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1

The most useful tool would provide a simple way to list all current keybindings in sorted order. The answer from rods helps a lot! But dconf-editor doesn't seem to let us export the information, sort it, save it etc. The gsettings tool accesses the same dconf database from the command line. So far the best I've found is this: gsettings list-recursively ...


2

This page has an explanation on how to setup shortcuts Lubuntu/Keboard Relevant section says: There is no automatic way to create new keyboard shortcuts or hotkeys in lubuntu. You will either have to edit Lubuntu's openbox configuration file (~/.config/openbox/lubuntu-rc.xml) and edit, or alternatively install xbindkeys. Obkey will edit the ...


0

I had same problem, You simply put Your keyboard ps2 plug into a mouse socket, just switch it to the right socket (purple one).


1

The very "basic" version of what you are looking for would be: [Desktop Entry] Name=Show Exec=/bin/bash -c "sleep 0.25&&xdotool key Shift_L+Super_L+w" Type=Application How to use You would have to install xdotool (as mentioned by @Takkat): sudo apt-get install xdotool Then paste the code above into an empty file, save it as (e.g.): ...


-1

save the file as window.desktop and make it executable [Desktop Entry] Version=1.0 Name=name Comment=a comment Exec= the command to run Icon= the path to the icon Type=Application Categories=A you could probable find out the command that runs when you use the keyboard shortcut HERE OR BY or by asking a separate question along the lines of and look ...


1

Setting a new keyboard shortcut is possible (in Settings -> Keyboard -> Application shortcuts), but finding the right terminal command... xrandr can change the resolution, I know it works if you're using one monitor, it's man page could have more info on what you'd like to do, other answers advise using it...? Here's a clip from it's man page: ...


1

I have found here about Disper. See link for details. It can be installed from Synaptic or the terminal. The command to cycle between clone, extended, internal and external displays should be like this: disper --cycle-stages='-e : -c : -S : -s' --cycle In that case, it would extend to the right. To cycle between the same options but extend to the ...


0

The same thing happens to me. Apparently, if you replace iBus with Fcitx it will fix the issue. Also, if you enter ibus restart from command line it will make it work again. I found this solution here Keybord input not work in Chromium 34 Ubuntu 14.04 aura (260972) [using Fcitx would avoid this issue]


2

First use the following command in your terminal: bind '"\ew": vi-forward-bigword' to create a new shortcut-key - Alt+w in this case - which will move the prompt forward to the end of the current or next word. In this case words (bigwords) are composed of letters, digits and special characters like ".". Now you can use Alt+w followed by Ctrl+w to ...


0

Make sure that xev reports key events when pressing and releasing the windows key. Run xev and when you press the super key you should see something like this: KeyPress event, serial 27, synthetic NO, window 0x2000001, root 0x25, subw 0x0, time 378034015, (-1,97), root:(515,117), state 0x0, keycode 89 (keysym 0xffeb, Super_L), same_screen YES, ...


1

The answer to show all key bindings in Ubuntu / Unity is: gsettings list-recursively org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings | sort | more However Alt+F1 is not in there, meaning it's hard-coded in Unity and cannot be changed. (Sorry to be the harbinger of bad news)


0

I have a basic PC keyboard, a Logitech K120, and it also does not have media buttons. I have tried setting the Print Screen, Scroll Lock, and Pause/break keys to Mute, Volume down, and Volume up; in Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. They all were recognized and added to the configuration, but the Scroll Lock key for the Volume Down did not work. Print Screen and ...


1

have you tried checking the "input" under system settings? I don't have it in front of me but I believe the tab "gestures and shortcuts" would solve your problem. Or just hit "restore default settings (on that tab, not the whole system)". Other than that you would have to find the folder and file for your keyboard mapping. Also check to see if they changed ...


1

Fn× handled by BIOS/Firmware. Some vendors provide a way to customize them with limited options. If you are comparing with MS Windows, some vendors supplies tools with their binary drivers that can talk to BIOS some how. CtrlAltF× are console keys that need to be handled in the early boot stage. Try January's answer in Change Default TTY ...


