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6

LVM on LUKS on bcache Here the russian doll game is a little deeper with 3 stacks/layers... My initial idea about this question was to use a default Ubuntu install with LVM on LUKS and convert it into a bcache backing device with blocks but it did not work for me on my test with LVM. Moreover, the ubuntu installer (ubiquity) is too limited to install ...


4

You would not notice any difference unless you ran out of RAM. At that point, there would be a monumental slowdown no matter if you used SSD or HDD. (Unless you have one of those fancy PCI-SSD things that are new from Intel.) However, if you plan on hibernating your computer, then there would be a slightly faster performance increase on the SSD. When ...


3

If the two drives have the same size, cloning the source drive to the target drive using dd will have the exact same impact a full write of the target disk would have. Before even starting to consider whether this is a problem or not, if you need everything you have already on the old drive and this is "full enough", there shouldn't even be more ...


2

I installed a disk caddy with a PATA/SATA interface, and had booting problems -- grub would freeze up when accessing the disk. The disk worked fine as a disk, but when present, grub would freeze when accessing it in any way, even just tab completion on the grub command line! My BIOS did not allow selecting which disk to have first in boot order, and the ...


2

LVM on LUKS + LUKS/dm-cache The Ubuntu installer uses the LVM on LUKS configuration for it's full disk encryption. If you want to also use dm-cache / lvmcache to boost performance, you will need to place your cache pool into an encrypted volume to maintain the security of your data. The steps are Create a LUKS volume on the target block device Extend ...


1

This behaviour makes sense to me. In order for a new filesystem to be usable, certain things have to be written so that it can, for example, store the locations of files. This is what gets done during a format. So why give you a checkbox at all? I'd say that's only really applicable for old, pre-existing filesystems that are already structurally complete. ...


1

eCryptfs doesn't encrypt an entire partition like LUKS/dm-crypt does, your home is stored (encrypted) in a regular folder, apparently somewhere on your sda1 root partition in your case. Making a regular backup of your home while you're logged in (and it's mounted/decrypted) would be a good method to migrate it to another location (keeping the backup copy ...


1

There is a good chance to move all the data using LVM tools. There is short info on how to do it: Get USB connector for your SSD disk and attach it to your laptop with SSD connected Repartition your devices same way as your current disk (actually doesn't matter how, but your new LUSK partition should be same or bigger than your current LUKS partition Copy ...


1

It depends on how much Windows needs and we can't answer that here. Ubuntu / can be as small as 10 Gb. If you add 5 Gb for a /home/ and do not create a different partition and do not use that /home/ but put the directories inside it onto the 2nd hard disk you will have more than enough with 15Gb. From Ubuntu's view you can do /dev/sda1 mount as NTFS for ...


1

Yes. You can just unplug your windows hard drive and install it as your "only" operating system on the other drive. Follow any installation guide you want. With both drives plugged in, you will be able to select which drive to boot from using the BIOS. It might also be possible to use GRUB, but with separate drives it would probably be more trouble than ...


1

Read Only is the state that recovery mode boots into intentionally. What you need to do is remount the root partition with read-write privileges. This will remount the drive as readable and writable. Execute this in the recovery console: mount -rw -o remount /


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There is no way to stop the root user (sudo) from doing all and everything with drives attached to our computer. This includes deleting files, formatting partitions, and partitioning drives. There are means to protect files on a partition from being accidentally overwritten by mounting it as read-only in Ubuntu but this alone will of course not stop ...


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Since you are installing on separate SSD's, it shouldn't really matter. However, I HIGHLY recommend disconnecting the SSD (and all other hard drives) from your motherboard that you are NOT going to currently install anything on, it will drastically decrease your chances of error.


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Windows will try it's best to nuke grub if you install it after Ubuntu. Install Ubuntu after Windows https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WindowsDualBoot A Windows OS should be installed first, because its bootloader is very particular and the installer tends to overwrite the entire hard drive, wiping out any data stored on it. If Windows isn't already ...


1

Mounting with discard is not very good, because it affects performance, if you delete many files. Swap is always trimmed automatically, as far as I know. You can setup trim as you like in crontabs. In Ubuntu it is set by default to once a week.



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