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2

Your issue seems to be that you are not in the same folder as the file tor-browser-linux32-5.5.5_LANG.tar.xz, so the file is not found, as you don't say where you downloaded the file, I can't tell you how to get to it but if it is in your /home/downloads run cd ~/Downloads then tar -xvJf tor-browser-linux32-5.5.5_LANG.tar.xz to extract it, and keep ...


1

You are trying to decompress/'unzip' (the -z option) but the tar is not compressed/'zipped' just use tar -xf name-of-tar or if you want more communication tar -xfvw name-of-tar (type man tar for more info)


0

I'd use the solution in Rinzwind's answer. There's no real reason to avoid the cd; especially if you put this in a shell script, as the cd will affect just the script, not the shell you call the script from. If you really really don't wan't to use cd, you can use tars --transform option: gbl@roran:~$ tar -cf /tmp/archive.tar /home/gbl/Temp/a.out ...


4

Drop the "/home/prj/myfolder/*" and use "cd /home/prj/myfolder/" to navigate to that location. cd /home/prj/myfolder/ find . -mtime 1 -type f | while read file; do tar -Pcvzf archive.tar.gz --remove-files "$file" done The files will then be stored with a relative path.


1

Yes you're doing it wrong. First of all, tar.gz is simply a compressed archive. Think of it as a zip file. There is no guarantee that it will have a configuration script. That said, the default name for the configuration script is configure, not config. So, the standard operating procedure to install from a source tarball is: tar xvzf foo.tzr.gz cd foo ...


0

the installation will fail if you just convert the package to deb... it's not so hard. you download it, extract it and inside that folder you open a terminal and do what we all do: ./configure make sudo make install It's only 3 commands. As for firefox , there is a ppa that does your life easier. If you still want to go for the manual procedure and do it ...


1

You can, you even can unpack .deb files to learn how they are put together. But the whole creation process of a .deb file is a lengthly process which is described already multiple times like here, up to that is Google is your friend in this case, theres plenty of information around. Long story short the command for unpacking a .deb file: dpkg-deb -R ...


4

Use \% instead of % - cron uses % as a newline.


14

cron treats % as newlines. You need to use escape it i.e. use \% to get literal % as used in date. So you need: date +"\%Y\%m\%d\%H\%M" Or you can use a script and use all the commands in the script and call the script from crontab. From man 5 crontab: Percent-signs (%) in the command, unless escaped with backslash (\), will be changed into ...


0

This should fix your Script but this long time not already does what you want to achieve: DATE=$(date +"%d-%b-%Y") cd ~/comp232/ tar -caf lab5-$DATE.tgz lab5 mv *.tgz ~/Documents However assuming all directories you want to .tgzare in the same parent folder you can do something like this: DATE=$(date +"%d-%b-%Y") cd ~/comp232/ for f in ./* # for each ...


0

One fascinating option is to recompile tar to use multithreaded by default. Copied from this stackoverflow answer Recompiling with replacement If you build tar from sources, then you can recompile with parameters --with-gzip=pigz --with-bzip2=lbzip2 --with-lzip=plzip After recompiling tar with these options you can check the output of tar's help: $ tar ...



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