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0

As long as the bash manual is not modified in a way to make this command improper(which is not very likely), the following command will show all default shortcuts for bash. man bash|grep -A294 'Commands for Moving' This gives an output which looks like Commands for Moving beginning-of-line (C-a) Move to the start of the current line. ...


0

1 - System Settings → Appearance 2 - 3 - run on command: gsettings get com.canonical.Unity.Launcher favorites 4 - copy the given list and delete 'unity://desktop-icon' 5 - run on command: gsettings set com.canonical.Unity.Launcher favorites [GIVEN LIST WITHOUT 'unity://desktop-icon'] 6 - CompizConfig → General Options → Key Bindings 7 - Set "Show ...


1

Here is a method that works without run-one assuming wmctrl is available: wmctrl -xa terminator.Terminator || terminator This assumes the default window class name is being used. You can get creative if you want and use a custom class name when launching terminator. This will allow you to keep your terminator shortcut separate from a normal terminator ...


0

You need to enable the secondary click (as AliNa commented) with gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.a11y.mouse secondary-click-enabled "true" or with dconf editor. Then it is possible that Ubuntu handles the touchscreen partially like a touchpad, where a touch does not trigger mouse-press. Instead you need to short-tap + touch-and-hold.


-2

In german it's the "Ö" button ;D


2

ccsm is the compiz-config-settings-manager, it can be installed with sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager This is where the compiz settings can be configured. So, just open it, either from the dash or by running ccsm, go into the scale or expo applet settings and choose your keybindings.


0

Most of the keyboard shortcuts in blender can be customised. All editable shortcuts are listed in the user preferences under input. The menu next to the search field allows you to search by name or key-binding. For Alt+RightClick search for mouse in keybinding. I doubt any mouse clicks will conflict though as they are clicks in the blender window for it to ...


3

Open System Settings and navigate to Keyboard -> Shortcuts. Open the "System" section, click on "Lock screen" and press Backspace. This will disable the system lock screen shortcut. Now click the + button. A dialog will pop up asking for your input. Add a custom name and put: gnome-screensaver-command -la in the "command" field. Click ...


2

This was tested on 13.10+, type the following on the terminal: sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration You will see the keyboard configuration. Press ENTER 5 times to skip all keyboard related options except for the Kill X part. When you get to the Kill X option which looks like this: Select YES and press enter. Wait a bit while everything ...


2

For 14.04 There's also this Nautilus script you could use instead of the dedicated extension: #!/usr/bin/perl -w # # Open terminal here # # Nautilus script that opens a gnome-terminal at the current location, if it's # a valid one. This could be done in shell script, but I love Perl!. # # 20020930 -- Javier Donaire <jyuyu@fraguel.org> # ...


1

After installing nautilus-open-terminal, ensure that you have killed all nautilus processes (there's always one non visible nautilus process running, so use pgrep nautilus to find them and use then use the kill command). Then if you launch nautilus, you should see the Open in Terminal if you right-click in the list of files, like I did in the screenshot ...


1

Cinnamon is closely related to Gnome, and there Control-Space is commonly used to switch between key maps for different languages, like US and French. Take a look at the keyboard setup, there should be section with a large count of special keyboard options. Somewhere there I you can choose another hotkey instead of Control-Space to switch keyboard ...


0

This kinda worked for me but after the screensaver is ended all the sound was dead. Then I had to figure out how to restart the pulseaudio server to get any sound working again. I'm still running Lucid 10.04LTS with 2.6.32-58-generic


1

In my Lenovo G500 and there's a setting in the BIOS for this - see the screenshot below. If you don't have this you may need to update your BIOS from here. It's dated March 2014 so it's pretty recent (this is for Win 8.1). You can see from the description in the screenshot that it does exactly what you want.


1

Undo it's like this : ctrl + _


0

This below shortcut key does the job of undo the erased string by ctrl+w, ctrl+y


1

Okay I've got a way to get the list of shortcuts by filtering the bash manual. It will also give the description what exactly each shortcut does. Thanks to Sparhawk who enlightened me to find the solution. What I needed was to learn the use of regular expressions although I'm still not good in it :) So here is the one line command: man bash | grep ...


3

The following command gives a nice columnar output showing the use and shortcuts. bind -P|grep "can be found"|sort | awk '{printf "%-40s", $1} {for(i=6;i<=NF;i++){printf "%s ", $i}{printf"\n"}}' This gives an output, which looks like abort "\C-g", "\C-x\C-g", "\e\C-g". accept-line "\C-j", ...


