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Assuming you are talking about English (US, international with dead keys), that keyboard layout turns the quotation symbol key to a dead_diaeresis key for typing e.g. ë. To type the quotation symbol you need to press both <AltGr> and <Shift>. The dot key should be unchanged, though. You can see an overview of the currently selected keyboard ...


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Please ignore my other post I inadvertently ignored the first rule of fault finding, only change one thing at a time. Ubuntu 14.04 wine 1.8 sketchup 2016. Shortcuts called by keyboard strokes stop working reliably when the default tray in sketchup is brought up with the instructor enabled. The workaround is to disable the instructor in the tray selector menu....


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Open terminal by pressing CTRL+ALT+T Enter the command below. sudo apt-get remove unity-lens-music Enter the root password when prompted. Now goto Settings > keyboard > shortcuts > Navigation > Hide all normal windows and assign the Super+M keys


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I ran into this problem too, my solution, however, was different. IntelliJ has different Keymaps, which you can change according to your OS. You can change your IntelliJ Keymap from the settings. Just go to Settings -> Keymap and select your desired keymap from the dropdown. In my case, I chose "Default for GNOME" since I am using Ubuntu 16.04 Gnome.


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If you like to change the keyboard shortcuts of various operations then you can do it through settings. Please follow the following steps. Go to the system settings. Click on "text entry." Now go to the bottom right corner of the dialogue box and click on "keyboard settings." There you will find the list of various shortcuts and what they do. You can ...


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In Xubuntu, keyboard shortcut settings can be find in this path: Settings→Settings Manager→Window Manager→Keyboard


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I had the same issue and I finally resolved it. Since there is no way to solve this with Xfce alone, one needs the small tool ksuperkey. It was originally developed for KDE, but it works fine on other desktops. You basically install ksuperkey or compile it yourself, and bind your menu to "alt+f1". Once you run ksuperkey, the superkey will behave as one would ...


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Intro The script below serves to resize windows to 1/3 of the screen width, and place them to either left, center, or right position.There are numeric options, 0 for left, 1 for center, and 2 for right. The script relies on xdotool so make sure to install that with sudo apt-get install xdotool. In Unity, the script must operate on unmaximized windows. The ...


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Use Geany IDE. Some drawbacks but central things work like Search in Files, ... LaTeX component found for the IDE. I think the keybinding can be customized there.


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In Ubuntu 16.04 one can choose from two English keyboard layouts by clicking on En1 or En2 at the top right corner of the screen. @character can be obtained in the standard way shift + 2 by choosing En2 layout, which is the US English layout.


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Generally, you can add a keyboard shortcut from Settings > Keyboard, then select any tab that has the word 'Shortcut'. However, because you haven't mention your distribution, I can only offer help with Ubuntu, Ubuntu Gnome and Xubuntu, as those are the ones I have experience with. I cannot offer any explanation for the sound ork instant sleeping mode though. ...


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These actions already exist for the Window Manager of XFCE/Xubuntu, it's a matter of binding them to proper keys! You can do this through the GUI. Just go to Settings, Window Manager, and click the Shortcuts tab. The actions you are looking for are named Tile window to the left, Tile window to the top-right, etc.


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GNOME stores its settings in the dconf binary database which can also be viewed or changed with the gsettings command line tool or the dconf-editor app. The database is stored in ~/.config/dconf/user . You can copy that file to another computer to copy all of your GNOME settings including your keyboard shortcuts. That folder is hidden by default. Use the ...


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I am using wine 1.8 ubuntu 14.04 and sketchup 2016 64bit. I had loads of trouble getting keyboard input to work properly for shortcuts. I had to hit a key multiple times or hold it down so it repeats. I changed the windows version to 10 in wine configure for sketchup and it now works as it should.


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I am running Ubuntu 16.04 and what was happening is when I used these key strokes (ctrl-alt-left/right), the window was resizing and placing itself to the right or left of my screen. I tried disabling these key bindings in: Settings/Keyboard/Navigation, even though I don't have workspaces enabled. It still didn't prevent the behavior I was seeing. ...


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The following script checks if Xfce4 Terminal is running. If it is not, the script exits. This script uses arguments, script-name --in to zoom in and script-name --out to zoom out. It will work for any font type. (Different font types have a different number of words.) I named my script terminal-zoom, and I am using Ctrl Alt + for terminal-zoom --in and ...