0

I have Tux-J and Tux-K mapped to Up and Down in KDE, it is relevant for all applications. It is actually rather easy to configure. Go here: System Settings -> Custom Shorcuts -> Preset Actions Now right-click Preset Actions and choose New -> Global Shortcut -> Send Keyboard Input Call the new shortcut VIM-J In the Trigger tab click the Shortcut ...


2

Try setting it using Compiz, after disabling it from System Settings → Keyboard → Shortcuts tab: Install ccsm sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager Run it and enable Commands plugin Set it the command in Commands tab & shortcut in Key Bindings tab Actually, setting custom shortcut from System Setting works too for me. ...


3

Open the Terminal and execute the following command: dconf write /org/compiz/profiles/unity/plugins/unityshell/show-launcher '"<Alt>space"' To read the current value, use read option: dconf read /org/compiz/profiles/unity/plugins/unityshell/show-launcher If you want to set it to default value, use reset option as following: dconf reset ...


1

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX Entries on this line are added to the end of the 'linux' command line (GRUB legacy's "kernel" line) for both normal and recovery modes. It is used to pass options to the kernel. GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT This line imports any entries to the end of the 'linux' line (GRUB legacy's "kernel" line). The entries are appended to ...


2

Read about Keybindings dconf-editor dconf-editor > org > gnome > desktop > wm > keybindings Key bindings are now stored in the dconf registry. You can install dconf-editor to be able to view and edit them: sudo add-apt-repository universe sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install dconf-tools or if you have universe repositories ...


-1

I got the same problem today. I wrote a small script to convert the old keybindings to the new interface. #!/bin/bash # Delete old new-style keybindings gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.media-keys custom-keybindings "[]" gconftool-2 -R /desktop/gnome/keybindings | while read LINE; do read BINDINGLINE read ACTIONLINE read ...


0

This works for me : 1) Edit /etc/default/grub and change this variable: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="pcie_aspm=force acpi_osi=Linux acpi_backlight=legacy" 2) Edit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf and add this line at the end of the file: blacklist toshiba_acpi 3) Update the grub config file: sudo update-grub 4.) Reboot. http://askubuntu.com/a/450357


0

Test this: Open Xfce 4 Settings Manager --- Menu --- Settings --- Xfce 4 Settings Manager Click on the Keyboard icon. Switch to the Layout tab. Untick Use system defaults Click the Add button and choose the appropriate keymap from the list. Select the active layout. If you need to switch between different layouts, installing the Xfce panel keyboard ...


0

Launching SSH at boot (alongside firefox and teamviewer) then running the command sudo pkill -KILL -u user returned to login screen, to which I can connect teamviewer and continue use.


0

From one of my older answers: First you have to install xdotool: sudo apt-get install xdotool I made up a series of commands to show us the passive grabs on a keystroke. For example to see what is grabbing the Shift+PrintScreen combo, you can use the below "script": xdotool keydown "shift+Print"; xdotool key "XF86LogGrabInfo"; xdotool keyup "Print"; ...


0

Look at this: where-does-ubuntu-store-its-keyboard-shortcut-configuration or this: Keybindings (wiki.ubuntu.com) or this: where-does-ubuntu-store-keyboard-shortcut-settings (superuser.com) There are described several locations e.g. in dconf or gconf where Unity stores its shortcuts. Maybe you would like to check these pages for any new information?


0

XUBUNTU xfce4-volumed patched for pulse audio server https://launchpad.net/xfce4-volumed-pulse Default behaviour expected 5 steps; with the following command drops to 1: xfconf-query -c xfce4-mixer -n -p /volume-step-size -s 1 -t uint Thanks to IRC #xfce-dev (ali1234)


3

Which Ubuntu version do you use? At least on 14.04 gufw already comes with a desktop file, /usr/share/applications/gufw.desktop. These are its contents: [Desktop Entry] Version=1.0 Name=Firewall Configuration Comment=An easy way to configure your firewall Categories=GNOME;GTK;Settings;Security;X-GNOME-Settings-Panel;X-GNOME-SystemSettings; ...


0

"According to Mac OS X's Keyboard Viewer, it's option-\ (the key under delete)." Source is using a Norwegian keyboard too.


