Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

You might take a closer look into the upstart directory to see what's getting big, but try changing the fstab attributes by removing the "noatime". This is ram so that is not necessary like it is on the ssd (or other flash with limited lifespan). I also don't use the defaults, but never actually run as long as you do. Here's my settings, (ignore the ramfs ...


4

I'm using Greyhole and it fits almost perfectly to my use case: home server re-use of spare hdds with different brands, models, sizes all hdds space can be seen as one big mount point (like jbod) you can set different shares with different needs of redundancy (ie. Photos=max redundancy, Data=simple redundancy, Movies=zero redundancy) hdds upgrade can be ...


0

If we are looking for a freeware application (if not, there is Insync) non-googledrive solutions are to be accepted as an alternative the idea is to have at least as much free space as google drive provides, there is already Megasync client for Linux. 50 GB for a free account and a sync app that, just like Dropbox and GoogleDrive for Windows (and ...


0

Should use baobab (disk usage analyzer) to check out what's taking up all the space, it does nice visual representations of folders & their relative sizes too. May have to run as root (sudo) in case there are lots of files hidden from your user. But sometimes web browsers could eat up space with their profiles or caches, or downloaded .deb files might ...


1

With the output of df -h, really the problem is the huge usage on the disk sda1. Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/sda1 146G 138G 554M 100% / none 4.0K 0 4.0K 0% /sys/fs/cgroup udev 742M 4.0K 742M 1% /dev tmpfs 151M 1.1M 150M 1% /run none 5.0M 4.0K 5.0M 1% /run/lock none 752M 540K 751M 1% /run/shm ...


0

Start with installing Ubuntu tweak, and clean all no longer needed files. Go to the terminal and type or copy: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:tualatrix/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install ubuntu-tweak run the program ubuntu-tweak


0

Approach 1: a bit long This is your approach. There's nothing wrong with it. Here's how it'll go: Shrink Windows partition, create a new partition, copy media to new partition, install Ubuntu on Windows partition. Then, you can either copy back the data into Ubuntu and expand, or leave that "data" partition there and access it through Ubuntu. For this ...


0

No at all , it is completely safe to proceed as long as you make sure all important data is passed to the newly created partition



Top 50 recent answers are included