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Run the command below and re-apply the oxygen-gtk theme: sudo systemsettings


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follow these steps 1.edit sudoers file (this can be present in /etc/sudoers.d/file_name) sudo visudo -f /etc/sudoers 2.Add line at the end of the file usernameusedforlogin ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:ALL 3.save file esc :wq! please tell me if this solution works , for me it worked


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Here goes oneliner: dpkg -l | grep packagename | wc -l If it results in zero, this package is not installed.


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Looks like a script or a command went haywire and appended -src to a lot of debs. You'll have to delete a lot of lines to fix that. Or, to undo this damage, try this command: sed '62,$s/deb-src/deb/' /etc/apt/sources.list Inspect the output and ensure that: -src-src is not seen in any uncommented line (those not beginning with #). A line with deb is ...


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need not to remove it. just remove -src from deb-src-src http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ utopic main restricted to make it look like: deb-src http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ utopic main restricted I can see many such errors in your sources.list file. You have to find and edit all of them. open it in gedit: sudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list then ...


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From the what I can understand, this is the state of things: You were the original user, and probably have sudo privilege either by your username or by your other groups. But the PolicyKit privileges are still the default from Ubuntu (members of groups sudo and admin, and the root user). You can verify this: sudo cat ...


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I'm not sure your command needs root, but if it does, use cron: sudo crontab -e And add a line to root's crontab: @reboot screen -fa -d -m rtorrent


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You need to be using aliases in your .bashrc file not export. You need to be editing your /etc/bash.bashrc file to inclide, alias less="sudo less -m" more info from this POST


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You're trying to su to a user who's shell is /bin/false. /bin/false always exits with code 1, so you're never that user: $ sudo su - dnsmasq $ echo $? 1 If you want to start a shell with such a disabled user, use sudo: $ sudo -u dnsmasq /bin/bash $ whoami dnsmasq Note that dnsmasq usually has /sbin/nologin (a politer version of false) as the shell, so ...


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Hmmm, sudo su - [user] seems to work here, $ sudo su - jerk jerk ~ $ whoami jerk even though the su manpage says that - should be the last option When - is used, it must be specified as the last su option. The other forms (-l and --login) do not have this restriction. If I try that I get these errors, but it still works to login as ...


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Using wildcards in the sudoers file In the sudoers file, you can use wildcards (*), thus creating the possibility to run a script with arguments. An example I tested it with a shockingly simple python script. In the sudoers file I had to use the absolute path to python: /usr/bin/python in the line of the sudoers file: jacob ALL=NOPASSWD: ...


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The above methods didn't work for me, because I couldn't "log back in as root" (unknown password) But I got a root shell by editing vi /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf autologin-user=root greeter-show-manual-login=true After rebooting I was finally able to run chown root:root /usr/bin/sudo && chmod 4755 /usr/bin/sudo


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Try running the below command to fix the broken sudo - sudo chmod 0755 /var/lib/sudo sudo chmod 0700 /var/lib/sudo/<username> If the above command doesn't helps, you can run the below command : pkexec chmod 0755 /var/lib/sudo pkexec chmod 0700 var/lib/sudo/<username>


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You can restore the files but it will vastly depend on what has happened to the filesystem since you removed the files. Linux will retain files that are open which is why your sites still run, but the second you end the process that hold the locks you will effectively lose the files. The only likely way to recover the data is to shutdown and mount the disk ...


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While there is no way to undelete the files Your sites are still up so you can save the content from the browser. Of course if the sites are database driven then this will not help much. But if your sites are mostly static html and they are still in memory, you can use some browser tool to save them from your browser. There are some tools that can help ...


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There is no undo for sudo. It's a one time root runtime privilege. To better explain its like deleting your Win32 folder for Windows and wondering how to get it back. A simple re-install should fix your issue. I would recommend next time reading MAN on rm to better understand what the command does A simple reading of any terminal command before executing ...


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No, there is not a simple way to recover this data. A backup is the easiest way to get it back. However there are some complicated ways, such as one discussed in this Questions' Answers. Although these may not work if the commands are indeed broken like you said. If you've already gone too far for any of those methods, your next easiest method will likely ...


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You can use su directly if you have enabled the root user by setting a password for the same. This can be done with the command sudo passwd root


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I think I read somewhere that sudo does not pass along all environment variables on purpose, since that could be used to introduce root exploits (not unlike the recent bash bugs). Or you may need to use sudo with -E -E, --preserve-env Indicates to the security policy that the user wishes to pre‐ serve their existing environment ...


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Just type sudo passwd username to change username's password.


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To add support for sudoreplay, we need to edit the /etc/sudoers file. For this, execute the following command: $ sudo visudo This would open the sudoers file for us. Then insert the following lines at the end of the file and save it: Defaults log_output Defaults!/usr/bin/sudoreplay !log_output Defaults!/sbin/reboot !log_output It will automatically ...


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Perhaps writing the commands to a shell script, making it executable and running it with sudo will do what you need. However what you are doing is very dangerous. Allowing potentially untrusted command line to be executed as a root is a disaster waiting to happen. Look up "shell injection" type of vulnerabilities. Then perhaps consider reviewing what needs ...


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I'm not sure what the bigger picture is, but your approach should be to run the command with on a file in the directory. E.g. if you want to run grep regex file where file is in /root, then you should approach it like this: $ sudo grep regex /root/file And not: $ sudo 'cd /root; grep regex file' sudo: cd /root; grep regex file: command not found Why ...


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apt-mirror uses port 21 [courtesy of ProFTPd] (all ports below 1024 require root), and stores information in /etc, /var, or /opt. As none of these locations are user-writable, sudo is required. You may be able to get away by making apt-mirror store to a place you have write-access to, such as /home/$USER/.local-repo. sudo will still be needed to install ...


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Try export PATH=/usr/local/texlive/2012/bin/x86_64-linux:$PATH and then tlmgr install. Alternatively, try sudo sh -l -c tlmgr install


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Sudo seems to change your environment. You can try to run the command with full path: sudo /usr/bin/tlmgr install Also worth a try is to run sudo with -E: sudo -E tlmgr install


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fond this solution on some forum: try deleting this file: sudo -H rm ~/.config/geany/geany_socket_box* if you want you can move them to some folder temporarily.


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In the end I tried tapping both shift keys really fast on a system boot. This would only bring up the menu about one time in five. I think it's because the mohterboard is so new and so very fast at getting to the bootloader stage. Then I chose to go into rescue mode and then from the menu when to a root prompt. After getting a root prompt I did the usual.. ...



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