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12

The repository for Dell-based projects is here: http://dell-mini.archive.canonical.com/updates For Ubuntu Light as shipped on the Inspiron M101Z specifically you want this URL: http://dell-mini.archive.canonical.com/updates/dists/lucid-omsk/public/


10

Open the Print... menu from the File tab Select the 3º tab called "Text Editor" Click the second option "Print line numbers" so this checkbox remains enabled Now you can choice Print Preview and you will see the line numbers before print it:


9

Installation instructions vary across programs although there are well-established tools like autotools (includes automake and autoconf) and cmake. Since programs can come in different programming languages, its hard to give generic commands that suit all packages. For example, Python often have setup.py scripts where C programs often use autotools or at ...


9

If you want use the same sources from the installed version you must get it from the Ubuntu repository. First, from the softwate center, software sources, you need to enable the "source code" sources. Then you can use apt-get source, to get the source, and dpkg-buildpackage, to build the package. Check the following link for details. ...


8

you have to install bzr and then you download a branch you want: bzr branch lp:inkscape in a directory you want


7

When properly set-up OpenSSH is safe, even on the standard port. Moving it away from the standard port saves you from your log files being filled up by unauthorized login attempts. More details on the end. It's very dangerous to access your server if you do not have control over the computer which should connect to your server (which I think that's the ...


7

Original answer: Yep, you can get it on Launchpad here. Edit: It seems I linked to the wrong tour. The one from my original answer seems to be a desktop version that you would run on Ubuntu, whereas the one the OP is seeking is an online emulation of the Ubuntu desktop. As has been pointed out by user27777, the code for the online version can be found here. ...


6

First - create a working folder to download the source in mkdir ~/working_dir cd ~/working_dir The simplest way is to use the syntax apt-get source [foo] where [foo] is the package name. For example - if you wanted to see the source of nautilus you would use apt-get source nautilus basic development tools Obviously - if you are intent on playing with ...


6

The easiest thing to do may be to look at the build logs for the package in question. You can find them by starting at, e.g., https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/asterisk, then follow the link for the version you care about (in this case, https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/maverick/+source/asterisk/1:1.6.2.7-1ubuntu1.1) Under the "Builds" header, you'll see a ...


6

FreeCAD is available in the Ubuntu Software Center, so it was not necessary to build and install it from source code. The Ubuntu Software Center always the first place where you should look. Installing is just a matter of clicking a button. There's an icon for the Ubuntu Software Center in the bar on the left side of the screen. If you really want to ...


6

If you intend to build scripts, you may want to investigate launchpadlib. However, since I don't use launchpadlib directly, I'll give a couple pointers that hopefully illustrate the gist of manually using data provided in Launchpad to generate diffs. Here're references for using with a web browser or bzr for an example source package, alsa-driver. Debian ...


6

Kompare can do this (and is the best GUI diff-viewer IMO): ./whatchanged package_name | kompare - Note the '-' given as the input file argument. Most *nix programs have this interface to accept piped input, so you can probably use whichever one you like.


5

If you're working in python, Acire is a good choice. First, you need to install the Python Snippets library sudo add-apt-repository ppa:python-snippets-drivers/python-snippets-daily sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install python-snippets Then you can install Acire itself: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:acire-team/acire-releases sudo apt-get update sudo ...


5

You could use vim in ex and command mode, from the terminal. To indent a single file: vim -c "normal ggVG=" -e <file-to-indent> <<'EOF' :wq EOF To indent files recursively, create the following script: indent-with-vim.sh vim -c "normal ggVG=" -e $1 <<'EOF' :wq EOF Now, type: $ chmod u+x indent-with-vim.sh $ find . | xargs -I {} ...


5

If it's that specific, Google should be able to help you -- it has indexed tons of publicly available source code. I'd be very surprised if it didn't find something. Failing that (or any other sort of web search), strings is a pretty handy little application. It reads all the strings out of a file, even if it's binary. I've been hacking around and you can ...


5

This should be available in the glibc package Though most all the packages essential to development and code-building can be found in build-essential


5

Yes, you can participate. Quickly is not necessary to participate in the Ubuntu App Showdown, but make sure that required Python 3.x dependencies are present in the default repository of Ubuntu 12.04. The rules are here. You will need to upload your app to launchpad and create a PPA.


5

The source code for the default environment (Unity) can be found in the package unity. Install the source with apt-get source unity, the dependencies to build it with sudo apt-get build-dep unity and hack away. This will let you position the launcher on the right, bottom, top, etc.


5

Debian Installer. The alternate installer is created by Debian (upstream from Ubuntu). Thus to look for the source, you'll need to pull this from the Debian repositories. http://wiki.debian.org/DebianInstaller/CheckOut According to debian: Debian Installer developers frequently checkout the whole tree for development. Debian are transferring to ...


4

In general, there is no stipulated language or programming model for Ubuntu. In Ubuntu, you can use just about any programming language to create your application(s), so long as the language is supported via any bindings and libraries that it requires. For example, you can write application for Ubuntu that target either GTK+ or Qt, which both support ...


4

kernel.org should have all of the previous versions available, at least since they were being kept in source control. I'm not sure if it's the very first release, but their site has linux kernel 0.01 (with a timestamp from 1993) available here: http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/Historic/


4

You can download the source code of ubuntu kernel, using sudo apt-get install linux-source A bzip file will be downloaded at /usr/src/ containing the source code. However, ubuntu codes are taken from the orginal linux kernel which is available for download at http://www.kernel.org/. To understand the kernel, you must start with basics of operating ...


4

I think that you won't be able to see the configure options from the binary (.deb) package. You can just find some information regarding the dependencies involved by using: apt-cache showpkg asterisk If you need to check the configure options, i think you should download the source files by typing: apt-get source asterisk and then check for the ...


4

It is best to note that a software's dependencies rarely change. If you have successfully compiled the software once, any subsequent versions should be easy to compile - all dependencies should be satisfied already. If you compiled from source, there is no .deb or similar package that you would be able to use to update, unless you wait for the distribution ...


4

You might want to have a look at git-buildpackage. There are similar tools, one for each VCS: $ aptitude search buildpackage p arch-buildpackage - tools for maintaining Debian packages using arch v bzr-buildpackage - p cvs-buildpackage - A ...


4

You mention the kernel as a program of concern. The kernel, and everything written in C, is compiled, so the source code is read and translated into machine code. All comments are stripped during this process. So you don't need to worry about any slowdown in comments. Interpreted code, in, say, shell or python, could potentially suffer from comment-induced ...


3

Run dch -i in the source directory to add a new changelog entry. If you update the version line to something like 0.7.1-1ubuntu0+marco1 (the key being the +) it'll sort as being newer than 0.7.1-1 but still older than 0.7.1-1ubuntu1 when Ubuntu releases a security update (since missing security updates is bad) If you really want to not get security updates ...


3

Code::Blocks might be an option. Code::Blocks is a free C++ IDE built to meet the most demanding needs of its users. It is designed to be very extensible and fully configurable. An IDE with all the features a developer need, having a consistent look, feel and operation across platforms. Built around a plugin framework, Code::Blocks can be extended with ...


3

Perhaps, you can try taking a look at the source code of quickly. To do that, run the following command in a terminal: apt-get source quickly For the command to work, you need to have enabled Source code in the software-properties-gtk.



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