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0

Sounds like either their is a firewall blocking the connection (maybe ufw), but it is probably port forwarding that needs to be setup. To check if ufw is running sudo ufw status If the firewall is running disable the firewall as a test and try again sudo ufw disable If after the firewall is down and everything works, we just need to open up the ports ...


0

In your .ssh/config file: Host my_pc ProxyCommand ssh -a server_of_the_company -W %h:%p


3

You can do: ssh -L 2222:ip_address_of_my_pc:22 -AY myusername@server_of_the_company This will forward connections to port 2222 of localhost to port 22 of your PC. Then, to connect to your PC, you can do (from your local system): ssh -AY -p 2222 myusername_at_my_pc@localhost scp works similarly.


1

NOTE: is not an answer solving the root issue. Please provide a new answer if you think you can solve the root cause. You really have to read on why my solution is just an ugly hack. Here's an explanation on what happens at boot time, identifying the culprit. Using KDM (or LightDM) as log in manager, an X session is spawned for you upon logging in. The ...


0

Easiest way to deal with pulseaudio is to do following: Remove all pulse packages. sudo apt-get purge pulseaudio* Install all packages back again. sudo apt-get install pulseaudio*


0

You've mixed all up. ConEmu is a terminal but not a shell. git-bash is a shell. ssh is a console tool providing remote connection. (Local) terminal is a tool that just displaying output of running console applications (shells and other tools). So, it's irregularly to compare ConEmu with git-bash. They are different type of tools. What shell are you ...


2

First of all, this is possible to do. Change your ssh log level to VERBOSE and restart ssh. Usually the file is located: nano /etc/ssh/sshd_config Find LogLevel option and change it to VERBOSE. LogLevel VERBOSE Restart SSH service sudo service ssh restart; sudo service sshd restart; Reconnect to ssh and check the log file. nano ...


1

Do you need access to this host from multiple locations? Or can you use a jumpbox that has a static IP? If this is the case, you can set an iptables rule that only allows SSH access to a specific IP(s). This will give you implicit deny to anyone except the static IPs. The other recommendations would be to change the service to listen on a non-standard ...


2

I'm running the command ... in ConEmu, if that changes anything. It changes everything. That's how your terminal emulator renders the character that's send for CtrlC (End-of-text, or ETX, hexdecimal 0x03). You can try this out with printf '\x03'. Switch to another if you find it annoying, but I don't know if any emulators in Windows don't have this ...


1

Of course you will have to enter the remote password. If not, there wouldn't be any sense about passwords. Assume your user name is bill, and the other one's user is steve. Bill's password is not relevant here, steve's password is 1234, the host's ip is 10.0.0.25 Now you run ssh steve@10.0.0.25 Now it will ask you for a password, which is 1234.


0

I solved this situation. Problem was in IP address as I am using 4G mobile network and they have strange network politics.


0

On your remote host, install the open ssh and openssh-server by typing sudo apt-get install openssh openssh-server Now check if the service has been started and if not then sudo service ssh restart && sudo ps aux | grep ssh If connection is still being blocked that means you need to add the firewall rule and restart the firewall sudo ...


0

The above problem is fixed by installing Qt Creator 3.3.0. https://qt-project.org/forums/viewthread/51072/


0

You will have to enable the Port Forwarding in your High Speed Modem or Personal Router (if you have one). Log into the admin portal of your Router/HS Modem by using http://192.168.2.1 (may be 1.1 or something else as per your network range) and look for Internet Option. Setup the rule to forward the port 22 traffic to your local server. This will make ...


1

Please confirm port forwarding which was done is working. If internal machine is working fine then it will refer local ip of the machine directly to access to machine on the port 22 If external ip couldn't ssh to the machine it could be a problem with port forwarding Telnet to the your external ip and check whether it connects to your local ip machine.


1

When you use the SSH client it get the private keys from the SSH Agent. This kind of information, your computer public key, or the public keys of server where you've connected are stored in: ~/youruser/.ssh/ # Same as /home/youruser/.ssh/ When you launch the SSH client, it uses the private key from the SSH Agent, without asking for the private key ...


