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A GUI resolution is to install Cairo-dock from the repository and click on the Shutdown button on that menu to shutdown or restart. While using the terminal commands work. For some people, having to go to a terminal screen is at least, overly complicated, and also a lot of work. I've been using this Gui workaround for the past 6 Ubuntu version releases. ...


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I can't read it, but mine always end up doing something like that. I wouldn't worry, only if it starts to work differently. Or if it appears on turning on. That always ends up being something that I have to fix...


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Try putting the script in different runlevels. /etc/rc0.d - While system shuts down. /etc/rcS.d - While system boots /etc/rc1.d - Working as singel user (user specific on login) /etc/rc2.d - Working as multiple users /etc/rc3.d bis /etc/rc5.d - not used in ubuntu /etc/rc6.d - While system restarts


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I'm having similar issues with my Acer... In my searching, I found suggestions to blacklist some drivers. In particular, dw_mac and dw_mac_core. Try this... echo "blacklist dw_dmac" | sudo tee -a /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf echo "blacklist dw_dmac_core" | sudo tee -a /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf I suggest this because of the "dw_mac... invalid ...


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OK, so you want to set up a service on the host machine to wait for a shutdown signal, and then shut down. Run this in Terminal: sudo echo "cat /dev/ttyS0 poweroff" > /etc/sbin/sshutdownd sudo chmod 755 /etc/sbin/sshutdownd And then just run this at boot (you can throw it in an init.d script if you want): nohup /etc/sbin/sshutdownd & On the ...


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Passing a reboot= parameter to the kernel can solve this issue, no matter which shutdown command is used. See http://linux.koolsolutions.com/2009/08/04/howto-fix-linux-hangfreeze-during-reboots-and-restarts/ for more details. In my case, reboot=pci fixed the problem for a Dell Optiplex 790.


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No, you can't make that setup using HandlePowerKey entry for systemd. It is not a script hook, just a predefined options. HandlePowerKey=, HandleSuspendKey=, HandleHibernateKey=, HandleLidSwitch=, HandleLidSwitchDocked= Controls whether logind shall handle the system power and sleep keys and the lid switch to trigger actions such as system ...


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I had similar problem to yours, would try to shut down or restart but the computer would go a black screen and would not power off. My computer has the same cpu. I found the solution is to blacklist a couple of drivers as found in this link http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=163126&start=20#p961212 . OldFred from Ubuntu forums pointed ...


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shutdown command shutdown arranges for the system to be brought down in a safe way. All logged-in users are notified that the system is going down and, within the last five minutes of TIME, new logins are prevented. The shutdown utility provides an automated shutdown procedure for supersers to nicely notify users when the system is shutting down, saving ...


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On the top right of your desktop screen there should be a cog icon. Clicking on it will bring up the shut down option. If you are trying other methods, please specify.


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Since you're already root, instead of the complicated su -c "sudo /home/programer/bin/halt" user-name password - keep it simple /sbin/halt


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You can use system() function defined in the header stdlib.h. #include<stdlib.h> int main() { system("dbus-send --system --print-reply --dest=org.freedesktop.login1 /org/freedesktop/login1 \"org.freedesktop.login1.Manager.PowerOff\" boolean:true"); retrun 0; } This is advised over sudo shutdown because the former doesnot require root ...


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… how can I send commands to terminal from my program … Using system, eg: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main() { system("/bin/ls -la"); } or #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main() { system("sudo shutdown"); } Example % gcc foo.cpp % ./a.out [sudo] password for aboettger: % cat foo.cpp ...


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The package that handles the AC-to-battery transition is pm-utils. On a command line, looking at the files in the pm-utils package will tell you where to go next: $ dpkg -L pm-utils ...<snip>... /usr/share/man/man1/pm-is-supported.1.gz /usr/share/man/man8/pm-powersave.8.gz /usr/share/man/man8/pm-action.8.gz ...<snip>... ...


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perhaps you need to gather more information - if the above mentioned memtestx86+ doesn't reveal a memory problem - some other hint should be discoverable. we use kibana to gather logfiles onto a central server for further investigation: https://www.elastic.co/products/kibana that is posibly a way to find the problem...


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I have some IT server administration experience, 64 gibs of RAM sounds like where your problem is coming from,that configuration leaves allot of possibility for hardware failure, from what you are describing it sounds like one of your memory sticks gets hot it fails and causing a system shutdown to protect damage, it is summer now, I would try a process of ...


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Note: This is only a partial answer, dealing only with the difference between uptime and suspended time. You could determine the difference between uptime and suspended time utilizing some of the information available via /proc/timer_list. Example 1: $ uptime 11:58:46 up 3:43, 2 users, load average: 0.00, 0.01, 0.05 $ cat /proc/timer_list | grep "now ...


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You run the risk of causing filesystem inconsistencies. It is better, even when out of RAM, as this normally still works in such situations, to use the alt-sysrq sequence, as that will attempt to shut things down as cleanly as possible (if it fails, then you're no worse off than if you pressed the power button, but if it succeeds then you're potentially ...


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I would recommend turning off acpi to rule out a false sensor or condition based shutdown if you disable acpi, then the only other way would be by script or someone remotely entering a shutdown command. its better to adjust your grub - you will not have to keep changing it when a new kernel comes along. sudo nano /etc/default/grub change the line ...


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Shutdown: /usr/lib/indicator-session/gtk-logout-helper --shutdown Reboot /usr/lib/indicator-session/gtk-logout-helper --restart Logout /usr/lib/indicator-session/gtk-logout-helper --logout You can also use another dialog: gnome-session-quit --power-off


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That seems to be a known problem. The solution varies depending on if you use Gnome or Unity. If you use the searchengine on this site you'll get pointers. Different possible solutions are mentioned but the following two are mentioned often. In Unity it seems to work if you type in the terminal: unity --reset.In Gnome it seems to work if you type in the ...


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this question was solved here: http://unix.stackexchange.com/q/1974 you just need to add that command like echo -e "\a" to execution of power button event. it uses "beep" package, so you should install it before sudo apt-get install beep


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You can use Polkit rules to control the GUI shutdown privileges (the shutdown command isn't affected, and needs root as usual). A set of rules like in this answer should do. Create a .pkla file in /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/ (say 00-disable-shutdown.pkla): [Disable Shutdown, etc. for all users] Identity=unix-user:* ...


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You didn't include much about your problem and given that you claim not to be very good with Linux, I would recommend the following: Create an Ubuntu live USB using another computer with Windows or Ubuntu. Use it to backup all your data. Unplug your new USB mouse and connect your laptop to internet with an ethernet cable. Open a console and type the ...


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Modified @redanimalwar script to warn user and give a chance to cancel the shutdown. For tests, it is usung 3 seconds and a chero message. Please adjust for your tastes. HTH. #!/bin/bash #https://askubuntu.com/questions/442795/ #http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2172828 function showProgress(){ # # Force Zenity Status message box to always be on ...



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