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0

Make sure your network connection works. If your network connection works, please choose another repository server by 1. software center --> edit --> software sources --> Download From 2. choose the other server. By the way, Raring is EOF(end of life). It would not be supported anymore. I suggest you to use the other distribution, e.g. Ubuntu 14.04


0

If you are in doubt, almost certainly the answer is you should not use sudo. Each time you try sudo make install you expose your system to potential bugs, as root. I am a practicing sysadmin and regularly need to setup software for third parties; unless there is something that is truly system-aspect (such as a kernel module), most of the software gets ...


0

Add your hostname to /etc/hosts like so: echo $(hostname -I | cut -d\ -f1) $(hostname) | sudo tee -a /etc/hosts


4

As an addendum, consider using checkinstall to generate a managed package, then installing it with dpkg or another apt tool. For installing software from source this can relieve many headaches when it comes time to upgrade, remove, or resolve problems.


2

The guide you are following assumes that you wish to install ffmpeg to ~/bin/ in your HOME direcetory. This has the advantage of not needing sudo for installing but we will not be able to use ffmpeg system-wide from all users. In addition, this path does not exist in a default Ubuntu installation, where self-compiled sytem-wide software should preferably ...


4

It depends upon where your package is going to be install. During installation you need to enter sudo if you are performing installation in the system directories like /usr. You are needed to enter this because you do not have the write permission in that directory. A local install will not require sudo before make install


6

In your case you don't need to do a sudo make install as you will install the library in your $HOME. You have configured the build to use a prefix and bindir to install it in your $HOME. To make the package avaiable to other programs it would be better to choose directories outside of your $HOME. Then you will need to do the make install using sudo.


0

I'm working on an example for you.... I would use a bash script for each workspace and add the commands there. that's the basic idea, then you can add commands like this, where you start a new terminal and run some commands. and just update your bash file which should be like this filename.sh and mark it executable so you can launch it by just double ...


0

This is imperfect but close enough: #!/bin/bash set -e gksudo --description "Launch a root Nautilus" -- \ sh -c "echo 'Password accepted'" gksudo -- sh -c "xdg-open / &" & PID_GKSUDO=`pgrep -n gksudo` sleep 10 PID_XDGOPEN=`pgrep -u root -n xdg-open` sudo kill $PID_XDGOPEN $PID_GKSUDO exit 0 Some explanations: set -e This ensures the script exits if ...


0

Boot your PC while holding Ctrl+Shift, you should see the GRUB menu appear. While focusing on the first Ubuntu entry, press e to edit it. You should see a line which ends with ro quiet splash --. Change this last part to: rw verbose init=/bin/bash -- Don't touch the first part of the string, leave it the same as before. Now press Ctrl+X to boot. You ...


0

How can you modify your username to match that of root? Typing sudo su on terminal once started will let you act as root for the entire session.


1

Never ever ever delete stuff unless you are SURE that it's okay to delete it! In your case, you are looking for the mount command. /dev/sda7 is a block file, not a directory. To see the files available on hard drive 1, sector 7, run this command: sudo mount /dev/sda7 /mnt All of the files on /dev/sda7 will be in the /mnt folder on your hard drive, and ...


1

Using the disown bash builtin, I can get xdg-open to detach from gksudo, but cannot do anything about nautilus: The command: gksudo --description "Launch a root Nautilus" -- bash -c "xdg-open / & disown" The effect: $ pstree -ps $(pgrep -u root nautilus) ...


2

The redirection is not part of the sudo command. Depending on the operation you can do: sudo bash -c 'crontab -l >/var/backup/crontab' Or if the command doesn't need sudo: crontab -l | sudo tee /var/backup/crontab


0

Test this: sudo -i crontab -l > /var/BackUp/crontab


0

You can solve it by booting to a LiveCD and running: sudo fdisk -l sudo fsck /dev/sda1 You will be prompted to answer a few questions. yes or y will suffice.


2

While your user may have permission to read the file, your user doesn't have permission to write the file. Use ls -l <filename> to list permissions, owner and group of the file. If appropriate, change permissions or owner so you can write to the file. How to use the chown command chown changes the user and/or group ownership of for given file. The ...


1

This command: sudo sed "s/\(^$(whoami):\)[^:]*/\1/" /etc/shadow > /etc/shadow won't work, since the redirection isn't part of the sudo. Instead, do: sudo sed -i.bak "s/\(^$(whoami):\)[^:]*/\1/" /etc/shadow I have made this edit on the original post as well.


0

The easiest way to add a supersecretuser to sufo group is sudo gpasswd -a supersecretuser sudo and have supersecretuser log out/back in; but if you have lost the ability to sudo, I'm afraid you'll have to reinstall.


1

Since you error message says your user is not in the sudoers file, could you please check your /etc/sudoers file, see if there is such a line: %sudo ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL If this line is missing, users in the sudo group will not be sudoers. You can also try to add a customized line like this: root ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL Replace root with your username, ...


1

As per your conversation with @steeldriver in the comments, my guess is that your user isn't logged off. The easiest way to make sure that the supersecretuser has logged off is to type into terminal, as another user, who. When doing so, I get output like this: mitch@quartz:~$ who mitch :0 2014-09-08 09:49 (:0) mitch pts/0 2014-09-08 ...


0

The official Vagrant docs now cover this: https://docs.vagrantup.com/v2/synced-folders/nfs.html You need to add entries to the /etc/sudoers file, and the way to edit that is to type this at the terminal: sudo visudoers Type your password, and you're editing the file. You'll want to paste these lines below (depending on whether you are running Vagrant on ...


