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0

Install Ubuntu SDK and click "Open SSH connection do the device" in the devices panel. Bonus: you won't resist to writing a new Scope...


0

I plugged a monitor into the Ubuntu Server (it runs the Desktop version of Ubuntu 14, I believe) and upon logging in saw a message asking me to create a passphrase. I clicked on it and hit enter (for a blank passphrase). After that, I rebooted and password-less SSH logins seemed to work again. Before I mark this as complete, I will give this a few days of ...


0

There is lots of way to do that, here is my suggested solution: First of all, storing your password in a variable is give you more flexible commands. sshpass has an option for that: -e: this option allows to read password from $SSHPASS environment variable You have two way to set this variable: Set directly in your code: export SSHPASS='your_pass' Or ...


0

To activate ssh access entirely over wifi, without developer mode on the phone, without any special tooling on your computer and without using USB: If you don't already have an ssh keypair, type ssh-keygen on your computer and follow the instructions to generate one. Install the Terminal app on the phone from the App Store. Open a Terminal and type (this ...


0

You can use another method: Install ubuntu-sdk (ppa:ubuntu-sdk-team/ppa), put your phone in developer mode, open ubuntu-sdk, connect your device to computer, go to devices in ubuntu-sdk and in control, exec open ssh session. And then you can copy your keys, etc, witouth using adb.


0

In order to redeem my reputation, I did some more research and tried a few things with my server. After doing the following I no longer get the error message and my server seems to be behaving normally. I used this page SystemdForUpstartUsers for guidance. What it did I have not clue, but it seems to work. I have a feeling that Upstart and Systemd are ...


0

to pinpoint the source of the problem, try to setup passwordless login for localhost on the server. This way, you deal with only one machine, the server. If it does work, the problem is caused by the client(s); if it doesn't, you'll have to figure out what's wrong with the server itself


0

What is the output of dpkg -L phablet-tools? it should show you all the files installed by that package, and on my machine I can definitely see /usr/bin/phablet-shell among them. I had a few issues to be able to connect afterwards, here's what I did: Enable the developer mode on the phone (phablet-shell won't complain that it cannot connect, so it was a ...


0

Have you tried to add the home path here : Home /var/www/ Download 0 Upload 0 StayAtHome true VirtualChroot true LimitConnectionByUser 10 LimitConnectionByIP 10 IdleTimeOut 300 HideNoAccess true Tell me if that works.


0

Using ssh-keygen -R hostname will not always work. If you have a newer version of SSH that is "hiding" the hostnames to prevent ssh-agent hijacking, apparently ssh-keygen is unable to unhash the hostname. For example, I have a host called build-node-01 and I have connected to it and accepted the key. I then rebuild it from scratch, getting a new host ...


0

I tried this and it worked do-release-upgrade -d You'll go to the development version with the "-d" switch. With this specific server I started with 14.04, then did a "do-release-upgrade" which upgrade me to 14.10. This is when I started to have this same error message. So I found After update to Ubuntu 14.10... and decided to attempt this. I was then ...


3

sudo ssh-keygen -f /etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key -N 'myverylongpasswordhere' -b 4096 -t rsa recreates me the keys. but, after restarting the server, i recieve could not load host key: /etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key You create a hostkey with a password. Is there any customization to unlock that hostkey? If not, then I think that is what is to be expected: ...


2

Simply ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 4096 ssh-keygen generate the ssh key and -t Specify type of key to create. -b Number of bits in the key to create, which in this case 4096 You could have find this easily with small Google search.


-1

This command should do it: sudo chmod +s /usr/lib/policykit-1/polkit-agent-helper-1 I had this problem when I moronically changed the owner of /usr/lib recursively.


0

Also, set up a local ntp server, and in /etc/maas/preseeds/preseed-master look for: d-I clock-setup/ntp-server string ntp.ubuntu.com and change ntp.ubuntu.com to your ntp server's IP or machine name.


0

This is definitely the wrong place for this question. If you're concerned about the security of RSA, you might want to learn more about it, learn the math, or study openssh's implementation (http://cvsweb.openbsd.org/cgi-bin/cvsweb/src/usr.bin/ssh/). This is much better than speculation. Unlike with DES or AES, the idea of a "Backdoor" in RSA doesn't make ...


0

If you have root access to Server A, you should install an sshd daemon on it and then open the correct ports on the firewall of server A and then mount the appropriate share on the HPC cluster using sshfs. If you have no root access to server A, then the security design of your environment is what you have and there is nothing you can do...


1

You can try nc (netcat) to send/receive any messages (files too) over the network. For example the computer A has IP address 192.168.1.10 and computer B has IP address 192.168.1.20. At first open a port on computer A to which the computer B will connect to: $ nc -l 2000 Now Computer A will listen for incoming connections on port 2000, you should use any ...


