Hot answers tagged

3

There is no installer support for 16.04 with ZFS, so you won't be able to create a bootable ZFS-only system just right now using the installer. I'd generally recommend ZFS for multi-drive configurations; a single SSD with ZFS may not be so performance as ext4. It is my personal opinion that ZFS is far more robust than btrfs, and it is my preferred choice ...


2

To install zfs on root, you need to follow the procedure outlined on github for the moment, since the installer cannot use zfs for the moment. Make sure that you don't use the zfsonlinux ppa, but just the official packages from 16.04LTS. Why should you do it? While it's correct that ext4 is faster, with zfs you gain the ability to make snapshots, even ...


2

There is nothing wrong with your system or your SSD. The trim command allows the operating system to inform a solid state drive (SSD) which blocks of data are no longer considered in use and can be wiped internally. So as you have 200 GB of free space, only 200 GB can be trimmed. Or the other way around, because you have 200 GB of free space, 200 GB are ...


2

With cutting edge hardware, you need the newest versions of software, and sometimes even ppa's to get newer than in standard distributions. If using gparted, be sure to download the newest version: gparted should be at least version 0.24.0-1 to recognize NVMe devices http://gparted.sourceforge.net/index.php Since 16.04 is now released.But be sure to ...


1

referring to the smartmontools site: Column Updated Some SMART attributes values, that are updated only during off-line data collection activities are labeled "Offline" in column "UPDATED". How to enable "Offline data collection": smartctl --offlineauto=on


1

Yes this is nomal. If calling fstrim first time after reboot, size of all unused blocks is trimmed and reported. This is because "nobody" knows, which blocks are already trimmed before. Calling fstrim again, it reports only recently freed blocks. This is, because the kernel keeps an eye to trimmed blocks. This information is lost, when rebooting. The ...


1

There are disadvantages of using ZFS with implementations of OpenZFS at the time of writing besides booting, another one is missing encryption. eCryptfs works on ZFS like almost everywhere else and is recommended over LUKS, but it has disadvantages like reducing the maximum filename length if used with filename encryption. The ZFS competitor btrfs is also ...


1

I agree with Videonauth's comment - I have Ubuntu 15.10 installed on a 30GB partition of my Ultrabook's SSD, and I still have space for a few files. Install to the SSD, and put your /home on the HDD.


1

You can move /home to you second SSD. This will also include Steam and PlayOnLinux games. They are normally installed in /home/[user]/.[application]. Edit /etc/fstab for automount on boot: UUID=[UUID] /home ext4 defaults 0 2


1

According to the bug report linked to from the guide this appears to be fixable either by setting AHCI mode, or using EFI. I've only played with even older Macs, but back in those days I used rEFIt to set up an easy dual-boot; these days the working fork of rEFIt is rEFInd. In the bug report folks mention just using grub-efi, which is another option for you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible