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Best Solution: Totem In Totem you can create custom chapters. By choosing “Chapters” from the “View”, you get a sidebar for working with chapters: By clicking the “Add New Chapters” button in the sidebar and then using the buttons at the bottom of the sidebar, chapter markers can be added, deleted and saved: Saving creates a new file with the same ...


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For Ubuntu (or Linux, in general) there are: OpenShot Video Editor Imagination video editor PhotoFilmStrip Avidemux And others. You can get ALL of them if you install a Linux distribution called "ARTISTX" (Version 1.5 liveDVD download from developer site). There are a good number of transitions and they are VISUAL so no need deep knowledge of Linux or ...


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Not a native Linux solution, but if you have Wine installed, Pixie is a free (as in beer) small app that will show you both your cursor's coordinates and the color of the pixel directly underneath it in several formats.


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You can use lxc-start-ephemeral. It creates an overlayfs (and by default backs it with a tmpfs so it's in memory and crazy fast). Once you shut down the container, the overlayfs goes away (unless you specified --keep-data, in which case the overlay is kept around). A downside versus arkose (which I never used, though, so I don't know) is that you have to ...


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On recent versions of Firefox, there is no need for any plugins. This capability is built into the browser. In Firefox, use Shift+F2 to open the in-browser CLI. This is a command-line interface at the bottom of the browser window which lets you do all kinds of awesome stuff. (I find the restart option particularly useful.) Type screenshot --fullpage (this ...


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In gwenview Go to plugins > tools > advanced slideshow If Plugins is empty (by default I think kubuntu doesn't install them) you need to add kipi-plugins I think. There may be a helper anyway once go to Plugins


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You can do everything you need from the desktop edition, provided you install the needed software. More importantly, server actually removes some features from desktop edition, which don't make particularly much sense for an enterprise server installation, but you might want available for your purposes. So you might prefer to stay with Ubuntu Desktop, or ...


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I've found that I suffer from this (especially early in the morning or late at night). The solution I used was f.lux by Michael and Lorna Herf included with the f.lux indicator applet by Kilian Valkhof Installation: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:kilian/f.lux sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install fluxgui Configuration: Launch the f.lux indicator applet ...


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GNU Emacs. Old versions (i.e., anything before 19.29) of GNU Emacs had problems editing files larger than 8 megabytes. As of version 19.29, the maximum buffer size is at least 2^27-1, or 134,217,727 bytes. On a 64bit system, the limit is pushed to 2^59-1 which is almost a million Terabytes. Vim Maximum file size 2147483647 bytes (2 Gbyte) when a ...


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Having tried others, I recommend Atareao's Pomodoro Indicator App. Why? It is simple, beautiful, configurable, works in ubuntu 14.04 and 14.10, and has a PPA. Also, the developer is known for writing quality indicator apps such as my-weather-indicator. My favourite thing is that the icon changes to reflect how much time is left. Here's a time-lapse screen ...


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Looks like this question was asked when Unity was brand new and not many people were using it. None of the answers listed make use of the Unity menu bar, which imo is the only worthwhile place to have a system monitor. Apparently the things in the menu bar are called "Application Indicators" and so far the closest thing I've found to iStat Menus is ...


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You can check Keepboard. It is written in Java and thus works on most distros.


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Keepboard is another one that offers such features.


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When Keepboard is activated, the second item in the history is selected by default (because the top item is in the clipboard anyway and can be pasted directly without activating clipboard manager). Thus you can quickly paste the second item by using Keepboard activation hotkey and pressing Enter right away.


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You can check Keepboard. It provides configurable shortcut keys for activation and other common operations.


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nomarch did not work for me(my file is .arc) : nomarch: bad first header - not a .arc file? FreeArc did : http://freearc.org/ it should work find if you are x86 (32-bit) sysytem.(check with uname -a) I use x86_64(64-bit) system, which is not supported by FreeArc. I solved the problem by running FreeArc's Windows version under wine.


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For users with 14.04+ this is an up to date list of the ones I have tested that also offer a GUI (Quick Save/Load, full compatibility and more), do not need to be compiled (Offer a DEB package) and have been tested up to and including 15.04: Sega Genesis - Gens/GS (And also in Development Gens/GS2 )


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To learn Python try Pycharm, it works fine and im using it. Best Media Player is VLC ( Download it from Ubuntu Software Center ) For torrents software, try qbittorrent ( Download it from Ubuntu Software Center )


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You questions seems to be a bit too broad, I will limit myself to answer the question in your title, What to do after installing ubuntu. There is a great website that published this kind of posts everytime a new version is released, And this is what I have actually used mysel, back then... ...


