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0

This is not actually my answer. This answer was given by a user (@steeldriver) in this post. I added the following to the start-up applications: sudo -H -u root -- /usr/bin/mono /usr/lib/AirVPN/AirVPN.exe path=/home/nanostuff/.airvpn and: nanostuff ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: /usr/bin/mono /usr/lib/AirVPN/AirVPN.exe path=/home/nanostuff/.airvpn to the ...


0

I would post this as a comment but as I do not have enough reputation to post comments yet I'll post this as an answer instead. Is there any particular reason why you are using their VPN client rather than say the network manager built into Ubuntu? A quick look in the AirVPN forums found this guide which should show you how to configure the AirVPN service ...


0

From boot meny, select recovery mode (ususally second from top), wait for the boot-up till you are presented with the Recovery Menu. Select the root option from the menu and you will drop in the root shell. Re-mount the file system as read-write mount -o rw,remount / Add your user to sudo group adduser username sudo And, exit. exit You will go ...


5

It lets you type the password, it just doesn't show it to you. Type the correct password and press enter. You should be able to go.


1

This is expected behaviour - sudo resets the environment by default. Starting a root shell with sudo su is one workaround. You can also modify the sudo behaviour (see the linked page).


0

I had the same problem after changing to ubuntu-desktop from lubuntu on my imac. It seems, that 'policykit-1-gnome' was missing. After reinstalling sudo apt-get install policykit-1-gnome and logout-login it works flawlessly.


0

Sudo is short for super user do and it is the application that lets you do root tasks without switching users. Your sudo password is going to be the same password you use to login. For more information, type man sudo at the cmd line. As for the rest, I'm just going to copy (with very slight modification) from Novice's answer to another question: Try this ...


1

The default sudo password for your installation (I am assuming you are a new user) is the password you set for yourself, when you set up Ubuntu. By default, you are a member of the sudoers list, and the system is asking you to verify who you are.


2

Sudo is for users that have been put on the Sudoers list; in other words, users that have been granted limited administration rights. This allows people to modify otherwise restricted things, without direct root access, and allows for effective logging of such actions. The sudo password is your password. For example, [sudo] password for bowser: I would ...


2

If I understand you correctly, you would like to set up a universal password that all users would have to input in order to execute a command as root with a sudo command. Example: Account-A = Password-1 Account-B = Password-2 root = root-password If Account-A or Account-B enters the command: sudo apt-get autoclean Then the subsequent output: ...


0

This may mean your DNS lookups are broken. Your /etc/hosts file looks fine. You want it too look like this: 127.0.0.1 localhost 127.0.1.1 ubuntu-server But there are several legitimate variants. Make sure you have a matching hostname in /etc/hostname . Check /etc/resolv.conf to see if you have working name servers defined. See if ...


1

From the terminal do: sudo apt-get install gksu Then: gksu-properties in the window that opens change authentication mode to sudo. Now it should work.


8

It's sudo !! and not sudo!! Bash expands the !! exactly - it doesn't add spaces where there were none.


2

In addition there are logging considerations to consider between sudo and su. Being su simply does everything as root with no entry other than one line in the auth log saying you became root. Sudo on the other hand - always gets logged as your user ID with escalated priveleesw.


0

You can use pkexec even if you are not in sudoers. Do: pkexec visudo and add back an entry for your username. pkexec will accept your password since PolicyKit authorization is configured elsewhere, and is probably untouched by whatever messed with sudoers.


1

You have misread the documentation. Given the spec: user host = (target_user:target_group) command in the sudoers of a system with hostname/IP host, user can execute command as target_user/target:group. If the system doesn't have hostname/IP host, this rule doesn't apply. Only the current system's hostname/IP is ever checked. It does not apply to remote ...


