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Once data goes into swap, it is normal for it to stay there even once your memory starts to free up again. It is a good thing and there is no need for concern. Due to hard disk access being significantly slower than memory, your system will avoid swapping data in or out of swap when it doesn't think it is necessary for system performance or stability. So, ...


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I see you are using LVM partitions. df command never shows swap partitions because they are not a file system partition. You can check your existing Logical Volumes with lvs command and check your device mapper (dm-X) devices witch ls -l /dev/mapper/ or dmsetup ls


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To force Linux not use the swap, run sudo swapoff -a As for turning off the disk, you can do that through the included "Disks" application. See screenshot. (The option is grayed out for me as it is my system drive)


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You could look into the tlp package (sudo apt install tlp will install it). Once installed, it sets up various power-saving optimizations for laptops automatically. It's quite "set-it-and-forget-it"; once it's installed, you don't need to manually do anything to make it work. Spinning down hard drives when they are idle is a feature supported by tlp; ...


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You can indeed use swapfile as temporary addition to your system memory. Personally, I have an SSD and use 1 GB swap file for protection instead of having a partition , since it's a compromise between using the limited disk space, but having extra memory if I ever run out of RAM First create the file itself sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/swapfile bs=1M ...


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Open Disk Utility. In the left column, look for your hard disk, and click on it. In the right column, see if you can find "Swap". If so, you have swap enabled; you can click on that portion to see details. Alternately, open a terminal with Ctrl+Alt+T, and type swapon -s; if you see a line like the below, with statistics, swap is enabled: ...


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The slowness will quickly clear up on its own as the swapped out data is brought back in when it is needed. It won't be swapped out again as long as you have plenty of free ram, but plenty of other data that you have not accessed might still remain in swap, waiting for you to actually need it again.


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Since the swap doesn't have any data stored on it, you can swapoff, remove the swap volume, extend your home-partition and recreate the swap at the end of the drive.


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It's barely possible what you want to achieve and not worth effort. In your case, I would consider mounting NTFS partition in Linux, so that its content would be visible under some folder on linux, like /home//Desktop/NTFS. This Ubuntu page might be valuable for you to read and follow: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/MountingWindowsPartitions



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