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0

Hmh a simple cp should do it, or am I wrong? cp /etc/default/keyboard.tmp /etc/default/keyboard then try to do a forced removal rm -rf /etc/default/keyboard.tmp If it still doesn't work I suggest, that the file is in use by a service or daemon or application and will be deleted after reboot or at least the Service/daemon/application has been closed.


0

Managed to sudo -u bob -- ssh bob@node Seems that sudo was passing the scp commands.


0

Uid 1000 is you. Uid 0 is root. Take a loot at output of ls -l /var/tmp . There's some folders that you have ownership of, and some that root owns. If you're not owner of a file and permissions are drwx------, you can't open it, simple as that. When you called kate with root privileges, kate needed to access folders that are owned by you, but the program was ...


-2

Ubuntu 12.04 needs an extra repository that you should add, try this sudo add-apt-repository ppa:fcwu-tw/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install vim


0

You can use sudo -H gedit instead. From man sudo: -H, --set-home Request that the security policy set the HOME environment variable to the home directory specified by the target user's password database entry. Depending on the policy, this may be the default behavior. AFAIK this request is honored on ...


0

I think it is better to add the "admin user" at the end of the file, because the admin should not have to put the password in every order in the terminal, and no other user is allowed to do it neither: # This file MUST be edited with the 'visudo' command as root. # # Please consider adding local content in /etc/sudoers.d/ instead of # directly modifying ...


-1

If you want to run the job as a different user, like root, you can edit the crontab with sudo which will allow you to run the wanted task to run as root: sudo crontab -e


0

I dont have much knowledge. But these steps solved my problem even without restarting my machine Follow these steps su root *enter root password cd /usr chmod -R 755 *


0

Have you tried sudo su - command . Running su root does not execute your profile , and any path variables set explicitly will not be available , might be the reason if missing auto complete. from error in comments ,right solution would be to change permission of your script, chmod u+x /home/marten/Downloads/NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-346.47.run ...


0

Use the command sudo su. This elevates privileges to Super User. Remember to type in exit after you're finished though. Constantly running as SU is dangerous. If you forget to exit, you're exposing your system.


0

As bodhi.zazen mentions, root log in from ssh might be disabled. Honestly, this is not a bad thing. You might want to consider getting used to having to "su -" to root if you have to (or sudo -i if you use it). Try the following to check, grep PermitRootLogin /etc/ssh/sshd_config If you see the following come by, root login is disabled. ...


2

sudo asks for your password by default. It is not recommended, but you may bypass passwords for users/groups for all, or limited commands, if you chose to do so. Here is why sudo asks for a password by default: Linux is a multi-user system, and the easiest way to see this is to look at the root user, vs your own user. Major system-critical components are ...


1

sudo overwrites the path for security reasons with a "secure" path. However you can modify this secure path to include your custom folder. Warning: this leaves your computer a bit unprotected. You can follow these steps for edit the secure path. Execute the command sudo visudo for edit /etc/sudoers Find this line (it should be at the start of the file): ...


1

It's a genuinely interesting idea but not without issues. You could add a "semiadmin" group (your choice on the name), put a user in that group instead of the "sudo" group, and then add /etc/sudoers lines using wildcards to match the common places root-owned commands live: %semiadmin (ALL)=/usr/bin/*,/bin/*,/sbin/* The problem with this approach is you ...


-1

Login as the owner of the file who is not root and revoke execution permission from other users using this command chmod o-x filename


0

Your account is member of the wheel/sudo group which allows you to perform super user commands, but it's not an "administrative" account like root. It is possible to use your root account to log on, removing the need to sudo. However, that practice is discouraged since it would expose the system to serious threats.


0

The user you are logged in as does not have all of the abilities necessary to perform all commands, this is to protect the system from accidental or intentional damage. Normally root and your username will have different passwords and only the system administrator will know the root password. It is a little different on a 1 user system where your username ...


1

I found the solution to the problem. I removed all of the individual sudo commands in my vpnon.sh script, and passed in sudo from outside of the script. In my /etc/init.d/vpnstartup file, I changed the su username -c to sudo $VPN_DIR/vpnon.sh which looks like this now: case "$1" in start) sudo $VPN_DIR/vpnon.sh ;; then called sudo ...


1

I solved the problem by doing these steps: I Switched on my computer. Wait until the BIOS has finished loading, or has almost finished. Quickly pressed and hold the Shift key, which will bring up the GNU GRUB menu. Select the line which starts with "Advanced options". Select the line ending with "(recovery mode)" Ubuntu GNU/Linux, with Linux ...


0

sudo -i gives a root prompt, passwd changes the root password, from that point you can login as usual.


5

lightdm is the X display manager for Ubuntu and killing the processes will effectively disable the graphical user interface of your system. If you do not need the graphical user interface then go ahead and kill the processes but it would be preferable to stop the lightdm service instead of killing the processes with: sudo service lightdm stop ...


0

If "everyone" is allowed to read and execute composer, you don't need to use sudo: sudo chmod 755 /var/local/bin/composer Since you already executed composer at least once as root, composers (per-user-)cache directory is now owned by root and therefore isn't writable by your normal user. sudo chown -R lamp:lamp /home/lamp/.composer will fix the ...


2

Please, enter in secure mode and edit sudoers: Switch on your computer. Wait until the BIOS has finished loading, or has almost finished. (During this time you will probably see a logo of your computer manufacturer.) Quickly press and hold the Shift key, which will bring up the GNU GRUB menu. (If you see the Ubuntu logo, you've missed the point where you ...


0

Try: su passwd -l root exit Once made this, try again sudo -i


0

we have a long domain name with .local sufix, neighter the %domainname\\group ALL=(ALL) ALL nor the %domainname.local\\group ALL=(ALL) ALL worked... but if I only use the groupname like this: %Domain^Admins ALL=(ALL) ALL it works.


2

Why do Linux instructions almost never include sudo even when it is obviously necessary? Because not all Linux systems use sudo. Because the guide you are following is not targeted towards "debian" style systems. Then do what you should do: sudo nano /etc/hosts and try again. Nope. You do sudo !! and press enter. The system will repeat the last ...


0

The -a flag is probably what you are looking for: cp -a /path/from /path/to The -a flag turns on recursive behaviour (which can also be done with the -R flag), and will also attempt to preserve metadata such as file ownership, permissions, timestamps, links, etc. You should only need to use sudo if you are copying to a location not owned by the current ...


0

It's in the nature of sudo to require typing in the password at login and after the password cache expired. If you keep your sudo password in an unencrypted text file (and even in an encrypted it's a bad idea) and want to manage it with kdewallet you don't have to worry about sudo -i because it's a much more secure alternative for your use case. Ah, and ...


0

Ctrl + Alt + T is going to be pressed at once. You could also go into the Unity search function by pressing the Super key and entering "Terminal". You will see Terminal show up under application.


0

To open a terminal, press Ctrl + Alt + T


0

Better to edit the /etc/group file and added as example below. sudo vim /etc/group xdrosenheim:x:1000:xdrosenheim,teamspeak,adm,sudo,moreGroups


0

You can try writing a NOPASSWD rule like so: deploy ALL = (root) NOPASSWD: /bin/cp -t /etc/nginx/sites-available *, /bin/ln -s /etc/nginx/sites-available/* /etc/nginx/sites-enabled Then the deploy use would directly copy to the sites-available folder, after creating the configuration elsewhere, then create the link (without a target name being specified). ...



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