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1

I was able to fix it by the following command. sudo pico /etc/default/grub Change GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=”" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=”text” this makes Ubuntu boot directly into Text Mode.


0

This is the only way (and incidentally, the easiest way) I could get this to work on 14.04 without a buggy install or doing a .desktop file (which I couldn't get to work). I had to install the .deb using these instructions: sudo apt-key adv --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys 5044912E sudo add-apt-repository "deb http://linux.dropbox.com/ubuntu ...


0

Another suggestion is to create executable bash script. Lets call it onboot.sh and save it in your home directory ~/onboot.sh #!/bin/bash sleep 20 echo 'cpu limit bomi player at 40%' cpulimit -v -e bomi -l 40 then make it executable by running this command chmod +x ~/onboot.sh then add this line to your ~/.bashrc ~/onboot.sh & Every ...


0

My problem is solved. I removed the file "iwlwifi.conf" with the command line : rm /etc/modprobe.d/iwlwifi.conf After restart, Ubuntu noticed me that he found an "critical error" . I've push the button "Send Report" and after 4 days an automatic update has proceed and everything works fine.


-1

You could also enter this in the terminal: crontab -e and then type this in: @reboot /path/to/script and in the script type in at the beginning this: sleep 20 and it might work fine this way.


5

A simple way of doing that is to add those lines to rc.local in your system. For that you need root or sudo rights. You can edit the file with your favourite text editor, eg vim: vim /etc/rc.local (sleep 20 echo 'cpu limit bomi player at 40%' cpulimit -v -e bomi -l 40) & The first line tells the the computer to wait 20 seconds, the other 2 lines are ...


0

A possible reason for this error is the inability to access the ISO file. For instance, if the user can list the contents of the directory containing the ISO, but not read the file itself, Startup Disk Creator will let select the file, and then fail with "Installation failed." error. It is surprising that this case was not handled by the tool, for example ...


1

Btrfs isn’t too much stable to be used as deafult file-system. Most Linux distributions, probable all, are still using ext4 as primary file-system. So, you can completely remove it from your computer. Try the given command: sudo apt-get purge btrfs-tools This command will remove btrfs-tools from your computer. You may need to wait some minutes to complete ...


1

I have had this issue with my audio volume resetting to 100% after reboot ever since I started using Linux two years ago. Basically the advice given above by GigabyteProductions is leading me to the right place, and it should really be working, but it isn't working on my system. So I had to look a little further, and I have learnt a great deal, albeit not ...


1

Due to dpb's comment, I checked my /etc/fstab file where I actually added this line of code to the /etc/fstab file: LABEL=/home /home ext4 defaults,acl 1 2 After I deleted the line and restarted it worked fine.


2

I think it's not possible without configuring sudo to let the user launch the program without a password (through /etc/sudoers and the NOPASSWD option), which can be considered like a more or less important security risk depending on the program involved. The best that can be done is to instruct sudo to restrict this to a single user, and only for that ...


0

One more option is schedule a job at boot time crontab -e Choose an editor to open the cron job file. Append the following with your script name @reboot path/to/script.sh In your case crontab -e @reboot /home/user/Documents/file.sh Make sure the script has executable permission.


0

So I have succesfully run the script using my method itself (System > Preferences > Startup Applications). These are the changes I made to my script. Added this line at the top of my script #!/bin/bash Then made executable using this command chmod u+x file.sh rebooted the system


0

This askubuntu link looks like it's got some good tips: How to run scripts on start up? I'd have asked you via comments if you'd seen this, but I don't have enough reputation to comment yet!


1

Forgive me if I'm wrong, but if /dev/sda1 is already mounted at /boot, wouldnt you get a redundant /boot in your path when you're also specifying it in the $isofile variable? I think GRUB is looking for the image in /boot/boot/, so maybe try changing to: set isofile="ubuntu-14.10-desktop-amd64.iso"


0

I solved the problem in the following way: chown -R mysql:mysql /var/lib/mysql mysql_install_db --user=mysql -ldata=/var/lib/mysql/


3

Right click on titlebar ot ThunderBird, click More Actions -> Special Application Settings -> Size & Position. Check the box to the left of Desktop, select 'Apply Initially' or 'Force' (depending on whether you might move it later) in the first dropdown, then the desktop you want in the second dropdown.


0

Here you can read this: Ubuntu 12.04+ uses a hybrid system called upstart which includes SysV runlevel specific start scripts in /etc/rc.#/ but also systemd scripts for those services which have been ported in /lib/systemd/system/. See "man 7 upstart-events" for details.


2

Very simple: restore from your last back-up the directory /home/szUserName/.config/autostart/* where szUserName is your actual user name. For more information on back-ups, please read the following Q&A: What's a good back-up strategy for 1 desktop PC? (You're definitely user type 4! ;-) >:-)


0

The startup applications GUI can be made to re-appear by removing a gnome3 ppa: $ sudo ppa-purge ppa:gnome3-team/gnome3 This hasn't had any bad effects on my 14.10 system, and the startup application re-appeared. You can also figure out the scripts in ~/.config/autostart/, and in /etc/init.d/, and use those to manage your startup programs. There is also ...


1

Ubuntu has replaced the traditional SysV init with Upstart. To somewhat stay compatible with SysV or runlevel based init, Upstart still supports the SysV traditions. You can find (and change) the default runlevel in the /etc/init/rc-sysinit.conf file. The following command will do: $ grep "env DEFAULT_RUNLEVEL" /etc/init/rc-sysinit.conf env ...



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