3

You can login to a terminal using Ctrl+Alt+F1. There, login with your account (primary or secondary), and then give sudo privileges to your secondary profiles typing: sudo adduser "username" sudo replacing "username" by the name of your secondary account. This will add it to the sudoers group (named sudo, not admin). Then, exit that terminal typing exit, ...


1

When gksu/gksudo doesn't work or is unavailable, you can use sudo -H instead. If you run a graphical program with sudo instead of gksu/gksudo, you should use sudo -H ... (or sudo -i ...) instead of just sudo .... sudo -H subl sudo -i subl (Neither plain sudo ... nor those ways will typically work from the Unity dash, because they need a terminal on ...


0

Finally the problem is solved. I have just added the line: Defaults env_keep="DISPLAY XAUTHORITY" at the end of visudo. To do that you have to run sudo visudo it will open the file then add the above line at the end. Thanks to all, specially @Thor for kind help


-1

Does the file exist and do you have read permissions on it. Is it executable, it's directory path needs to be executable. The commands ls -l and chmod will help. Secondly your terminology is a bit microsoft, sh files which execute more like .bat files and binaries which ms calls .exe.


1

The syntax: adduser <username> <group> is for adding an existing user to an existing group. So you will have to create the testadminuser before adding to any group: adduser testadminuser adduser testadminuser sudo You can use the usermod command to combine both steps, but that is a bit more involved.


1

Yes you have to use sudo for each command or you can use sudo sh -c "gedit first; gedit second" Above creates a documets first and second with root privllages. Separate the commands with semicolon ;


1

To enter your password via GUI, you need gksu to be installed: sudo apt-get install gksu Then: Make a new text document in Gedit, then copy paste this into it: #!/bin/bash gedit /etc/hosts gedit /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/000-default.conf Save the file as filename.sh This is a shell script to run your commands in a sequence (the second file will ...


1

A convenient way is to create a dedicated .desktop file, or add your commands to an existing one, asking your password via GUI (gksu). In the example below, I add the command to run Gedit and Software Center with sudo privileges to the Gedit launcher. You will need to have gksu installed to use this setup: sudo apt-get install gksu Copy the Gedit .desktop ...


2

TL;DR: Try installing the policykit-1 and policykit-1-gnome packages. You probably need polkit (a.k.a. PolicyKit). Most graphical system administration utilities in Ubuntu, including the Software Center, can usually be run without sudo or anything quite like it. You just run them the same way you'd run any program. When it comes time to perform a task ...


1

After running passwd -l on a user, that user can't set their password (until after it's set back to something usable). Since you cannot use sudo, you'll need to reset your user account password, the same way as if you'd just forgotten what it was: How do I reset a lost administrative password? Or How do I reset a lost password (using recovery mode ...


1

You will likely need to login to a root shell via the recovery console in order to re-enable your account password. After that, you can disable password login for ssh specifically by setting PasswordAuthentication no in the sshd_config file, and leave the account password enabled for local access (including running sudo once you have logged in via SSH ...


1

This is not actually my answer. This answer was given by a user (@steeldriver) in this post. I added the following to the start-up applications: sudo -H -u root -- /usr/bin/mono /usr/lib/AirVPN/AirVPN.exe path=/home/nanostuff/.airvpn and: nanostuff ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: /usr/bin/mono /usr/lib/AirVPN/AirVPN.exe path=/home/nanostuff/.airvpn to the ...


0

I would post this as a comment but as I do not have enough reputation to post comments yet I'll post this as an answer instead. Is there any particular reason why you are using their VPN client rather than say the network manager built into Ubuntu? A quick look in the AirVPN forums found this guide which should show you how to configure the AirVPN service ...


0

From boot meny, select recovery mode (ususally second from top), wait for the boot-up till you are presented with the Recovery Menu. Select the root option from the menu and you will drop in the root shell. Re-mount the file system as read-write mount -o rw,remount / Add your user to sudo group adduser username sudo And, exit. exit You will go ...


5

It lets you type the password, it just doesn't show it to you. Type the correct password and press enter. You should be able to go.


1

This is expected behaviour - sudo resets the environment by default. Starting a root shell with sudo su is one workaround. You can also modify the sudo behaviour (see the linked page).


0

I had the same problem after changing to ubuntu-desktop from lubuntu on my imac. It seems, that 'policykit-1-gnome' was missing. After reinstalling sudo apt-get install policykit-1-gnome and logout-login it works flawlessly.


0

Sudo is short for super user do and it is the application that lets you do root tasks without switching users. Your sudo password is going to be the same password you use to login. For more information, type man sudo at the cmd line. As for the rest, I'm just going to copy (with very slight modification) from Novice's answer to another question: Try this ...


1

The default sudo password for your installation (I am assuming you are a new user) is the password you set for yourself, when you set up Ubuntu. By default, you are a member of the sudoers list, and the system is asking you to verify who you are.


2

Sudo is for users that have been put on the Sudoers list; in other words, users that have been granted limited administration rights. This allows people to modify otherwise restricted things, without direct root access, and allows for effective logging of such actions. The sudo password is your password. For example, [sudo] password for bowser: I would ...


2

If I understand you correctly, you would like to set up a universal password that all users would have to input in order to execute a command as root with a sudo command. Example: Account-A = Password-1 Account-B = Password-2 root = root-password If Account-A or Account-B enters the command: sudo apt-get autoclean Then the subsequent output: ...



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