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Tixati I have tried all popular Linux torrent clients (including Vuze, Deluge, Transmision, Qbittorrent-this one I have used for more then a year) but Tixati beats them all it it's features and simplicity. What I like most: - Torrents management -- Add labels -- Specify label's download directory (All the files with specified label will be downloaded to ...


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SpaceFM sudo apt-get install spacefm


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I was searching for exactly the same. For me, qpdfview works like a charm, is simple to use and lightweight. Its annotations and text highlighting is recognised in Adobe Reader (Linux version 9, Windows. iOS). Editing done on the aforementioned platforms are recognised by qpdfview as well. It allows you to delete annotations and highlighting too, and stores ...


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We have developed an open source solution, downloadable from http://www.scientilla.net or from GitHub, that allows users to collaboratively share and refine their scientific bibliographic metadata. The system relies on a "peer-to-peer" and "open-data" approach as well as on a "clone-and-refine" algorithm. It can import data from external web services. ...


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You can try out any other software that do spell checking and auto correction while you are typing. The one Abiword is already mentioned in the above reply. I would like to have few other suggestions such as using BEAN, Office Office or Ne office for such task. All of the above mentioned softwares are good and has the feature included in their latest ...


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What you're looking for is pinta . You can install it from the software centre by clicking above, or you can grab the daily build (not recommended!!!) from a PPA: ppa:pinta-maintainers/pinta-daily Here's a screenshot for greater glory:


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I'm sorry, there isn't any further Ubuntu Builder solution. I talked to the developer and he cited a couple of reasons why he discontinued the project. First, he is very busy with real life. Second, he didn't feel he was competent enough to continue the project. I didn't agree with him about the competency because his project was really brilliant and useful! ...


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Try Xournal: Xournal is a GTK+ application for notetaking, sketching and keeping a journal using a stylus. It can also be used to add annotations to PDF files.


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My suggestion would be Cool Reader 3. It's a simple install, and a very lightweight program (nothing so bulky as Calibre, which is nice software IF you have eBook hardware like e.g. a Kindle or a Sony, but overpowered for just a ePub viewer). You can get Cool Reader by: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:vovansrnd/coolreader sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get ...


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There are a number of good Linux Freecells out there, and no doubt you will get the full list (from others). I, however have a more elegant solution. If you miss MS Freecell you can install that. My favorite method to do that would be to install Playonlinux: sudo apt-get install playonlinux Tho you can use a gui software installer if you like. From ...


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NO, you cannot run a 64-bit program in a 32-bit architecture. If your CPU is capable 64-bit architecture only then will this work You can make a live CD or USB version of whatever OS you use and run it there or run it in a virtual machine like Virtualbox, but this is no light solution You should probably be able to find a 32-bit version of what you want to ...


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If and only if your CPU is capable of hardware virtualization (VT-x/AMD-V) you can execute a 64-bit application in a virtual 64-bit OS running in a virtual machine such as Virtual Box. Of course this may not be the lightweight solution you need.


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It depends on your CPU architecture. If you have a 32 bit CPU, no piece of software is going to allow you to run 64 bit applications because the CPU itself is incapable of running the software. If you have a 64 bit CPU you are able to run 32 & 64 bit Ubuntu - but only 64 bit Ubuntu can run 64 bit software (AFAIK - I'll keep looking around a bit more). ...


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There's no way to run a 64-bit program in a 32-bit OS. Try a Live CD or USB with a 64-bit version of the OS (assuming your hardware is 64-bit capable, but it most likely is unless it's old or a low-end netbook).


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There are two established algorithms that can measure the faithfulness of video to its source. You have to input two video streams, the original source and the encoded version, and the algorithm calculates the faithfulness and outputs a figure. Unfortunately for you, they both require you to supply the un-compressed source along with the compressed video, ...


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Create a script with following containt #!/bin/bash first_u=$(awk '{printf "%.0f" , $0/60;}' /proc/uptime) while true do uptime_m=$(awk '{printf "%.0f" , $0/60;}' /proc/uptime) (( time_dif=$uptime_m - $first_u )) if [ $time_dif -eq 30 ]; then notify-send "You have on laptop since 30 minutes" sleep 1800 notify-send "You have on laptop ...


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1 Try alarm-clock-applet sudo apt-get install alarm-clock-applet 2 Also Gnome Clock has a countdown feature. But it has to be set manually every time. sudo apt-get install gnome-clocks



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