0

As bodhi.zazen mentions, root log in from ssh might be disabled. Honestly, this is not a bad thing. You might want to consider getting used to having to "su -" to root if you have to (or sudo -i if you use it). Try the following to check, grep PermitRootLogin /etc/ssh/sshd_config If you see the following come by, root login is disabled. ...


0

You could create a Desktop Shortcut File and place them on $HOME/.local/share/applications/ your keyring will still manage the passwords so no plain text passwords. Bellow is the file content. Name it what_ever_you_like.desktop and add execution permission, place it in the above path for easy menu access. For SSH terminal aliases are probably better. ...


1

For file transport: I'd recommend (Open)VPN for client connections with password and certificates. A secure tunnel is a must for delicate data like this. If I where you, I'd put something like a pfsense in front of that (a GW-Application, it also contains OpenVPN). At least put an iptables Firewall on the server itself, both would be even better. On top ...


0

One simple way is to mount your remote SSH server with your File Manager, which is Nautilus by default in Ubuntu. To do so, open any directory (go to Home for example), and enter your remote server in Address Bar (press Ctrl+L to edit current location). Type-in desired address with this format: sftp://username@server.example.com:22/home/username After ...


2

Try this Settings for /etc/ssh/sshd_config Subsystem sftp internal-sftp -f AUTH -l VERBOSE UsePAM yes Match group sftp ChrootDirectory %h ForceCommand internal-sftp AllowTcpForwarding no create group sftp: groupadd sftp Create directory sudo mkdir /ftpusers sudo mkdir /ftpusers/HomeFolder Create user directly with new sftp group attached: ...


11

With the official final release Ubuntu for Phones ships the "android-gadget-service" tool with which you can manage adb, mtp, USB tethering and ssh. Connect your device via USB, enable Developer Mode in: "System-Settings->About This Phone->Developer Mode" ...and run (from your PC, make sure to have the phone screen unlocked, else adb will refuse to let ...


0

SSH is started using Upstart, and uses Upstart's respawn option to restart it when the process dies. Therefore you can try detecting when the SSH job has hit the respawn limit, and overwrite the configuration with a known-good one. For example: # cat /etc/init/ssh-safe.conf start on stopped ssh RESULT="failed" PROCESS="respawn" script cp ...


0

I believe the method you already use is the only one that's really working. The main problem is that if the ssh daemon config is failing how is the server supposed to know that it is failing? In theory you can write a script that replaces the faulty config with a correct backup version but this is only useful if the server can detect the configuration is ...


1

It seems like your second Ubuntu box has received an external IP address for some (uncertain to me) reasons. And in this case it's not surprising that ssh to your other PCs doesn't work - without port forwarding set up on the router it can't reach the machines which are in the local subnet. Unfortunately, some important details are missing, especially this: ...


0

I'd first check /etc/hosts.deny to make sure nothing has actually been blacklisted directly here. Otherwise, if iptables is installed, check it hasn't blacklisted something with iptables -L INPUT -v -n. You can try whitelisting the relevant IP too (see this question). Considering you can SSH into them from home or from other servers, if you can't solve ...


2

You need to escape spaces in both local shell and remote shell. Try this: rsync -avz '/path with spaces/' 'user@remotelocation:/media/another\ path\ with/spaces/' The source, /path with spaces/ in the local shell can be escaped only via putting single quotes around it i.e. '/path with spaces/'. On the other hand in case of the destination, the local ...


0

As a legacy to my Monday clumsiness, the answer is as dumb as : The command ssh-keygen -t rsa -C "<email address>" asks for a passphrase. If a value is set, that passphrase is the value that must be entered to "unlock" the key. Now facepalm, everybody!


2

knockd may be your answer. Server part: Install knockd --> sudo apt-get install knockd Edit configuration file --> sudo nano /etc/knockd.conf also you can use gedit or vi. The configuration file should look like this after the edit: [options] LogFile = /var/log/knockd.log Interface = wlan0 [sendMessage] sequence = ...


0

Try this Stop the server sudo service ssh stop backup existing file sudo mv /etc/ssh/sshd_config ~/Desktop/ create new file sudo vi /etc/ssh/sshd_config with contents copied from http://mixeduperic.com/downloads/org-files/ubuntu/etcsshsshdconfig-ubuntu-12041-default-file.html Check if everything is commented in you /etc/ssh/ssh_config except these 4 line ...


1

You can use an svn changelist to keep track of a set of files that you want to commit together. The linked page goes into lots of details, but here's an executive summary example: $ svn changelist my-changelist mydir/dir1/file1.c mydir/dir2/myfile1.h $ svn changelist my-changelist mydir/dir3/myfile3.c etc. ... (add all the files you want to commit together ...