0

Ok, I was looking for quite some time for this and now, 5 minutes after posting the question here, one possibility pops to my head. Open multiple terminals and bin the different needed ports one after one to the same server. For instance: On terminal 1: sudo ssh <serverUser>@<server> -L 80:localhost:80 On terminal 2: sudo ssh ...


0

Try changing your sshd port to 1000+. Fail2ban helps too. For example i have some servers running sshd on 1919 or 905 and I barely get these chinese IPs trying to bruteforce my servers.


0

I found out that I could set up another SSH tunnel to my dev server and access the web pages through my local machine that way. The reason I couldn't SSH into the Windows Remote Server was because it doesn't have an SSH server available only remote desktop.


-1

As of root open /etc/passwd to edit: sudo vim /etc/passwd and change the user's name at the beginning of a line: user:x:500:501:username:home/user:/bin/bash to: newuser:x:500:501:username:home/user:/bin/bash then if you worked of root just login, and if you have been logged in to user, logoff, and relogin.


0

Maybe you should install the certificate of your server locally first? if you are using a self signed you have to configure SSH to accept it Visit https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-create-an-ssh-ca-to-validate-hosts-and-clients-with-ubuntu this was suposed to be a comment but i dont have enough rep for it.


0

screen is a command (use apt-get install screen in debian or ubuntu or yum install screen in fedora to get it if not installed-). It creates a new session and keeps that running even when your ssh connection is closed. You can reconnect by screen -x. Inside screen you can start a new session by ctrl-a c (create.) and switch betweeb sessions by ctrl-a n ...


2

You can log in to the server and start a screen (type screen. If not installed, you can get it with apt-get install screen in debian or ubuntu or yum install screen in fedora), which creates a new terminal session that can keep running even when your ssh connection is closed. Inside the screen session start your OpenVPN. You can detach the session (exit and ...


0

Problem solved by adding GSSAPIAuthentication no in /etc/ssh/ssh_config.


1

You could use scp: When you're on PCB: scp -r your_user_name@ip_address_of_PCA:/path/to/remote/directory /path/to/local/directory


2

On PC A, instead of connecting to PC B by ssh, just run rsync /path/to/local/file username@PCB:/path/to/remote/destination You could also use scp instead of rsync, with similar formatting for the rest of the line, but I prefer rsync, since it's more powerful, and (I think) verifies after copying. See man rsync for more details. N.B. that the remote ...


1

Thanks to the gurus in #snappy IRC, who figured it out. First of all, the snappy image requires a 64-bit host. My host is running 32-bit, so QEMU could load the image, but couldn't run it. Currently, no 32-bit version of Snappy Ubuntu Core is built. Had I been using a 64-bit host, a similar condition could occur if the KVM is stopped early, before or ...


1

Now Muru's excellent 100% correct answer in human speak: If you want access yourself to your own machine, sudo apt-get install ssh is all you need! If you want to allow other people into your machine, better create another (sub) directory and limit those users to that directory! ;-)


2

To establish a successful connection I had to switch [ifupdown] managed to 'true', even though all my other machines had very similar configuration settings. To quote the NetworkManager manual: If set to true, then interfaces listed in /etc/network/interfaces are managed by NetworkManager. If set to false, then any interface listed in ...


0

the trace log has a line: Pageant is running. Requesting keys. Pageant has 10 SSH-2 keys the sshd_config (on the server) has a setting MaxAuthTries which has default the value 6 so to prevent too many authentication attempts per connection, we need to lower the ssh-keys/identities comment all other Host entries, identityFiles in the ...


1

you may fix this issue on your Mac by setting by below way: setting the root password with "sudo passwd root" then editing and saving the ssh config file with "nano /etc/ssh_config" and changing the RSAAuthentication to "no" rather than yes. if you have any more issues go with this link: ...


1

The external server certainly give options but I'd like to explore direct connections first. They're faster and generally more reliable. They do however require an IP to connect and the routing at the other end to get your connection from router to server. You say you don't have these but I think you might be overlooking options. I find it hard (not ...


0

Both guides are for securing SSH access and limiting users to an SFTP-only chroot. For just SFTP access, all you need to do is: sudo apt-get install ssh Nothing more.


3

Yes, use SSH client configuration. Easiest way is to create a local user configuration in ~/.ssh/config with these two lines: Host * User ctote This matches all hosts and applies the login name ctote to it. To apply/override it for a single host you connect to ofen, use for example: Host myhost User myusername Hostname ...


