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lightdm is the X display manager for Ubuntu and killing the processes will effectively disable the graphical user interface of your system. If you do not need the graphical user interface then go ahead and kill the processes but it would be preferable to stop the lightdm service instead of killing the processes with: sudo service lightdm stop ...


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Why do Linux instructions almost never include sudo even when it is obviously necessary? Because not all Linux systems use sudo. Because the guide you are following is not targeted towards "debian" style systems. Then do what you should do: sudo nano /etc/hosts and try again. Nope. You do sudo !! and press enter. The system will repeat the last ...


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Please, enter in secure mode and edit sudoers: Switch on your computer. Wait until the BIOS has finished loading, or has almost finished. (During this time you will probably see a logo of your computer manufacturer.) Quickly press and hold the Shift key, which will bring up the GNU GRUB menu. (If you see the Ubuntu logo, you've missed the point where you ...


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sudo asks for your password by default. It is not recommended, but you may bypass passwords for users/groups for all, or limited commands, if you chose to do so. Here is why sudo asks for a password by default: Linux is a multi-user system, and the easiest way to see this is to look at the root user, vs your own user. Major system-critical components are ...


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sudo overwrites the path for security reasons with a "secure" path. However you can modify this secure path to include your custom folder. Warning: this leaves your computer a bit unprotected. You can follow these steps for edit the secure path. Execute the command sudo visudo for edit /etc/sudoers Find this line (it should be at the start of the file): ...


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It's a genuinely interesting idea but not without issues. You could add a "semiadmin" group (your choice on the name), put a user in that group instead of the "sudo" group, and then add /etc/sudoers lines using wildcards to match the common places root-owned commands live: %semiadmin (ALL)=/usr/bin/*,/bin/*,/sbin/* The problem with this approach is you ...


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I solved the problem by doing these steps: I Switched on my computer. Wait until the BIOS has finished loading, or has almost finished. Quickly pressed and hold the Shift key, which will bring up the GNU GRUB menu. Select the line which starts with "Advanced options". Select the line ending with "(recovery mode)" Ubuntu GNU/Linux, with Linux ...


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I found the solution to the problem. I removed all of the individual sudo commands in my vpnon.sh script, and passed in sudo from outside of the script. In my /etc/init.d/vpnstartup file, I changed the su username -c to sudo $VPN_DIR/vpnon.sh which looks like this now: case "$1" in start) sudo $VPN_DIR/vpnon.sh ;; then called sudo ...



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