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0

You should enter in recovery mode. Start the machine and when the BIOS passes press (hold) SHIFT. (Once the Ubuntu logo appears you have missed it. Do it again.) When Grub appears select "Advanced Options" and then select the line where you see something like "recovery mode". After while few options will appear. Select "Drop to root shell prompt". Partition ...


0

Open LibreWriter and check Tools / Options / LibreOffice / Memory if the quickstarter is enabled and uncheck it. I had such an issue.


5

If your auto started .desktop file is a script you simply can put a control echo into the script like following example: # if yyou want only data saved for one run echo "Script has run on $(date)" > ~/script.log # if you want a continous log output append if [ -e ~/script-log ] then echo "Script has run on $(date)" >> ~/script.log ...


0

If you want to either autostart or cancel autostart for any given app upon login, You can: A) go to the Dash, and open "Startup Application". Select the application you want to not autostart anymore and hit the button "Remove". or B) go to yr terminal (CTRL+ALT+T) and type: $ cd ~/.config/autostart ; ls -AF # check that you see the file ...


2

Remove it from the startup applications by searching "Startup Applications" in the Dash and unchecking Transmission.


1

Use gnome-terminal: gnome-terminal -e "python /path/to/file.py"


0

Run systemctl start lightdm to start lightdm, and by extension, the rest of the gui, when you desire. systemctl stop lightdm will shut it down.


0

On newer Ubuntu versions systemd is used and /ect/rc.local is not loaded always by default. Check if the Compatibility service is loaded with systemctl status rc-local.service If it contians active (exited) your setting seems fine and you could have another error in your /ect/rc.local file (this could be a command that fails for example)


0

You can modify the grub.cfg. It is located in /boot/grub2/grub.cfg This file is laid out in an xml format. Looking at it you can gain an intuition as to how you would like it modified. I recommend commenting out the entries you dont want by putting # at the start of all lines relevant to the entry. Because you are new to this interface, I am showing you ...


0

Method 1. Go to System Tools >> Preferences >> Startup Applications and Click "Add" Fill in the windows Name: Tomboy Notes Command: tomboy --indicator Comment: Take notes, link ideas, and stay organized Then click "Add" Method 2 Open the dash and start typing Startup Applications. When it shows up, click on it to open it. Click "Add", then continue ...


0

It depends on the app that you started. Sometimes an app has its own setting that says "Start every boot". It would help to know which app it is, as every app works differently with the system.


0

You can do it by update-rc.d 'service' defaults number where the number is an integer and the lesser the sequence number, the higher the service in the queue i.e it will be executed before other services with a greater sequence number. The above command will give the same priority for starting as well as killing the service. You can fine tune it further. ...


0

Edit /etc/fstab with sudo -e /etc/fstab and comment # line containing partition you don't want. In second column you have mountpoints. Don't touch root partition /


2

You have several choices but perhaps the easiest is to place your command exactly as you have given above in your $HOME/.xprofile file. From here it will be executed every time you login. By default this file does not exist in Ubuntu and so may need to be created manually and then be made executable. The following commands will do this: touch ...


3

User accounts normally appears as part of the System Settings (System Settings > User Accounts). To open it specifically from command line, you have to add either the command: gnome-control-center user-accounts or unity-control-center user-accounts on Ubuntu 14.04, or unity-control-center user-accounts on 15.04+ to Startup Applications.


0

A weird solution that worked for me where GParted did not, was to format it using Mac OS X's Disk Utility initially (not the file system I ultimately wanted). Then I was able to format it on Ubuntu to NTFS which is what I wanted, and didn't encounter any timeout.


0

The best solutions: 1. Ubuntu cannot open Windows files: Fully shut down Windows10 holding down the Shift key and clicking Shut-down option. 2. Ubuntu Start-up too long (5' to 10'): Before closing Ubuntu (for next time you will open it) open Terminal and type the command 'dmesg > /tmp/dmesg.txt; gedit /tmp/dmesg.txt' (without quotes). This works only once ...



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