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0

try insert in grub command line (etc/default/grub) the "restart=acpi halt=acpi poweroff=acpi" commands, update in terminal (sudo update-grub) if work then install 64 bit version and update it when install done.


0

It happened to me also with Plasma 5.3. I had to go back to Plasma 5.2 to be able of shutting down from the gui menu.


1

Try disabling hibernation completely by running powercfg /h off as administrator in windows. Happy that this solved the issue for you!


0

I have the same problem, and what I do is to "reboot" windows, and then choose ubuntu from the grub menu. Then I can mount windows partitions with no problem. My theory is that windows hibernates when you choose "shut down". Another one of those misleading/lying windows actions. Now I just never "shut down" windows, I always reboot into a linux distro, and ...


0

Found a really easy solution! Create a file /etc/pm/sleep.d/70-check-recordings. In this file check if a recording currently is active. If yes, just return exit 1. That's it. Suspend will be aborted. The script I use is based on a script that sets the wakeup time for future recording. Since I don't know the original author, I don't want to publish it ...


0

In /etc/sudoers file add a line: %sudo ALL= NOPASSWD: /sbin/shutdown To edit /etc/sudoers file, run visudo command.


0

The easiest way for this without using sudo everytime is giving shutdown command special permissions, so that if the user runs shutdown it will run with root permissions for this do sudo chmod u+s /sbin/shutdown now the shutdown command won't need root everytime you issue the command and if you wan't to revert it you can always do sudo chmod u-s ...


3

Log out of your graphical session and go to TTY1 whith Ctrl+Alt+F1. Log in and edit the file /etc/default/grub sudo nano /etc/default/grub or if you like vi sudo vim /etc/default/grub Remove the values for GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="" Then update GRUB and reboot sudo update-grub sudo reboot


0

Change your line to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="", update grub, and reboot.


0

I had the same issue. I resolved it installing Kernel 4.0: $ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.0-vivid/linux-headers-4.0.0-040000_4.0.0-040000.201504121935_all.deb $ wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.0-vivid/linux-headers-4.0.0-040000-generic_4.0.0-040000.201504121935_amd64.deb $ wget ...


0

Just thoughts... I have equal problem with Fujitsu-Siemens AMILO Pro V3505, started at unnoticed moment of time (13.10 or 14.04). Upgrading to 14.10 did not solved the problem. Even the shutdown screen is similar to yours: after shutting down the ModemManager (do you have built-in dial-up modem?) system stuck on "Will now halt" And it is not the installed ...


0

I added simple sleep command to the stop section of the init script as suggested by @user1133275. This works well. Of course this could be optimized, but it is good enough for the time being. `stop() { [ -z "$VBOXAUTOSTART_DB" ] && exit 0 [ -z "$VBOXAUTOSTART_CONFIG" ] && exit 0 PARAMS="--stop --config $VBOXAUTOSTART_CONFIG" # ...


0

I had the same problem, my system got stuck during the shutdown, but it didn't show the same text that you specify. I tried modifying the grub, I used the terminal with the different commands possible to force shutdown the system and none worked, However I've found a solution by updating the BIOS, maybe you can try this.


0

I had the problem with a fresh installation of kubuntu 14.10: the kubuntu screen froze during shutdown. My solution was: 1. Changed this line in file /etc/default/grub to look like this: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash init=/lib/systemd/systemd" 2. After that, run "sudo update-grub" in a terminal Now the system shuts down again...hope this ...


1

I had the same problem with Kubuntu 14.10. My solution was: I changed this line in file /etc/default/grub to look like this: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash init=/lib/systemd/systemd" After that, I ran sudo update-grub in a Terminal Now the system shuts down again...:-)


1

I think the problem is in your video card try sudo apt-get install fglrx xvba-va-driver libva-glx1 libva-egl1 vainfo EDIT: Try: sudo apt-get install libcheese* sudo apt-get install xorg-video-abi-15 sudo apt-get install fglrx-updates


0

I solved with Guacamole (http://guac-dev.org). With a php script it could be dangerous and with teamviewer it freezes because every time I have to stop the demon with "teamviewer --daemon stop" from a remote terminal (very complicated if you connect from a mobile).


5

You can use this command: <your_app> & disown In this case: google-chrome & disown Source In the bash shell, the disown builtin command is used to remove jobs from the job table, or to mark jobs so that a SIGHUP signal is not sent to them if the parent shell receives it (e.g. if the user logs out).


0

You could use the ~./bash_logout if it's for when users log off (note, bash shell, e.g ssh). But some other situations are also described in the article/answer below, superuser.com: create-a-logoff-script-task-for-linux @heemayl and others already describe some of the commands you can use to get the still running processes when the users logs off. If you ...


3

This answer by Radu gives you a complete overview of how to execute particular script upon logout or shutdown. What you can do is create the script like this #!/bin/bash ps -u username > /home/yourusername/outputfile.txt Then sudo chmod +x scriptname and add line session-cleanup-script=/path/to/script to /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf As for shutdown . ...


1

You can run htop from one of the tty consoles so that you can log a user out of an xsession but still maintain an open terminal (htop is better than top and easier to read). CTRL + ALT + F2 You can login a text session under a different username from there and then, use: sudo htop to start it up. Use F6 and then scroll up to USER using the arrow button ...


1

Use the following to list all the processes of any particular user: $ ps -fu "username" For example: $ ps -fu foobar To save it in a file: $ ps -fu foobar > ~/ps_foobar Here is a one liner that can be used via cron or any other repitition mechanism: [[ $(ps -u foobar | wc -l) -gt 1 ]] && echo "user foobar has process running" || echo ...


3

You're on the right track: I would also have one user watching the other. If top doesn't give you the output you want I would use ps aux in an infinite loop with a 1 second delay. #!/bin/bash # Example script for watching a logging off user # This script is an answer to ...


0

You can achieve both things Shutdown on idle after specif period. Weather a user logged in or not it should shutdown. with a simple bash script. The script will check the idle time and if it is greater than given number it will completely shutdown the system. You can then set this script to execute every minute or every 10 seconds (as you prefer) by ...


0

Problem was solved by upgrading BIOS firmware and reinstalling Ubuntu ACPI subsystem, without any specials tweaks. Now on poweroff / reboot I see fully shutdown log.


0

sudo apt-get install v86d gksudo gedit /etc/default/grub Replace the matching content with: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash nomodeset video=uvesafb:mode_option=1024x768-24, mtrr=3, scroll=ywrap" GRUB_GFXMODE=1024x768 GRUB_GFXPAYLOAD_LINUX=keep Then: gksudo gedit /etc/initramfs-tools/modules add this: uvesafb mode_option=1024x768-24 mtrr=3 ...



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