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42

Sure it is. Run sudo visudo and add this line to your sudoers file: Defaults !tty_tickets As explained in man sudoers: tty_tickets If set, users must authenticate on a per-tty basis. With this flag enabled, sudo will use a separate record in the time stamp file for each tty. If disabled, a ...


18

Testing result: If you add @reboot reboot This did not work!!! Why? $ which reboot /sbin/reboot Now When i added the full path of reboot, the cron job runs normally. So you got an infinite loop of rebooting in the case: sudo crontab -e And add the line: @reboot /sbin/reboot EDIT: If you want to get rid off this, you probably need to boot ...


5

Either add a shebang at the first line of your script: #!/bin/bash echo "Hallo" And/or set the executable rights sudo chmod +x connector.sh


5

In my opinion, the link you refer to should read: wget https://launchpad.net/~webupd8team/+archive/ubuntu/java/+files/oracle-java6-installer_6u45-0%7Ewebupd8%7E8_all.deb sudo dpkg -i oracle-java6-installer_6u45-0~webupd8~8_all.deb wget https://launchpad.net/~webupd8team/+archive/ubuntu/java/+files/oracle-java6-set-default_6u45-0%7Ewebupd8%7E8_all.deb ...


4

just kill the command again: go the terminal from which you run the command sudo nautilus and then press the key Ctrl+C Or easily just close the terminal by clicking on X, this would kill nautilus process


2

It seems that you're trying to delete the folder from within the folder itself and giving a non-existing path for rm to delete. Do something like: cd ~/tmp sudo rm -rf remaster-iso


2

If you invoke sudo with the -H switch, mc should read/write its settings to root's home directory /root/.config/mc instead of writing them to your own home directory ~/.config/mc. From man sudo: -H, --set-home Request that the security policy set the HOME environment variable to the home directory specified by the target user's ...


2

Another possible solution is to call the script in this way: sh ./connector.sh you can use any other shell type other than sh, depends on your code.


2

You quoted the heredoc delimiter: sudo su<<'HERE' Variables in a heredoc are not expanded if the delimiter is quoted. From the docs: If any characters in word are quoted, the delimiter is the result of quote removal on word, and the lines in the here-document are not expanded. If word is unquoted, all lines of the here-document are ...


2

Try to solve running the command: sudo chown -R root:approachit /var/lib/sudo/approachit Then run the command: sudo chmod -R 700 /var/lib/sudo/approachit


1

These applications are likely using Polkit, not sudo (or gksudo or a similar frontend), for authorization. The default rule on Ubuntu for Polkit uses membership in sudo or admin groups: $ cat /etc/polkit-1/localauthority.conf.d/51-ubuntu-admin.conf [Configuration] AdminIdentities=unix-group:sudo;unix-group:admin Just create a new configuration file in ...


1

Try removing with apt-get remove --purge. Maybe some files got left around. check the output of which npm. How did you install nodejs? I think the upstream version packages npm along with with node, whereas they're separate in ubuntu. If you installed upstream npm, removing npm with apt just switched you to using upstream npm. If the problem is with ...


1

I have googled around and it seems (for some) that there is a bug in the latest Ubuntu software version of Nodejs that causes the segmentation fault that you are haveing The best way to install it is by getting node from the source and compiling it. I have setup a simple script on a github gist (right click and save as) that will take care of it. Make ...


1

The password is actually being typed in, but is not visible to the user. When the password is prompted from you, just type it in, press Enter and you've done :) Note the characters are not visible to increase user security.


1

Start your Python script inside your programm with su -c '<your_python_script>' - <your_user_name> Examples $ sudo su - $ whoami root $ su -c 'whoami' - aboettger aboettger or as script with the name foo #!/bin/bash whoami su -c 'whoami' - aboettger exit 0 example output sudo ./foo root aboettger


1

you must add the standard user to the /etc/sudoers files to give them priviledges to run elevated commands. For example with a user called 'demo': demo ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL The first field indicates the username that the rule will apply to (demo). The first "ALL" indicates that this rule applies to all hosts. The second "ALL" indicates that the demo user ...


1

Putting su at the top of the script, and then running the commands normally will work just fine. The reason you have to use sudo su instead of just sudo is because sudo only works on the main program, the redirection (>) is run without root privileges.


1

The correct command must be sudo cp /home/phablet/Pictures/background.png /usr/share/unity8/graphics/phone_background.png You missed a space between "from" and "to" path. The command in the question title is also wrong. It should be sudo mount -o remount,rw / I suggest to copy & paste commands, not to re-type them. Entering commands like you do ...


1

If you run sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -f this should be resolved. But you need to be connected to internet.


1

Since you're already root, instead of the complicated su -c "sudo /home/programer/bin/halt" user-name password - keep it simple /sbin/halt


1

Hold down the left Shift key before your system boots to Ubuntu and it should bring you to the grub menu. After you get to Recovery Mode with root access, you need to mount the drive in Read / Write to make any changes. mount -o remount,rw / then you can check was groups the user is part of: groups username then to add the user to group sudo usermod ...



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