NTPSERVERS="ntp.[your-server-here]" If you restart your computer this change will be made active. If you're feeling impatient and don't want to wait for the server to automatically update you can do it manually: sudo ntpdate-debian ...


7

Ok, solved it: 1) Make sure you have the locale you need, can't say which you specifically need but when you know you create it like this (using en_DK.utf8) sudo locale-gen en_DK.utf8 2) To make sure this locale is in effect for thunderbird you add it to the script that starts thunderbird, so first find that script: 2a) find the right script which ...


7

The clock loosing time is most likely to be caused by a fault CMOS battery. You can work around it by running ntp. You can do this easily via the clock. Click on the clock and choose the bottom option of "Time & Date Settings..." You have to "unlock to change these settings" and enter your password. Near the bottom, where it says "Set the time", ...


7

This is because time is a bash builtin command - and the builtin doesn't support the options you're trying to use. Try this, use the full path of time to skip the built-in and use the real one: /usr/bin/time -f "%E" ls -l


6

Click on the clock, and then select time and date settings, and then select "Manually" You can also ensure the ntp package is not installed (clicking on the button will show if you if you have it installed or not:


6

You can set the hardware clock with the command (for example) sudo hwclock --set --date="2012-12-15 20:49:00" You then need to syncronise the system clock to the hardware clock: sudo hwclock -s Reference: $ man hwclock


6

It's simple .... Edit /etc/php5/apache2/php.ini this file which is used for PHP configuration by Apache & add below line in it. This is the right php.info path for the Apache web server, otherwise use the respective web-server's folder in the /etc/php5/ location. List of supported timezone in PHP click here. date.timezone = "Asia/Kolkata" ...



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