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30

That's actually Inkscape's default. Open File → Document Properties and click the background colour. Make sure the alpha channel is 0. As so: Go to File → Export Bitmap (Shift+Ctrl+E) and save a file with a .png extension. You're done.


22

You can find lots of marketing materials on Spread Ubuntu, they have some great looking SVG posters which can be downloaded and edited using Inkscape. You may also be interested in joining the Ubuntu Marketing Team or the Ubuntu Art Team which are both involved in created posters and logos. You can also find some nice materials on openclipart, while not ...


20

[There are two types of editing software in media production: vector editors and bitmap editors. GIMP is the latter type of editor and .svg is a file extension used for vector graphics.] Inkscape can do even more. We can import the bitmaps we had already put so much work in to Inkscape and convert them with a few mouse clicks to nice vector graphics. Here ...


12

You could manually make an SVG fairly simply in a text editor. It's not a hard language. <svg height="2000" width="2000"> <polygon points="..." style="fill:white;stroke:black;stroke-width:1" /> </svg> So that's the base document. You'd replace the ... with a space-separated list of coordinates. I just used a text-editor's ...


9

It appears you can use Inkscape from command line: `#{INKSCAPE_PATH} -z -f #{source_svg} -w #{width} -j -e #{dest_png}` more details I imagine you can write a simple bash script to process all SVG files: #!/bin/sh for file in *.svg do /usr/bin/inkscape -z -f "${file}" -w 640 -e "${file}.png" done the example above converts all .svg files in the ...


8

It might be useful to contact your Local Community Team and ask if they have any professionally printed posters or flyers available. (We do!) The LoCoTeam might also have info about localised poster & flyer designs, and other promotional material. Or they might want to cooperate with you in having something printed (printing in larger volumes is a lot ...


6

GIMP is a raster graphics editor application. SVG is a form of vector graphics. If you want to edit SVG files, you should install the inkscape package and use Inkscape instead. Also, beware that SVG is not totally "scalable" in the sense that you will get a good image at every size you scale to, so depending on what you are creating with it, you may need to ...


5

You have two options: Option 1 The first requires a recent builds of Blender (available from Graphicall), which can now use the Freestyle rendering engine Freestyle is a software for Non-Photorealistic Line Drawing rendering from 3D scenes. Within Freestyle there exists a plugin, SVGWriter, that can write Blender scenes to SVGs. Instructions for ...


4

In addition to the above, you can also organize a Software Freedom Day event. Some of the flyers / posters / etc. are generic enough to be used year-round. You can find some of those at: http://wiki.softwarefreedomday.org/StartGuide#Useful_Documents.2C_Templates.2C_Files_and_Examples


4

If you want to make a copy of them all in to one directory try the following: sudo updatedb mkdir $HOME/svg locate *.svg | awk -F'/' '{X=NF-1;Y=NF-2;Z=NF-3}{ system("cp "$0" '$HOME'/svg/"$Z"\"-\""$Y"\"-\""$X"\"-\""$NF) }' That will copy all SVG files into an svg folder in your home. You can of course adjust those paths as needed. Since a lot of the System ...


4

Try gtk-vector-screenshot. According to it's specs it can only make screenshots of GTK3 applications but maybe you are lucky. I used it some time ago and it was fine. You can install it by: sudo apt-get install gtk-vector-screenshot and run it by: take-vector-screenshot Some sources also say you have to logout and login again before you can use it.


3

Open File -> Document Properties and click the background color. Then set alpha 0 in background color dialog -> close the dialog -> File menu -> Export Bitmap -> Choose export file name (click on Browse button -> type file name with .png extension) -> click on Export button. ! Done.


3

You can find a lot of mimetype SVG icons in /usr/share/icons/gnome/scalable. A lot of application icons are located in /usr/share/icons/hicolor/scalable/apps and /usr/share/pixmaps.


3

http://libregraphicsworld.org/blog/entry/getting-crisper-text-out-of-inkscape should help you :)


2

Try Gimp "Spread" filter (Filter > Noise > Spread) with 40px value for your sample I found it in a comment in Inkscape bug tracker and it produces great results IMHO


2

Well, I don't know how you expect dither to work, but usually you dither hires signal to lores, while you seem to expect to dither lores, which can't work of course. Yeah, no. Dithering in gradients is not done for reasons of resolution, but for reasons of bit-rate. You get banding effects because InkScape's export to PNG incorrectly rounds down the ...


