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3

Most likely to identify who created the key. It is just a comment. But as said at 1: probably so you know you created it. Useful when more than 1 administrator is administrating the system. Yes, you can add anything in place of your e-mail. And since it is the last part of it you do not have to use anything special for spaces etc. Extra: ssh-keygen -c to ...


3

Most probably you are using key stored in some non-standard location and added to your gnome-keyring. Using ssh -A santhosh@localhost will forward the connection to your agent and you will be able to use the same identity withing ssh session. Other way would be to specify the identity file in your ~/.ssh/config: Host github.com IdentityFile path/to/key


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In this case, it seem that spawn refers to the spawn extension to the hosts.allow syntax, as described in the RUNNING OTHER COMMANDS section of the hosts_options (5) man page (man hosts_options): RUNNING OTHER COMMANDS aclexec shell_command Execute, in a child process, the specified shell command, after performing the %<...


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spawn is expect specific command i.e. you need to interpret spawn using expect. Most of the time you would use a expect script and use spawn inside it to start a new process. For example: #!/usr/bin/expect -f spawn ssh host expect .... From terminal directly: % expect -c 'spawn whoami' spawn whoami By default spawn echoes the command hence the output ...


2

ssh -Q cipher reports the ciphers supported by the ssh client, not the server. One way to verify that you have successfully removed the cipher foo from the server configuration is to explicitly use it for your connection: ssh -oCiphers=foo localhost relevant excerpt from ssh.c option processing: case 'Q': cp = NULL; ...


2

While ssh is not the same as Samba, and therefore it was likely that you failed, you can do a cifs-mount for a Samba-shared directory: create a folder in your (Johnny's) home dir e.g. mkdir univerity_space then connect via sudo /bin/mount -t cifs -o user=UNIVERSITY_USERNAME,uid=1000,gid=1000 //foo.bar.com/user /home/johnny_johnson/university_space check ...


2

If the server provides you with Samba shares, that doesn't mean that it is allowing console SSH connections, or provides any other service and/or functionality. Samba server has its own user database (it might be synchronized with system). Samba network protocol doesn't carry the Linux file permissions. You should ask your server administrators about ...


1

Add entries to ~/.ssh/config (for a specific user) or /etc/ssh/ssh_config (for all users) as Host prodService Hostname prodService.xyz.pdr.abc.com ... other options for this host...


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According to Google's site, here are the steps to install gcloud on Debian based systems You may need to install curl sudo apt-get install curl Create an environment variable for the correct distribution export CLOUD_SDK_REPO="cloud-sdk-$(lsb_release -c -s)" Add the Cloud SDK distribution URI as a package source echo "deb http://packages.cloud....


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A similar question was asked that might answer your question: Consider using a ForceCommand directive in sshd_config. For example, I use these to force groups of users to a set of servers: Match Group group1 ForceCommand ssh -t group1.fqdn Match Group="*,!local,!group2,!root" ForceCommand ssh -t group3.fqdn You could use: Match ...



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