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21

Dude, where's my root? First of all we need to know on what disk your root filesystem is located ( in other words , what device houses your Ubuntu. One way is with df. $ df / -h Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/sda1 110G 58G 48G 55% / Great ! I now ...


15

A simple way to tell if your OS is installed on SSD or not is to run a command from a terminal window called lsblk -o name,rota. Look at the ROTA column of the output and there you will see numbers. A 0 means no rotation speed or SSD drive. A 1 would indicate a drive with platters that rotate. My Ubuntu is installed on my /dev/sdb drive, so we can see ...


3

EDIT: Children in bed, now here comes the extended edition. SWAP (do you need it?) Well, basically you don't. BUT, if you got none, you really have to make sure that your 32GB of RAM is enough for the summed up RAM consumption of all running processes. If you don't the kernel will kill processes at its own gusto. Why are there two SWAP partitions? This ...


2

I have the same one and I wanted to update, but it's already the latest firmware. You should update SSD firmware regardless of the OS; it does wonders for the drive and keeps its life-span stable, controls writing and reading, eliminates bugs and improves performance. To upgrade it, use the Intel® SSD Firmware Update Tool, which is independent from the OS, ...


2

Currently there's no way to securely erase files on SSD without erasing the content of the whole drive or access to the firmware of the SSD. It's impossible to know where the SSD may store previous copies of a logical block. To make matters worse, due to journalling and copy-on-write mechanisms of the file system it may be impossible to know which logical ...


2

My recommendation would be to format the SSD and do a BACKUP of the HDD to some external drive. Then reinstall the OS completely onto your SSD without cloning. Then go to your system settings and do a backup restore from the external drive. Hope this helps!


1

Most important things first: Backups should always be stored in another place than the system they were created from. Transfer them to your local box or a backup space or even some cloud storage like box.com or Dropbox or similar. Now to the discs: Both discs are in a raid setup. This allows the system to work even if one of the discs fails. It is not a ...


1

I think you're getting the "out of space" message because the Live USB stores all your files (including Steam and any other programs that you installed previously) in RAM, and your computer is running out of space in RAM! Try rebooting (which will reset everything and free up your RAM), and boot into the Ubuntu USB installer and start the installation ...


1

In the end your question isn't really a Ubuntu question. You have a Hard Drive with a small, relative to the size of the HD, amount of flash storage. This is managed automatically for you by the drive and tries to place the more frequently accessed files on the Flash portion rather than the HD portion. As far as I know there is no way to control or tell what ...


1

All you should need to do is install a 32-bit version of Ubuntu to the SSD using your other computer; after that, once the drive is transferred to the neighbor's laptop, chances are good it will detect and adjust to the new hardware without problems. Connect the SSD to your computer via USB cable, then boot your computer into a 32-bit live Ubuntu DVD or USB ...



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