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look for hidden files through ls -a I looked up some material on repairing tar and came across this http://riaschissl.bestsolution.at/2014/03/repost-how-to-repair-corrupt-tar-archives/ Basically I think you need to open tar file in a hex editor and experiment with which sections are good.


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Gromit package is in Official Ubuntu Repository. You can easily install it by : sudo apt-get install gromit


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Use in your ~/.bash_aliases: alias gzip="pigz" alias gunzip="unpigz"


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First extract the tar.xz using the following command, tar -xzf [filename] Once the file get extracted install using the command, type ./configure make sudo make install


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The best solution would be to setup everyting again on the server and copy only the "production data". (You should document your setup, so that you can recreate it whenever necessary and only need backups for restoring production data.) Restoring parts of an operating system to another existing system is a bad idea and will result in inconsistencies. For ...


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You should declare --one-file-system first before the exclusion rule. There is note from the same guide you followed. If you want to exclude all other mounts other than the current - by this I mean partitions mounted to directories - then use the --one-file-system option appended before the exclusion rules. This has the effect of stopping tar from ...


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The easiest way to do that is to cd to the directory first: cd /path/to/containing/folder && tar -zcvf tarfile.tar.gz foldername_tocompress So that the (containing) folder's directory becomes the root directory of your compressed file. A bit more advanced is using the -C option: tar -zcvf tarfile.tar.gz -C /path/to/foldername_tocompress . This ...



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