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I found a solution here: As I noticed from xev output pressing prt sc on HP Pavilion returns two different codes: 218(the key's code itself) and XKeysymToKeycode returns 107. I looked at key mapping with xmodmap -pke and noticed that there's binding 107 to Print action but there's no binding for 218 keycode. So I just add binding for keycode 218: ...


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This seems to still be an active issue. I found a solution for Studio Ubuntu 14.04 that should work for other xubuntus: Set your file manager to "show hidden files" Navigate to ~/.config/xfce4/xfconf/xfce-perchannel-xml/ Open xfce4-keyboard-shortcuts.xml in a text editor Look for two lines: <property name="<Alt>Tab" type="empty"> should be ...


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Take a look at xbindkeys. Create at $HOME/.xbindkeysrc and make sure to launch xbindkeys on startup. "COMMAND IN HERE" F5 If you need to emulate another key press with the F5 key, look into xdotool. I unfortunately don't have much experience with that one.


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Add 'caps:ctrl_modifier' to the value of org.gnome.desktop.input-sources xkb-options in gsettings, for example gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.input-sources xkb-options "['compose:ralt', 'caps:ctrl_modifier']" You can use gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.input-sources xkb-options "$(gsettings get org.gnome.desktop.input-sources xkb-options | sed "s/]/, '...


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Well there is a magic key combination (to reboot): While holding Alt and the SysReq (Print Screen) keys, type REISUB For more details visit this answer : http://askubuntu.com/a/36717/497359


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Switch to the console: CTRL + ALT + F1 After login, you can see which processes are running using this command: ps -ef If you see a process which has high CPU usage, you can kill it. sudo kill <pid> Of course, you can simply restart the PC too: sudo reboot


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KP stands for KeyPad. In this case it's the keypad's right pointer.


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You can also add the show desktop icon to the panel in Xubuntu (tested in 16.04, but I'm hoping it works in 14.04 too), as follows: Right-click an empty space on the panel Choose Panel → Add New Items... Search for Show desktop Select it and click Add Now you have the show desktop icon to click on. I like to right click it and go to Move, then I move it ...


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I finally got it working. Kinda disappointed that after four months, I finally answer it myself. I was right; it was the different name causing the problem. All the instructions I've been trying for over a year should have worked... but no instructions on any other help/request page, or Digimend tell you to match the pen and pad names from xinput to the ...


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Ubuntu 16.04 setxkbmap -option <OPTION> from Wernight's answer seemed to work immediately for me. However it would go away on reboot. To address this I added to my startup applications Search for and run Startup Applications >> Click Add Put in /usr/bin/setxkbmap -option <OPTION> as the command (Note: the full path is important) Replace &...


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Run this command in termial (ctrl+alt+t): xmodmap -e 'add mod3 = Scroll_Lock' However, you have to do that each time you open a session. Therefore, I suggest you define this command as a startup application, so that it's run automatically upon login :)


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Not sure if it's the same in Ubuntu, but in Debian KDE it goes like this: System Settings -> Shortcuts & Gestures -> Global Keyboard Shortcuts -> KDE Daemon (from drop down list) -> Switch Display - map to Win + P or whatever you want.


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You want to define a compose key. I use Caps Lock for that. In preferences, go to Keyboard » Shortcut » Typing and change the Compose Key entry with any key you'd like. I suggest Caps Lock unless you use it often to write in capitals? Once that is setup you do: Compose Key + < + C → Č Compose Key + ' + o → ó Compose Key + ' + e → é In most ...


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Figured it out. I was using Maté before; and Compiz was my preferred window manager. So, I had it set up to run "compiz --replace" on startup. KDE doesn't need it, of course; and when it ran, it hijacked keyboard shortcuts. Now that I've disabled it, everything's running smoothly.


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There are multiple ways to type special characters in X11 which handles keyboard input on most Linux/Ubuntu desktop systems: Look up the key combination for the current layout (Where to find complete AltGr symbols map per keyboard layout). For each shown key the symbol in the left-hand bottom can be accessed with only that key, the right-hand bottom can ...


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The difference in short black'n'white text: Options in GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX are always effective. Options in GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT are effective ONLY during normal boot (NOT during recovery mode).


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It is Alt + F4. Hold the Super key to see a list of commonly used keyboard shortcuts.



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