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I decided as follows: #!/bin/bash # # /etc/init.d/leanote . /lib/lsb/init-functions case "$1" in start) echo "Starting LEANOTE..." bash /home/keith/leanote/bin/run.sh & ;; stop) echo "Stoping LEANOTE..." pkill leanote ;; *) echo "Usage: $0 {start|stop}" exit 1 esac exit 0 Permission to run: ...


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~/.profile, /.bash_profile, and /.bash_login are better for defining the environment variables and setting up the environment, than for running scripts. I would not recommend these. /etc/rc.local can be used for that, but remember that it will start before GUI starts . Unless it is for a script that only sends notification to GUI. Note that you will need ...


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Well, working with Linux including Ubuntu can be ridiculously easy or ridiculously tough, dependent of the given hardware you use... Just give it a chance and try to figure out what is disturbing you and how to solve it, like searching for answers and asking specific questions, for example in this forum. Nobody can give you a general solution how to make ...


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If the audio-icon is not visible at the login screen, try restarting the system. I have a fresh install of Xenial, and the audio controls only show at startup on initial boot, not on subsequent logouts.


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This behavior is initiated at login and overrides the command if run at boot. To make this permanent, just add the lines below to the end of the .profile in your Home folder. # Turn off screen blanking xset s off && xset -dpms If you don't see .profile, open your Home folder in your file browser, click on 'View' and select 'Show Hidden Files'. ...


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As @Byte Commander stated, Upstart has been replaced by systemd and has been for a while now. I just used the gui tools available in Kubuntu 16.04 to set a script to run at start up. This is available via System Settings -> Startup and Shutdown -> Auto Start -> Add Script and then you just select a script file with the required commands which in my ...


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Timing issue I am pretty sure it is because of the timing. The command most likely runs before its target is "in the field". Changing the command into: /bin/bash -c "sleep 15 && dropbox stop && env DBUS_SESSION_BUS_ADDRESS="" dropbox start -i" ...will probably do the job.


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The Samsung 840 Evo had an issues that made it very slow to load older files and a new firmware was released. It fixed the slowness of my 840 Evo. Make sure your SSD has the latest firmware installed. http://www.samsung.com/semiconductor/minisite/ssd/download/tools.html


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You could try to disable NCQ by parameter before booting, as it seems to be some compatibility issue that makes the kernel to disable "queued TRIM support", as reported via Dmesg at: [ 2.344002] ata1.00: disabling queued TRIM support" Check this bug https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1591293 It seems that it takes many seconds to ...


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My recommendation would be to format the SSD and do a BACKUP of the HDD to some external drive. Then reinstall the OS completely onto your SSD without cloning. Then go to your system settings and do a backup restore from the external drive. Hope this helps!


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Ubuntu comes with a built-in Help application. Simply start typing "help" in the Dash and it'll show up.


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one possible approach would be: Create the script with just root acces (for safety sake) sudo su sudo echo 'echo "Hello world, I am `whoami`" > /tmp/test' > /path/to/script.sh sudo chmod 700 /path/to/script.sh Then change the sudoers file (according to mutliple tutorials everywhere) sudo visudo insert the following line at the end youruser ...



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