2

Anyway, I wanted to suggest SubLCD as I've used it in the past, but as it works with PPM images I just don't remember how I did transparency, and it's unusable for small fonts as is Here is quick and dirty solution (I don't know about your source files and if this is usable to you, but in general works fine): Render SVG on screen with EOG or else. Capture ...


2

Corel as well as Illustrator can recognize and read SVG format. But the problem is that sometimes they don't open SVG properly. Generally some publishers can print from pdf. I think, the main issue is to get along with the publishing house about the file prepared for print.


2

Don't know if I come too late. For simple 3D modeling + vector rendering there is swift3D (commercial software). Results are not bad and editable with illustrator (with of course complex pathes).


2

Graphical Nautilus Script Overview The command line is great for batch conversions but sometimes you just don't want to leave the comfort of your GUI. That's why I coded a GUI-based Nautilus script to batch convert SVG files to PNG images. Other file managers with custom actions (e.g. Thunar) should be supported, too. Screenshot Script #!/bin/bash ...


2

Overview Turns out there is a way to do this using xsltproc, a command-line xslt-processor. The style-sheet we are going to use was developed by Robert Kosten and released on the issues tracker of the evolus Pencil project page. Quoted from the bug report: I would love to have this through the UI, but until then I've written a small XSLT-Sheet that ...


2

So you are looking for raster to vector graphics converter. potrace & autotrace both are in Ubuntu repository. Myself I tried potrace before which gave nice results with default options. As I remember, both tools do not support compressed formats as input, only bitmap images. See Potrace examples Potrace: utility to transform bitmaps into vector ...


2

Try this: #!/bin/bash if [ $# -eq 1 ]; then width=$1 height=$1 else if [ $# -eq 2 ]; then width=$1 height=$2 else echo "Error: missing parameters!" echo "Usage: myscript.sh width [height]" exit 1 fi fi ls *.svg | while read file do destFile=`echo $file | sed 's/\.svg/\.png/'` inkscape -f ...


2

If you have GNU Parallel try this (based on Letizia's solution): #!/bin/bash if [ $# -eq 1 ]; then width=$1 height=$1 else if [ $# -eq 2 ]; then width=$1 height=$2 else echo "Error: missing parameters!" echo "Usage: myscript.sh width [height]" exit 1 fi fi parallel inkscape -f {} -w $width -h $height -e {.} ::: *.svg ...


1

You can save as the image as pdf from inkscape directly using the highest resolution (dpi), say 600, of the printer you plan to use for printing. Afterwards, you can use imagemagick (command convert) to crop the upper and lower parts of the image independently into two different pdf files. For instance (typed on a terminal): convert askUbuntu.pdf -crop ...


1

Have you tried the pdfposter package? From the project's website: "Pdfposter can be used to create a large poster by building it from multiple pages and/or printing it on large media. It expects as input a PDF file, normally printing on a single page. The output is again a PDF file, maybe containing multiple pages together building the poster. The input page ...


1

After some research I did it ;) Here is the code for svg2png.sh #!/bin/sh # Saves all *.svg as *.png # Check if SVG files are in this folder else exit indir=$(ls -1 *.svg | wc -l)>/dev/null 2>&1; if [ "$indir" -gt "0" ] then # Check if width-parameter is given else state an error and exit if [ -z "$1" ] then echo 'Script usage: ./svg2png width ...


1

So the answer is, that the needed library was not packaged in the Qt 5.0.0 in ppa:canonical-qt5-edgers/qt5-proper. In Qt 5.0.1, which is currently in the ppa:canonical-qt5-edgers/qt5-beta-proper it works again.


1

The SVGs do not use any more CPU to render than PNGs do. You can however, use PNGs if you wish instead of SVGs. Regardless of which you choose, you need to draw the icons at various different sizes to get the best results.


1

Download SVGedit and place it (unziped) in extensions/SVGEdit/svg-edit Open LocalSettings.php (with some terminal editor such as vim or nano) and add or change the following: i. require_once("$IP/extensions/SVGEdit/SVGEdit.php"); ii. $wgFileExtensions[] = 'svg'; iii. $wgAllowTitlesInSVG = true; iv. $wgSVGConverter = 'ImageMagick'; In terminal issue the ...



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