2

Sure, you can create a ~/.ssh/config file and in that: Host laptop User another-user You can specify most SSH options through host-matched options like this.


0

I'd recommend using key based authentication along with a passphrase with SSH for security instead of the complicated iptables setup you are using. Just allow port 22 and your server will still be safe. http://tombuntu.com/index.php/2008/02/20/public-key-authentication-for-ssh-made-easy/ It is going to be difficult to craft the firewall rules in such a way ...


0

You can set up a DHCP server on the network and use that to resolve hostnames, eg https://wiki.ubuntu.com/DHCPv6 Many home routers can serve DHCP. You could also use the /etc/hosts file to name IP addresses, but this will only work on a computer where you configure the /etc/hosts file.


0

So, I re-commissioned all of my servers, cleared out the .juju directory, except for my environments.yaml and I still get "TLS handshake failed: x509: certificate signed by unknown authority (possibly because of "crypto/rsa: verification error" while trying to verify candidate authority certificate "juju-generated CA for environment \"maas\"")". What more ...


0

The problem appears to have been caused by the physical clocks being not in sync enough with the server and critical parts of the commissioning happen before they run ntpdate. I installed 3 commissioning files to sync ntpdate andd the hardware clock. 01-ntpdate - sync's with ntpdate and then writes to the hardware clock #!/bin/sh /usr/sbin/ntpdate -v ...


0

Very strange indeed. You could try several alternatives: sudo ping -f 10.1.10.197 to send a lot of ICMPs packages. This write a dot while sending a packet and remove it when receive a response (pong). If your screen start writing a lots of dots is because packets get dropped somewhere in the middle. mtr 10.1.10.197 is traceroute with steroids. arp-scan -t ...


0

Did you purchase an SSL certificate from GoDaddy and then read tutorials on how to install it for your particular server? It seems like you altogether did not install the SSL certificate properly.


0

The question is not 100% clear, sorry. I assume that: - You have sublime working at your machine; - You want to save and open files that are on another machine - You can access files at that machine. That is done via usual Nautilus / gnome shell, Places - "Connect to Server..." - type ssh://name@server/path This recipe is from ...


0

Ok, with help, I solved my own problem. First off, for reasons unknown to me, trying to ssh into a server on the same network as the client causes the "reset by peer" issue. Which is why using a proxy, or using the server's local IP (192.168.1.4) resolves the issue. Secondly, to solve the issue of someone trying to guess my password which I seem to see ...


0

Sounds like port 22 is blocked. Depending on where you are running your server from there are several options. The first is accessing your router and unblocking port 22. You could also try running ssh from port 80. ssh -p 80 myserver.net btw, what kind of address are you using to access your server? If you are using an IP address make sure you are not ...


1

You must setup root password: sudo passwd Then restart the ssh service: sudo service ssh reload Note: permitting root access especially without password is quite dangerous it makes your system highly vulnerable to external threats.


0

This answer is based on the tip Rmano gave at the end of his answer, even though the file access control list method didn't work. It didn't work, because the full path, e.g. /path/to/dir requires at least read+execute permission: sudo chmod -R g+rx /path. This solved my issue, and I can now access the symbolic link in A's home directory, and write to the ...


0

This is really more of a job for scp, which is a file copy over ssh: scp <user>@<remote-host>:/remote/computer/file/location/* /local/computer/some/location/ then, on the local host, just: gzip /local/computer/some/location/* since gzip will automatically detect and ignore files that already have a .gz suffix.


0

I am not expert here, But in my suggestion, please try to use this tutorial: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SSH/OpenSSH/Keys


0

You are unlikely to have firewall issues. "Connection Reset" means that the connection has been established but then the server didn't like either its configuration or the client. To verify whether this is the case call ssh -v user@server. If you see debug1: Connection established. then your firewall rules are just fine and you should focus on your ssh ...


0

Perhaps I'm missing something, but nowhere in your question do I see a "remote" IP address. I only see 192.168.x.x, which is only available inside your lan. If you want to connect from outside the lan, you need to use an external (public) address, which is the real address as seen from the outside. If it's a dynamic address, you either need to make sure it ...



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