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SSDs do not change the situation regarding swap space (at least, not much). You technically do not require swap space, but it is recommended to have some, depending on your usage. Red Hat recommends that you have 4GB of swap for your amount of RAM, and 8GB if you intend to allow hibernation.


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Your partitioning idea is good 18 GB for / , 2 GB for swap in SSD and 200 GB for /home. You can make a partition for user apps as much as you wish (say 100 GB) and mount it at /usr. This custom partition scheme can be done by choosing "Something else" in Installation Type


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Yes, it's definitely possible and the Ubuntu installer allows it when choosing the option "something else". Just plan the partition layout of both drives accordingly. You can create the partitions beforehand with GParted, if you feel more comfortable with that tool. In my personal experience, the Windows installer doesn't like some partitioning schemes ...


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All of your files will be save in your /home directory. One great thing about linux is that any folder in in the directory tree can be on an separate drive rather than on the same drives as the root directory. So to have your files on your HDD and your documents on your SDD you need to mount your HDD at \home when you boot. The easiest way to do this is to ...


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If your SSD supports it, use the ATA Secure Erase command; assuming that your drive is /dev/sda: Boot Ubuntu from a Live DVD Open a Terminal with Ctrl+Alt+t Check that your drive is not frozen: hdparm -I /dev/sda (look for the frozen or not frozen line) If your device is frozen, you can try: Suspend and resume Hot replug the SATA cable (i.e. with the ...


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Note that ps (on my Ubuntu 14.04.2) shows "kswapd" as: root 39 2 0 Mar23 ? 00:03:27 [kswapd0] The "[]" surrounding the process name indicates that kswapd0 is a portion of the kernel code that, for system convenience, is running as a process. kswapd not only manages swapping, it also manages the flow of memory among buffers, ...


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The Ubuntu installer will recognize the drive as long as it's properly connected. You can build the necessary partitions to run Ubuntu fully on the SSD. So you don't have to do anything in Windows as long as it's properly connected. I have a similar setup but on a tower PC. Be aware that you have to create some 4 different partitions on that SSD for the ...



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