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0

I solved this by adding the shortcut Ctrl+Alt+T for the command gnome-terminal, using XFCE and TigerVNC. Go to the XFCE settings or run xfce4-settings-manager, then Keyboard, Application Shortcuts. Press Add and use gnome-terminal as the command you want to trigger and finally the shortcut.


0

By removing power and the battery, everything is back to normal ! It seems that it is a known problem for HP laptops which has nothing to do with Ubuntu. I post the answer here because some people could be interested.


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It seems, that problem was with the /var/lib/xkb folder write permissions. I changed it with sudo chmod a=rwx /var/lib/xkb (which was not easy without english/us keyboard) And after reboot I was able to use US layout again.


0

I ran into the same problems when using flashback compiz. I now use flashback metacity and everything works off the shell as expected.


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You can use CCSM (CompizConfig Settings Manager) to set which shortcut opens the dash or to disable it. sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager Then from the terminal start it by executing ccsm, find the Ubuntu Unity Plugin and select the Launcher tab. Disable the "Key to show Dash..." shortcut.


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How to create an icon on your desktop to perform the recompile-job Open gedit, paste the lines below into the file: [Desktop Entry] Name=Recompile Exec=/bin/bash -c "cd ~/mt7601/src&&make clean&&make&&sudo make install&&sudo modprobe mt7601Usta" Type=Application Terminal=true Save the file as recompile.desktop on your ...


4

Low reputation disallows commenting, so the answer instead of comment to Brian's answer. The script in discussion must be run with root privileges. To avoid some confusion, the shortcut for it's launch should look like gksudo script_name The gksudo/gksu command brings up graphical dialogue for entering password Also, the better place to store ...


0

Make a script nohudrun like the primusrun is done: #!/bin/sh old_key="$(LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/lib dconf read /org/compiz/integrated/show-hud)" LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/lib dconf write /org/compiz/integrated/show-hud "['']" "$@" LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/lib dconf write /org/compiz/integrated/show-hud "$old_key" And invoke it like that: nohudrun primusrun ...


7

You can make a script that can do these commands for you. Simply create a text file located on your desktop that contains the following. #!/bin/bash cd ~/mt7601/src make clean make make install modprobe mt7601Usta Save it to the desktop as kernelupdate.sh You should then open up a terminal and run the followings commands cd ~/Desktop/ chmod +x ...


0

As a workaround you could create a shortcut (System Settings -> Keyboard -> Shortcuts tab) and assign it to command gnome-screensaver-command -l


0

Try keytouch, a keyboard shortcuts editor. Install in the terminal by typing sudo apt-get install keytouch keytouch-editor


-1

Hold down fn when you press the keys.


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To show events from keyboards, but also other input devices, there is also evtest. It can not block or create keypresses, though. It shows events on a lower level than xev would, for example. Also, it shows which events can be created by the device. Example output of evtest /dev/input/event4 from pressing aB: [ ... ] Event: time 1429316964.681508, ...


2

I have not found a system-wide shortcut (even on OS X, the shortcut may change depending on the application), but there is a way to find the right shortcut for each prompt: When the prompt appears, hold alt and look at the underlined characters (as you would for an application top menu). Of course, we are interested in the "Close without saving" option ...


3

The way that I prefer to use to achieve this is by re-maping the Up and Down keys to Bash's history search. This can be achieved by adding the following to .inputrc: "\e[A": history-search-backward "\e[B": history-search-forward After reloading your shell, pressing Up or Down on an empty prompt will navigate through all of the commands, and pressing Up or ...


2

If you are in vi mode in bash (set -o vi), you can go in command mode (press Esc), and then type /whatever_you_want, followed by Enter. It will search whatever you want, and you can scroll with j and k keys. Hit enter when you found the right command. To be able to type commands when you have hitted Esc, you have to hit i (this is vi). Going back to ...


0

Since the other solutions didn't work, this is another xdotool-based solution. You can use xdotool within a bash script to send a Shift+Ctrl+Q keystroke to all the windows whose class name is "gnome-terminal". Create a bash script in, say, ~/scripts, named, say, poof.sh: #!/bin/bash xdotool search --maxdepth 3 --class '^gnome-terminal$' > all.txt ...


