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3

If you are on GNOME, there is a gnome-tweak-tool, sudo apt-get install gnome-tweak-tool with which you can edit what power button does. In gnome-tweak-tool you just have click on Power in left panel and you will see something like this:


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I just want to share my experience with an ASUS battery: Also my netbook suddenly turned off when it was under 30% battery. However I never had the fan and freezing problem. I went along with it for months until one day it never turned on unplugged. It seems they define a life cycle for the batteries. My battery suddenly stopped working while it could save ...


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Wrap it up in a subshell: sudo sh -c "/path/to/script; shutdown -h now" The problem there is the script will run as root too. This might not be an issue (consider it in your case) but you can work around this by using sudo again to break back down to your $USER (which will be replaced because we're using double-quotes): sudo sh -c "sudo -u $USER ...


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It would be safer to do a Alt+SysRq+(R,E,I,S,U,B or O) than force a hard reboot. R Switch the keyboard from raw mode to XLATE mode E SIGTERM everything except init I SIGKILL everything except init S Syncs the mounted filesystems U Remounts the mounted filesystems in read-only mode B Reboot the system, or O Turn off the system You could just ...


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By default, Ubuntu uses ufw. You are going to be best off using ufw to configure iptables. If you wish to use iptables directly, you can the use iptable-persistent, but you must save your rules first. I believe this command will help: sudo bash -c "iptables-save > /etc/iptables/rules" You can do this without installing iptables-persistent : Other ...


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Maybe this will help a little, by default ubuntu and others swappiness are set to 60 , when your system reaches 60% of ram usage it changes to swap which is slow. Open this file on gedit or nano using: gksudo gedit /etc/sysctl.conf OR sudo nano /etc/sysctl.conf Add this to the end of the file: vm.swapiness = 0 Save the file and reboot. Also when it gets ...


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This is a "problem" of your motherboard supplying power even when computer is shutdown. I had the same with my old one. My keyboard was on all the time, as well as my mouse. No matter if computer was shut down or sleeping.


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According to Ubuntu upstart cookbook: Ubuntu currently employs a hybrid system where core services are handled by Upstart, but additional services can be run in the legacy SystemV mode. This may seem odd, but consider that there are thousands of packages available in Ubuntu via the Universe and Multiverse repositories and hundreds of services. To ...


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If your vagrant VMs are using VirtualBox, you can modify /etc/default/virtualbox and change the line that reads: SHUTDOWN_USERS="" to SHUTDOWN_USERS="all" That fixed it for me on Ubuntu 14.04



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