1

Short answer without using any editor (tested on bash) Set sudo without password for the current user sudo echo "$USER ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:ALL" | sudo tee -a /etc/sudoers Verify if you can use sudo without password ... sudo cat /etc/sudoers | grep "$USER" .. or simply try it with sudo <anything>


1

I was having the same issue even though the hostname in my /etc/hostname file and /etc/hosts file matched. My hostname was "staging_1". It turns out that you can't have an underscore in your hostname, which is why I was getting this error. Changing the underscore to a hyphen fixed my problem.


1

This also worked for me: %domain^admins ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL I assume this is because of the following commands used when setting up PBIS: sudo /opt/pbis/bin/config UserDomainPrefix $domain sudo /opt/pbis/bin/config AssumeDefaultDomain true sudo /opt/pbis/bin/config LoginShellTemplate /bin/bash sudo /opt/pbis/bin/config HomeDirTemplate %H/%U This seems to ...


2

If you don't trust someone to have full shell access on your system, don't give them shell access at all. You want to stop cp command what about other commands that acts like cp , what about if admins use scp command . Am not saying its impossible to block this command , but a play around trick will defeat your goal .


-1

pkexec There is an ubiquitous alternative to kdesudo and gksu - pkexec which is from policykit-1 package that is required by lots of packages.


1

It is a really bad idea to run uTorrent (or any server software for that matter) as root, even if the linked post instructed you to. That is really bad advice. You should create a separate user using adduser and run uTorrent as that user. You don't even need to install it into /usr/local, just put uTorrent in the new user's home directory. Is uTorrent ...


7

Impossible. Absolutely impossible. If they know the admin password they can do a-n-y-t-h-i-n-g and can always revert any change you make to the system. If you are the admin of those system you need to re-install those computers. There is no telling what those students did to those systems (for all you know they installed a keylogger, a mailserver or some ...


0

you can do this with root login (no sudo) in your terminal you should simply input su - it will ask you the root password, not the erfan's one after that edit your file


2

The OP found that the the problem is caused by a bug in Virtualbox: The issue is related to the VirtualBox "Guest additions" software. This post confirms there is a bug in version 4.3.14: http://forums.virtualbox.org/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=62687 VirtualBox 4.3.14 is the latest version, which I am using. As a work around I will downgrade to an ...


1

At this juncture, as you have gotten so far outdated (two full releases,) it is probably best to do a reinstall and keep your system up to date after that. Download a 14.04 iso and install it using the same username and password and it should preserve your files and packages intact. You could try updating to 13.10 by adding an archive repo, but I would ...


1

Open Terminal By CTRL+ALT+T and Type :- sudo passwd And Re-Enter your password !


1

try using sudo passwd root to change password for your su user. See if that helps. Then retry using su and entering the password you have have have just assinged.


0

I think you can do what you are looking for using: sudo su This works for me on Ubuntu 14.04. Although in general you should be careful about doing this for security reasons.


1

In Ubuntu by default, the root user has a disabled password and the mechanism available for general users to use root permissions is sudo. su with no arguments attempts to change the current user to root, and since it is disabled....


1

It's probably that you have damaged files on the system. Perhaps something went wrong during the upgrade, or the upgrade was halted before it was finished (possibly due to a power loss, or running out of disk space?) Segmentation fault is a serious error that should not occur in normal situations. This other answer suggested the use of: aptdcon ...


3

As posted, the line in your second echo is wrong; I tried manually adding django ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL celery ALL(www-data) NOPASSWD: /usr/bin/unoconv to my sudoers using visudo and I also get a syntax error. You need = before (www-data) in the second line. A tip to validate sudo syntax without destroying your sudoers file: echo 'blah blah' | visudo -f - ...


5

Yes the root user is an official one. That user comes from a long line of historical influences. It's the conventional name of the user who has all rights or permissions. Most Unix-linke operating systems have a root user. It's not always called "root". You may know the Administrator of Windows operating systems. Some Linux derivates like Ubuntu allow ...


1

It is root. In Ubuntu root defaults to having no password set so you have to sudo su - or sudo -s to login as root. Or if you really wanted, set a password for root and bypass the need for sudo (not adviseable) sudo su - Open the root users default environment, So you get the root users shell etc.. sudo -s Will open the shell defined in the ...