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I always use history it's just more convinient for me to see all the commands that I type for example: history lists you all commands that you typed for a while history | grep nmap lists you only commands with nmap history | grep nmap | tail -10 history | grep nmap | head -10 lists you last and first 10 commands with nmap then just copy and paste ...


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Yes, there is a very simple way to search through your command history. When at the terminal, press Ctrl-R to begin a search, then you can type nmap and it will search back to the last command using nmap. If you don't want the last command that contained the 'nmap' word but some other further to the past, then you can hit Ctrl-R again as many times as you'd ...


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In the system settings, just change the keyboard shortcut for "Key to show the HUD" (under 'Launchers'). As a suggestion, set it to activate when both the alt keys are pressed at the same time, instead of just one. It makes using VMs much less annoying.


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There are actually two CMD + Q alternatives for Ubuntu. One is very similar to CMD + Q: ctrl + Q. This doesn't work on all programs, however, so you'll probably be better off using ALT + F4.


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Even the "friendliest" kill- command will close the terminal without asking. Also man gnome-terminal does not give any solution to close the window like in the GUI. You can however make a script raise (all) gnome-terminal windows and simulate Ctrl+Shift+Q. A complexity is that this will not work when the windows are spread over different workspaces. The ...


0

You can use this simple shell script close_terminals: #!/bin/bash xdotool search --class "terminal" | while read id do xdotool windowactivate "$id" &>/dev/null xdotool key ctrl+shift+q sleep 0.2 done Then create a new shortcut and call this script.


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Going off of @Aron's answer, simply perform the following steps: Go to about:config in the URL bar Search for accelKey Change the value to 17 for CTRL or 18 for ALT Restart Firefox


0

I found a solution : install CompizConfig, section window manager, and check grid box.


0

You could use terminal if you wanted. Open a terminal use the command gconftool -u "/$entry"


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These shortcuts are present in "Keyboard" option in "System Settings" or you may search for "keyboard" in "dash". Four shortcuts for navigation are defined there, on changing which you may get back old ones.


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Very much a workaround but I have instead used compizconfig to map these keys to CLI commands for banshee rather than trying to use the media keys. Works 100% in banshee therefore but no use if you're using other media players.


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Ubuntu 14.04: for some reason neither "CompizConfig ⇒ Gnome Compatibility" nor "All Settings ⇒ Keyboard ⇒ Screenshots" worked for me. One thing that helped me was to define custom global shortcuts. I went to "All Settings ⇒ Keyboard ⇒ Screenshots" and removed all conflicting bindings on a "Print" key, which I was going to use. Then in the same window I ...


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I've also encountered this problem in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and searched exhaustively for this. Finally I found a perfect solution for this problem. The way is to use a lightweight tool named xdotool to simulate the mouse move and then assign a shortcut for it. The step in detail is as followed: Open a terminal and install xdotool via command sudo apt-get ...


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You can find it in the Ubuntu Software Centre.


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IBus is the modern Unix/Linux keyboard input method. Funnily, I experienced a problem because of the exact opposite of your situation: IBus wasn't turned on by default in a fresh Xubuntu installation. IBus inputs AND switching methods can be configured in the IBus config Window which can be found in "Settings" -> "Keyboard Input Methods" (with an "i" icon).


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When you send the unstoppable SIGSTOP signal, the program is placed in a paused state with the expectation that a SIGCONT signal will be received, I believe what you are seeing is by design. "The only circumstances in which an unstoppable signal may be deferred is if the process is in IO wait, or stuck in kernel space. Then it’s just deferred, and will be ...


0

So this is sort of variation of my answer to this question. Make sure you set the profile in your terminal to hold the window , then create the script bellow, and assign a keyboard shortcut to this script (basicall full path to the script as command of the shortcut). When you are in nautilus folder where you wanna run java compiler, run #!/bin/sh # set ...


0

Not quite an answer here, but more then a comment. If this is currently possible, I'm guessing it would involve editing the appropriate .desktop files, but I can't find such a file for Trash or Desktop, which makes me think the letters for those are hard-coded in to Unity. Of course you can assign shortcuts under Keyboard settings, but that doesn't work ...


