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16

After usermod -G advanced dims the user dims is only a member of the group advanced but not of any other group. So as he isn't a member of the group admin or sudo he is no longer allowed to use sudo. To just add a user to another group you need to use the -a switch to usermod, like usermod -a -G advanced dims


0

This is a MySQL error. As this is a fresh install, just hit enter at the Enter current password for root prompt. The MySQL root user is not the system root user, and the system root user cannot magically get into the MySQL root account. They are different things entirely.


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I am not 100% certain with Debian 6, but with Debian 7, it always asks you to submit a root password during installation. If you are certain you have the root password, all you should need to do is type su root Enter your password, and you will temporarily have root access until you type exit. If you are getting authentication error, then you either ...


0

You can use su - command to switch to root account. If it fails, reboot in recovery mode, and you will be dropped to root shell.


2

Create a file with the required NOPASSWD line and drop it into /etc/sudoers.d. To verify the correctness of the file, use visudo to create it: visudo -f some-file cp some-file /etc/sudoers.d/ Then use scp or whatever means of control you use to send the files to the target systems. sudoers.d files are read in lexicographic order, so use some numbering ...


1

But to play these files I need VLC with sudo. I think it's a good reason. No, you're jumping to conclusions without thinking twice about possible causes for the issue you have and side effects or damage done to your installation by using such a crude workaround. How to read and write HFS+ journaled external HDD in Ubuntu without access to OS X? How to ...


8

This is documented in man sudoers. The setting you are looking for is: passwd_tries The number of tries a user gets to enter his/her pass‐ word before sudo logs the failure and exits. The default is 3. So, to change that to, for example, 5, run sudo visudo and add these lines: ## Allow a user to attempt to ...


0

You need only identify which partition it is on and mount it in the location of your choice. We can use parted to identify the partition like so: mgodby@mgodby-UDesk1:~$ sudo parted -l Model: ATA ST1000LM014-1EJ1 (scsi) Disk /dev/sda: 1000GB Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/4096B Partition Table: gpt Number Start End Size File system ...


0

Do gksu nautilus to launch nautilus with root permissions. After that, go to the files you need to delete. Right click on them and change the permissions so that all users have access to edit and delete them. After that, you can just delete them as you regularly would without root permissions.


31

Ah! Nice puzzle! Just say "exit", and all your files will be there (and the output you miss in a file called echo). Explication: su > echo user is the same as su user > echo So you are starting a (sub)shell with su (switch user) to your user, with all output redirected to a file called echo! Look: [romano:~] % cd tmp/dvd-usa-hd ...


1

The error message unknown user : root occurs when the user root was deleted from /etc/passwd. Boot a live USB, mount your root partition, and post the contents of /etc/passwd . If you are missing only root, you can add this at the top of the file root:x:0:0:root:/root:/bin/bash If the entire file is blank , corrupt, or incomplete, restore from backup. ...


1

The commands you copy-pasted here are messed up. Enter them one by one and it should work: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/swapfile bs=64M count=16 sudo mkswap /swapfile sudo swapon /swapfile You can check if it worked with: swapon -s It should show something like: Filename Type Size Used Priority /swapfile file ...


1

If you want to gain ownership of a drive you can use the chown command: sudo chown -R username:username /media/username/nameofdrive This gives the user ownership over the drive without allowing permission to unauthorized users and "-R" makes this command recursive so that ownership also applies to all of the existing individual files on the drive as well ...


0

The drives will be located in /media/username folder. Goto that directory using cd command. And then on terminal sudo chmod 777 nameofdrive 777 assigns read,write and execute permissions to all users.


1

The folder is owned by a different user. Only the owner of the folder or root can change the permissions using chmod. Therefore, in my case, sudo is required as my user does not own the folder.


0

There is wajig, a tool that adds another layer of more highlevel command line UI to the dpkg-... and apt-... tools. It has just the feature you need: $ wajig large lists the largest installed packages, counting the total size when unpacked and installed. That may be much larger than the *.deb file - it depends on file count and sizes instrange ways. ...


1

To reset your mysqld password just follow these instructions : Stop the mysql demon process using this command : sudo /etc/init.d/mysql stop Start the mysqld demon process using the --skip-grant-tables option with this command sudo /usr/sbin/mysqld --skip-grant-tables --skip-networking & Because you are not checking user privs at this point, ...


0

Well just run these comands pkexec apt-get install sudo then pkexec chmod 0440 /etc/sudoers.d/README And that's it


0

It sounds like a hostname resolution failure. Did you change your hostname recently? Yes In recovery mode, update your /etc/hosts with your new hostname so it points to 127.0.0.1, like so: 127.0.0.1 myNewHostname Also make sure that your hostname file is correct. No Your localhost is probably not resolving properly. In recovery mode, check your ...



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