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Depending on how much RAM your system has, you can get away with using very little swap, and even then, your computer will only use swap when it runs out of space in RAM. Obviously, writing to the SSD will shorten its lifespan, but as long as you avoid using utilities that make many small writes (like defragmentation) you should be fine. Hibernate works by ...


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Early SSDs had a reputation for failing after fewer writes than HDDs. If the swap was used often, then the SSD may fail sooner. This might be why you heard it could be bad to use an SSD for swap. Modern SSDs don't have this issue, and they should not fail any faster than a comparable HDD. Placing swap on an SSD will result in better performance than placing ...


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Still today Flash RAM cells built in SSDs have a limited lifespan. Every write (not read) cycle or better every erasure wears a memory cell and at some time it will stop working. The amount of erase cycles a cell can survive is highly variable, and flash from modern SSDs will do much better than some years ago. In addition the intelligent firmware will take ...


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HDD technology uses a magnetic process for data manipulation and storage. This process is noninvasive, meaning you can pretty much manipulate data on a disk drive infinitely. That is until the mechanics start to fail. In contrast SSD technology does not run the risk of mechanical failure. But what is a concern is how it stores it's data. For data storage ...


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Concerns about swap on SSDs are unfounded. They can handle a good 10,000 writes, so to wear out a 500 GB SSD you would have to write 100 MB / second to it every second for for 578 days. There is no way you are going to manage to keep it constantly swapping that much for that long, and certainly writing 1-2 gb for hibernation once or twice a day is not ...


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You should find a /etc/cron.weekly/fstrim that calls /sbin/fstrim-all. It should be calling trim on your RAID, but the way to know for sure is to call 'sh -x /sbin/fstrim-all' and see what it does.


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No, this will not work… The built-in back-up does a data backup, not a system back-up… The easiest way to do what you ask is to: Download the CloneZilla LiveCD and burn it. Edit your fstab and get rid of all the UIDs and change them back to /dev/XdY (where X and Y are the original drive locations, probably s and a respectively. Put the SSD in an ...


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Clone the HDD using CloneZilla http://clonezilla.org/show-live-doc-content.php?topic=clonezilla-live/doc/03_Disk_to_disk_clone, then run gparted to resize the disk. To resize a partition: 1.- Select a partition. 2.- Choose: Partition → Resize/Move 3.- Adjust the size of the disk. 4.- Click Resize/Move.


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On this page http://lwn.net/Articles/408428/ via this page http://stackoverflow.com/questions/20372544/what-is-the-significance-of-queue-rotational-in-linux It says that there's a kernel parameter you can pass to set it. You'll have to figure out which one though. Once you do, edit /etc/default/grub accordingly. FWIW, it's not the end of the world if ...


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I have almost same parameters. I placed / and swap on ssd and no separate /home. There is not enough space on SSD to waste it on having half-empty / partition. I symlinked large directories to HDD. I use very fast hybernation from SSD. I did not place /home on HDD because in Ubuntu there are very many small configuration files stored in hidden ...



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