0

I was able to make it work with the following: %domain^admins ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL (i.e., remove the domain)


1

First enable the root account by setting a password: sudo passwd Then enable manual login in LightDM (assuming 14.04): sudo tee /usr/share/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d/50-allow-manual.conf <<EOF [SeatDefaults] greeter-show-manual-login=true EOF Restart LightDM: sudo service lightdm restart Login as root. You'll have to type both username and ...


0

Assuming you are on Ubuntu 14.04, and you want to avoid the command line, otherwise sudo works fine. I believe your answer is here which is a "open as admin" right-click context menu.


2

In Nautilus you have two options to run a script when you double click on it: 1. Run in Terminal Using this option, your script will run correctly (as you said). 2. Run Using this option you have to use pkexec (or gksu if you have it installed) instead of sudo. That is because you can't run graphical commands which use sudo without to use an X ...


0

There are two ways to start your xsession from a text console like tty1 tty2 etc. I can only assume that is what you are referring to when you say terminal. If not, press CTRL + ALT + F2 and then sign in with your username and password. Once you are signed in, type the following command: sudo service lightdm start or sudo service lightdm restart If ...


0

Sudo does not preserve your environment variable. See the following link for an answer on how to configure sudo to do it: http://superuser.com/questions/232231/how-do-i-make-sudo-preserve-my-environment-variables


0

Overall just running it with sudo then the application name works just as well and displays a log in the terminal you ran it from. Not the same but it works.


1

In order to fix your problem, simply move your line: fizzbuzz ALL=NOPASSWD: ALL chadmin ALL=NOPASSWD: ALL form sudoers file to sudo visudo -f /etc/sudoers.d/myOverrides This is better approach than edit sudoers. Use always visudo, if you insert errors in the file, you may not longer be able to run sudo. Your directive doesn't work because are ...


0

If multiple entries match for a user the last one is used. So if fizzbuzz and chadmin are members of the groups admin or sudo they will be still asked for a password. Put the two lines at the end of the sudoers file after the #includedir line.


2

The root account in Ubuntu is defaultly disabled. When you enabled the root account (set a password for it) then you can disble it easy by the following command: sudo passwd -dl root -d means to delete the password (make it empty) -l means lock the password of the account


1

user10962 is right, "nuclear" approaches like reinstalling aren't necessary, but may be the best approach because this error message can indicate a larger problem. As an example, a friend of mine had this exact problem when he accidentally changed ownership of EVERYTHING in /usr/bin to . In this case, user10962's solution restores sudo permissions but ...


1

Another option is to use a temporary file. This is useful in a bash script. temp=$(mktemp) echo "Hello, world!" > $temp sudo cp $temp /etc/wherever


1

If xorg-dev is installed, you should have a file named /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libX11.so (or /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libX11.so on 64-bit, but HTK compiles in 32-bit even on 64-bit plateform, unless you patch it, so it's the i386-linux-gnu/libX11.so that is used anyway) then you can use the option --x-libraries of ./configure ./configure ...


0

I you want to disable shutdown command. cp /sbin/shutdown /sbin/shutdown-backup rm /sbin/shutdown this is because if someone tries to forcefully want to use this command, then also he cant now no one will be able to use shutdown command. it will display a message command not found install it. vim /etc/bash.bashrc Add a line in last of ...


1

You are asking no other user can do sudo to be a root user. you just need to edit a line in sudoers file. vim /etc/sudoers change the line from %admin ALL=(ALL) ALL to your-username ALL:(ALL) ALL after editing no other user except you can use sudo command. This is kicking all other users from sudoers file. except you.


0

Lshell is configured via an INI file. By default, it holds a whitelist of allowed commands, but it can be easily configured to prohibit user from using a specific command. http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/90998/block-particular-command-in-linux-for-specific-user



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