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5

Sounds like the connection might be maxing it out. You say it's an older computer so it likely has IDE or sata 1 which means 150 MBs is the best you could expect mathematically. Remember sata 1 is 1.5GBs raw, but only 150mbs usable, sata 2 is 3GBs raw 300mbs usable, and sata 3 is 6GBs raw 600MBs usable. Real world you're exactly where you should be for ...


5

Provided your computer supports booting from usb, yes you can to an ssd. If haven't booted from usb before you should try before purchasing. Install unetbootin, create the live-usb, and the reboot the computer and press the appropriate F# key (varies from system to system) to enter either your BIOS, or your quick-boot menu. If you enter the quick-boot ...


4

I have a 128GB SSD. I have 20 GB for / which I really need (running both Gnome and Unity and a bunch of games, several db servers, etc.) In your case I would put both / and /home on the SSD, but I would put the individual large folders as projects, videos, and pictures on the HDD. The advantage of keeping all your documents on the SSD is that they open in ...


4

Processor, memory and video cards have major impact on UI responsiveness, an SSD will only improve boot speed and program launch times. A better solution would be to use a lighter DE, like XFCE.


3

Yup, as long as your laptop supports booting from usb devices you install from usb to an ssd, hard drive, or even another usb device; storage is storage.


2

Should be able to fine. I've never installed on laptop but several on desktop.


2

Copy the contents of your Videos folder to a folder called Videos on your HDD, let's say /mnt/hdd1/Videos. Open a terminal and type mv ~/Videos ~/Videos.old. Type ln -s /mnt/hdd1/Videos/ ~/. This will create a link from that Videos folder in your HDD into your home directory (which is on the SSD). If you're on Ubuntu 14.04, I believe "Nautilus" will ...


2

I'm running a similar system at home. I've got a 256 GB SSD with ~ 90 GB allocated to linux. Even with a 15 GB game on the SSD, I've still got a lot of space left over. So basically, you probably don't need /home to be on a separate HDD. /tmp you can likely just leave on your SSD without giving it its own partition. /tmp is cleared on every reboot. Giving ...


1

Easiest thing to do, if you can some how plug in your new hard drive at the same time the old one is plugged in: 1) Boot into a liveCD or liveUSB of a linux distro (any distro!) 2) Identify which /dev/sdX each one is (your 256 is likely /dev/sdb and the 512 will be /dev/sdX where x can be b, c, d...) Check out gparted and see what you see on the top right ...


1

It is adviced to make TWO backups. 1 for / and 1 for /home if they are on different partition. If you want one you will have to add a lot of exceptions to that one command. Example: sudo su cd / tar -cvpzf backup.tar.gz --exclude=/backup.tar.gz --one-file-system / tar -cvpzf backuphome.tar.gz --one-file-system /home/ will backup your root and exclude ALL ...



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