0

For the moment use alt+windows key I'm searching for this also Found this but don't work on ubuntu 12: http://blenderartists.org/forum/showthread.php?280952-Help!-I-broke-Ubuntu-by-disabling-alt-key-mouse-modifier Edit:found it open terminal and copy paste this gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.wm.preferences mouse-button-modifier "<Super>"


-1

it's easy, you just have to click Edit->Keyboard Shortcuts on menubar Terminal and you'll get all of keyboard shortcuts. See this picture:


11

You can list all shortcuts in your current bash shell by doing bind -P e.g. bind -P | grep clear clear-screen can be found on "\C-l". To change them, you can do something like bind '\C-p:clear-screen' And put it in an init file to make it permanent (note you can only have a key combination bound to one thing at a time, so it will lose any binding it ...


9

The defaults are in man bash, along with details as to what each command does. See BroSlow's answer if you have changed your key bindings. Commands for Moving beginning-of-line (C-a) Move to the start of the current line. end-of-line (C-e) Move to the end of the line. forward-char (C-f) Move ...


1

Once you switch to a virtual "terminal" without a getty running, your keyboard input is not available, so trying to use it to switch back is useless. Come into your system via ssh, and kill the lightdm --session.... to get back to an X login screen.


0

Ctrl+Alt+F7 should get you back to the GUI. (I just tested this on xubuntu 12.04) Specifically, I hit Ctrl+Alt+F1 to get to the first terminal, then Ctrl+Alt+F7, which brings me back to the GUI.


0

I found a workaround that works: I put setxkbmap -option grp:ctrl_alt_toggle us,el in a text file click super key search for startup click on startup aplications Click add then browse, then look for the script and enter bash at the beggining of the command entry so you have something like bash /home/user/place/whereyou/saved/textfilename.sh Restart and ...


0

Xubuntu is great I highly recommend xfce over Unity. But Xubuntu uses xfce4 which has its own key shortcut mappings which are not controlled by "Ubuntu" as it is on the Unity desktop. There may be one in Settings > keyboard > shortcuts or Settings > Windows > Keyboard Shortcuts for disabling touchpad (I cannot verify this right now), or you can map whichever ...


4

First set the world "Terminal" to appear in the window title of your gnome-terminal. To do this, when you are in gnome-terminal go to Edit → Profile Preferences, select Title and Command tab and be sure that the field Initial title contain the word "Terminal": Second, add a new custom keyboard shortcut for the following command: bash -c "[[ \"$(cat ...


2

WinKey+Alt+Click works for me most of the times, although I'm not on Ubuntu, but on another Linux distro. WinKey is that key branded with the Redmond company logo.


0

A guess: The problem might be that the combination you select conflicts with a keyboard shortcut used by some other part of the system, e.g. Unity. You may want to try some other combination.


2

To switch only between tabs you can configure your own shortcut. This can be done in the following way: Go to Application Launcher → Settings → System Settings → Shortcut and Gestures → Global Keyboard Shortcuts Select KWin from the 'KDE component:' combo box The interested Action is 'Walk Through Windows Tabs' This tool is smart ...


0

I too was a bit puzzled about this, but it works: you have to type the command you want in the input field, then select "OK" in the dialog. Another dialog then appears: With this dialog selected you just have to type the shortcut on your keyboard you want to assign to the command.


0

I was able to restore the weblet and workspace switcher by switching the weblet and worspace-switcher OFF and ON again in cairo-dock settings. Even though I was unable to unminimize the windows, I was able to restore them by this procedure.


1

I've written a small program called jumpapp for exactly this purpose. It lets you create one keyboard shortcut to opens a new terminal the first time you press it, and to switch to the already open window any time you press it after that. As a bonus, if you have multiple terminal windows open, repeatedly pressing the shortcut will cycle through all the ...


0

Search cinnamon in synaptic and unintsall all installed packages. Then installing cinnamon with requested packages would solve problems.


0

Here is what you can try: Easy Method: After more research, I found an easier solution that should work: Simply type these three lines (in order) into terminal. The first one installs a tool that can reset unity, the second line resets unity, and the third line restarts unity. Give it a try and see if it works. sudo apt-get install dconf-tools dconf reset ...


5

If you look at the output of the following command: bind -l or better to: bind -l | grep arg you can see that doesn't exist any readline function for all arguments like is, for example, yank-last-arg for last argument - which can insert last argument to the previous command (the last word of the previous history entry). So, if such a function doesn't ...


0

Not sure if this is what you want, but these shortcuts have made my life a lot easier: Maximize left/right/fullscreen = Ctrl+WindowsButton+(left/right/up arrow) Move Window to different workspace = shift+Ctrl+alt+(arrows) Swich workspace = ctrl+alt+(arrows)


0

Install Compiz Config Setting Manager (ccsm): sudo apt-get install ccsm Look for Grid → Binding tab Set whatever shortcuts you like. I would suggest Ctrl+Alt+qwe,asd,zxd which seems good for a Qwerty keyboard. The only used one I can see is d to show desktop, but you can change it to to some thing else from Ubuntu Unity Plugin → General tab ...


0

Do you use unity? On 12.04 with gnome-session-fallback/gnome-classic fast moving windows with shift-left/right seems to work.



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