1

Here is a (brute force) workaround. This does NOT require you to set the number of CPUs to 1. Add the following to your init.el (your emacs settings): (add-hook 'isearch-update-post-hook 'redraw-display)


0

@jpetazzo has an awesome post about this subject: http://goo.gl/fmYfI4. The short answer would be to use nsenter: PID=$(docker inspect --format {{.State.Pid}} <container_name_or_ID>) nsenter --target $PID --mount --uts --ipc --net --pid P.S.: Don't forget to check the discussion in the comments of the post... Cheers


0

See https://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bashref.html#Bash-Startup-Files When Bash is invoked as an interactive login shell, or as a non-interactive shell with the --login option, it first reads and executes commands from the file /etc/profile, if that file exists. After reading that file, it looks for ~/.bash_profile, ~/.bash_login, and ~/.profile, ...


0

In Ubuntu bash login works the same as in other Distros. Once you add the alias in your .bashrc like you did using: alias ls='ls --color=always -ragX' To have ls running automatically every time you log in you can simply add it to the last line of your .bashrc file. If you do not see the output of ls or ls --color=always -ragX at login there is probably ...


0

As muru did already say there should per default (after first login) be a .bashrc in your home directory /home/youloginname To protect your existing bashrc please create a copy with the following command. cp ~/.bashrc ~/mybashrc.backup After this you can restore the default .bashrc , to do this remove first the existing one and then copy it over from the ...


0

A few things to note: .bashrc files don't "run", so if you look in a list of processes, you won't see it anywhere, and that's fine. bash reads the bashrc file when it starts up, so if you make changes to your bashrc file, they won't take effect until the next time you run bash. When you're testing edits to your bashrc file, you can easily see the changes ...


0

We were already using the right type of key (ppk instead of pem).. In our case, it was a problem with the file permissions for authorized_keys on the server user folder. It has to be -rw-r--r-- ... It was -rw-rw-r-- ssh is very finicky about file perms.


0

maybe you should try changing the ownership first and then try to manipulate the chmod How about sudo chown [yourusername] file.pem and then chmod


0

It's in the nature of sudo to require typing in the password at login and after the password cache expired. If you keep your sudo password in an unencrypted text file (and even in an encrypted it's a bad idea) and want to manage it with kdewallet you don't have to worry about sudo -i because it's a much more secure alternative for your use case. Ah, and ...


3

You must append the contents of $HOME/.ssh/id_rsa.pub to the other server's $HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys. Luckily, there is a binary for that; ssh-copy-id. Its usage is simple: ssh-copy-id -i .ssh/id_rsa.pub <user>@<remote.server>


0

You can make this command to execute every time you boot your system using the 'Startup Applications' that is available by default in ubuntu. Just type 'Startup Applications' in the dash board. An application will open. Click Add button in the application and type the command (In your case, its chmod 0700 ~/.ssh) and u can also specify the Name and Comment ...


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The server credentials —that make up the "fingerprint" SSH clients bleat on about if they are incorrect— are actually just keypairs defined in /etc/ssh/sshd_config: # HostKeys for protocol version 2 HostKey /etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key HostKey /etc/ssh/ssh_host_dsa_key HostKey /etc/ssh/ssh_host_ecdsa_key HostKey /etc/ssh/ssh_host_ed25519_key Copy these files ...


0

Acronyms IN point is Router OUT/Target resource is Rpi N LB - Load Balancer To be clear As for the start, the think that you can't connect to RPi from outside doesn't mean that internet is not accessible from RPi itself. So it is "bad" check. You could connect easy to RPi from LB, just ssh in to LB, and from LB ssh to any RPi you want. Now about more ...


0

If you use an OpenWRT/Tomato based router, a shell script I wrote that runs on the router and wakes up any PC that's receiving an incoming SSH connection, might be of use to you.


0

It would be simplest to purge and reinstall openssh-server. If not, you can extract it from the postinst script. sed '1,/EOF/d; /EOF/,$d' /var/lib/dpkg/info/openssh-server.postinst > /etc/ssh/sshd_config


3

From our extensive chat session: Your setup is / was suffering from: Troubles with your router not forwarding as expected; Hackers attempting to break-in via the existing, and working, port 22 forward to your load balancer computer; ufw being enabled, getting in the way of the suggested iptables script. Access method 1: Chaining SSH sessions: Create an ssh ...


1

Umm, pretty simple, eh? Open putty and establish your connection to the VPS. You gotta use a text editor such as nano to edit sources.list. Run this command: sudo nano /etc/apt/sources.list Then navigate to the end the file (a new line maybe) and keep Putty window open of course. Simply copy the repository addresses you want to add to sources.list file ...



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