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I think that the right way to do this is to create a Desktop Launcher for your alternative editor, and then modify the MIME database to associate it as the default application for your target mimetype(s). For example: Create a minimal $HOME/.local/share/applications/myedit.desktop as [Desktop Entry] Type=Application Exec=/usr/bin/nano %F Terminal=true ...


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Short answer: I hope I am wrong, but this is likely impossible or prohibitively difficult. The general answer is you would want to set your terminal as the default App in the GUI, with some some arguments to it. In my experience, Terminals tend not to support "run this application" as an argument and last time I did something like this I had a launcher set ...


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For your general informations, now there is subtitle-index.org, it concentrates a lot of subtitles, rank them along multiple criterias (duration, spell check, lisibility, encoding), and offers the best one in direct download as UTF-8. Working pretty fine, it avoids encoding problems which are pretty commons and annoying.


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It's not entirely clear to me what you really want to achieve If you want to encrypt the whole file with vim, you can simply run vim -x myfile.txt and vim will ask you for a passphrase to encrypt your file. On next opening of the file, you don't even need to use -x as vim will find out that it is encrypted and will ask you for the passphrase. If you want ...


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This is a matter of resource usage that generates the heat. As alluded to in comments, PhpStorm takes a lot of resources and CPU usage. This in turn means your CPU needs to run and generate heat to process the requirements. This is a side effect of resource-intense programs, and unfortunately there's no good solutions to this problem. (Windows is plagued ...


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I use Tomboy (available for the Software Centre). It is primarily meant as a quick note taking / note store programme, but also creates automatic links between notes and they can be organised in notebooks. Tomboy integrates tightly with Ubuntu, creating its own dash widget and making available a set of hot-keys for fast keyboard management. Tomboy ...


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Use a desktop wiki, e.g. Zim: sudo apt-get install zim You can export human readable text files, for example, if you using "markdown" as export format. Alternatively, you can export as HTML (via GUI or terminal) and convert into text with html2text. e.g.: zim --export --output=./html --format=html ~/<your_notebooks_path> find ./html -type f ...


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Libreoffice calc and most other spreadsheet software can save and read .csv files which can be saved as a .txt and can be opened in any text editor. From the Wikipedia page on CSV files: A comma-separated values (CSV) (also sometimes called character-separated values) file stores tabular data (numbers and text) in plain-text form. Plain text means that ...


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i would recommend a database like mysql for storing structured information. It's a little bit more work at the beginning, but for future use, i think, you'll be really glad ;) For viewing/editing you could use something like phpmyadmin or HeidiSQL (Windows). Regards Jonas



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