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Well bcache is an option on 14.04. dm-cache (for which lvmcache is apparently just a friendly frontend) seems faster according to benchmarks but seems quite painful to use directly. That should still be an option if you like, but it's a slog. You could manually update (or find a PPA for) lvm2. This package is largely just a toolchain for exploiting Kernel ...


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You can install GRUB to your SSD using the command sudo grub-install /dev/sdb.


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Your SSD is considered "removable media" by UEFI, so the place for the bootloader which UEFI runs is actually /EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi from the SSD's EFI partition. You might have to copy the Ubuntu bootloader(s) from /EFI/ubuntu there and rename them to bootx64.efi. If you are running secure boot, copy /EFI/ubuntu/shimx64.efi to /EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi and ...


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You don't need to make any partitions on the HDD, just leave some empty space before starting the installer. What probably happened is that you selected you HDD to install on and it had no free space available and it asked if you wanted to use the whole drive. You probably mist this and clicked next.


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When you installing Ubuntu, don't select "Install It alongside Windows 7". Look at the last line, you will see "Something else", select It and now, you can see partitions in your HDD. Select partition you want and click "Install now".


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Answered by OP in original question: Finally got it to work! I am not quite sure what does it, but after installing Gummiboot AND updating Grub2 it suddenly started to recognize my .efi files. According to efibootmgr I now have three entries: BootCurrent: 0001 Timeout: 1 seconds BootOrder: 0001,0004,0005 Boot0001* UEFI: ADATA SX900 Boot0004 ...


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For quick booting, you would want it to boot from the SSD. Usually /boot is 300 to 500MB, put this on the SSD at the beginning. I normally suggest / (root) of 20 or 25GB also on the SSD (After the /boot). Now you can add /home or data partition(s) onto the 2TB drive. Hope this helps


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Slightly different suggestion. Not necessarily better. Each user has to decide how he will use system. I prefer to have / (root) on SSD but not a separate /boot or any other system partitions. And I leave /home inside root so the user settings are also on the faster drive. But then create data partition(s) on rotating drive for all data and link data back ...


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You will have two options to Chose when you are going through the install You can encrypt the entire drive and at boot it will require a password at each boot in order to work and will then proceed to boot normally. this is the most secure way to lock down your PC you can just encrypt your Home folder where you store documents and pictures and other files. ...



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