1

What I found so far, is that based on the answer from @swift and some evtest the way it is saved in dconf is not recognized by the system when you do it using the shortcuts from the settings, where it is saved like "Launch5, Launch6, Launch7, etc" So you have to go to the gconf-editor and use the "code" of the key so you will have something like ...


0

you can use a ide called geany, for installing it type sudo apt-get install geany and after go to the edit menu and then go to keybindings menu and from there set keyword for commenting and uncommenting the code, and then press code combination in the code it will work,


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It could very well be caused by a corrupted dconf database. You can find out by removing or (temporarily?) renaming the directory ~/.config/dconf/, and log out and back in to force the creation of a new database. If it turns out to be the cause, you can remove the outdated database. Edit You mentioned in a comment that it has occurred on several ...


2

I've had this problem with Pycharm when I first installed Unity and did some customs, am still not sure if the problem occurred from Unity Here is what you want to do: Install DConf Editor & Lunch it. Go to Desktop Then ibus General Now check the box next to use-global-engine and use-system-keyboard-layout Edit: Make sure to match the keyboard ...


0

Ubuntu Studio 14.04 (XFCE) here. I didn't have problem with Autocomplete (Ctrl + Space), but with Copy Line (Ctrl + Alt + Down). This worked for me: Open Windows Manager: xfwm4-settings Go to Keyboard tab Scroll down to conflicting Action Hit Clear button or change action to different shortcut


0

This works for me in Ubuntu Studio 14.04 (XFCE): Open Windows Manager: xfwm4-settings Go to Keyboard tab Scroll down to conflicting Action Hit Clear button or change action to different shortcut


0

Stephan's Answer which is quoted in Lambart's answer was updated and now has a very interesting side-note: I also found out that the GUI that allows you to assign keybindings is limited in a way that annoys me. The GUI allows exactly ONE keybinding to be assigned to each action. In dconf, you can set an array of bindings for a single action. ...


2

I'm pretty sure the problem is the ~. That is a shell (commandline shell) feature and the keyboard shortcuts are handled by the graphical shell. I don't think that ~ or $HOME will be expanded correctly there. So, instead of ~/path/to/script, use /home/username/Documents/Various/SyncStuff.sh That assumes you have made the script executable. If not, use sh ...


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The keys The keys you are looking for are: for editing the input sources: org.gnome.desktop.input-sources sources for editing the keyboard shortcut for switching languages forward: org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings switch-input-source for switching input source backward: org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings switch-input-source-backward The commands to ...


-1

The key combination didn’t work because some other program used it. To fix this I used gconf-editor. Open gconf-editor. Choose desktop -> ibus -> general -> hotkey. Open trigger parameter. Remove CTRL+SHIFT+U key combination from the list and press OK.


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In the terminal: sudo gedit /etc/default/grub Change GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash acpi_osi=" Then, save the file. sudo update-grub Restart computer. The function keys (Fn+F5/F6) should now be active. I found out that the grub file got modified after an upgrade of the system and had to do ...


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Jacob Vlijm's python script was very useful. I am sharing a shell script to do this if someone may find it useful. #!/bin/sh ls -d ~/.gconf/desktop/gnome/keybindings/*/ if [[ `echo $?` == 2 ]]; then shortCutNumber=0 else shortCutNumber=$((`ls -d ~/.gconf/desktop/gnome/keybindings/*/ | tail -c 3 | head -c 1`+1)) fi echo -e ...


1

Adding shortcut keybindings from the command line in 12.04 To prevent the accepted answer to become too extensive, posting a separate solution for 12.04. Until (and including) 12.04, custom keybindings are not stored in the dconf database, but in ~/.gconf/desktop/gnome/keybindings (in an xml file, in subfolders like custom0 etc). The script below creates ...


1

What version of gedit are you using? In mine, you can use the arrow keys to browse the filesystem. Press TAB or Shift-TAB to move the highlight to the area that contains folders and files and then up and down arrows. Press space to go into a directory. Use shift-TAB (just because its faster, you can use TAB if you prefer) to highlight the area at the ...


0

Shift+F10 worked in my case. I guess the need of Fn depends on the keyboard you are using. P.S. I used this combination on a file in Nautilus (Ubuntu 14.04 LTS).



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