1

I solved this by editing the window matching field in the CompizConfig Settings Manager. I don't think it's installed by default, but it's easy to find in Software Center. Once you have the Settings Manager, go to: Window Management > Scale > Behaviour > Scale Windows This field accepts a string that conforms to Compiz's WindowMatching syntax. You can edit ...


0

Have you ever tried Ctrl+F4 in Firefox? Check out that first. There the shortcut have already been assigned for the same purpose which you have asked for. The shortcut key works in my firefox by default. For your information, the shortcut key works in Chrome too and you could use Ctrl+W to close the current tab in either browser.


0

Install Customizable shortcuts for Firefox. (Its an extension) https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/customizable-shortcuts/ In preferences change the Tab closing shortcut. This might Do.


0

Open terminal and type: sudo nano 85-keyboard-configuration.rules Make changes to make your file look like this: # Set up a single virtual console. SUBSYSTEM=="tty", KERNEL=="tty[1-6]", RUN+="console-setup-tty /dev/%k", ATTR{[dmi/id]product_name}=="SATELLITE L750*" # Framebuffer console created. Set up the font on all virtual consoles # ...


0

Format Paintbrush is your friend: You can set a (custom) shortcut key to it if you don‘t like clicking it: from the menu, choose Tools - Customize - Keyboard tab (a document must be opened)


1

I'm hunting the same functionality and found in the shortcuts/KWin settings: quick tile window to the left/right will maximize it to the left/right. It doesn't look like top/bottom functionality exists. https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=310005 Window to Next/Previous Screen works for moving windows to other monitors. I'm hoping to find more, but ...


0

You can do a 'backspace' on your Macbook air. Simply press Fn+ Delete to get a Backspace. It should be the same no matter what OS you are using. Hope it helps.


-1

Cite from Community Help Wiki - Keyboard Shortcuts Laptop Function Shortcuts Many laptops have function Fn keys which you can hold down to access more functions on the laptop's keyboard. A list of these functions should be available from the manufacturer of the laptop. Text Entry Shortcuts If you want to have quick access to lines of ...


0

Some laptops will swap the fn hotkeys around meaning pressing the fn key and any f1-f12 key is really the f keys and not the alternate keys so not pressing the fn key gives you the alternate keys like adjusting the volume and brightness. If a f key is assigned to put it to sleep by the os and you hit fn and that f key it will put to sleep and pressing the fn ...


0

I don't know anything about keybinding but here is a quick fix open the terminal and type xrandr -q | grep " connected" then to change the screen brightness enter xrandr --output LVDS1 --brightness 0.0 0.0 can be anything from 0.0 to 2.0


0

Try installing wicd sudo apt-get install wicd and completely remove network-manager sudo apt-get remove --purge network-manager-gnome network-manager it fixed all Wi-fi problems on my Acer C720 including yours.


1

(I always used to wonder why you could answer your own question. I guess I just found out.) I recently discovered a method to do this on Compiz desktops. If you are using Unity, you can use Sneetsher's answer. However I am using a Compiz based desktop so that doesn't apply to me, but it can be done. First, download the audio file you want to have it play. ...


0

I found here that using: shift+f10 opens the context menu. I know it's not the best solution but I thought it could help for temporary use! P.S: I have e530c too, and I tested this on Debian 7 (Wheezy).


0

SOLVED! Yayayayay I think the problem was the vim emulator. When I install intellij I installed all of the plugins that show up when you install cus lol. So I re-installed without any plugins and it works!


0

Here the steps: Open up Terminal Type sudo gedit /etc/default/keyboard Modify XKBOPTIONS="" to XKBOPTIONS="numpad:microsoft" Save and exit the editor Reboot the system to take the changes in effect. I hope the issue will now be solved.


0

The solution is as follows: after copying and pasting something within Emacs, just press Option+Alt+K in Emacs, then I could again copy and paste a text from Mac to Emacs by Command+C then Command+V or Ctrl+V...


0

Sure you can ask this question on this site. :) You can do this: 1. Open up System Settings. 2. Choose Keyboard. 3. Go to the tab Shortcuts. 4. Remove any shortcuts you do not want. This may not work for the WiFi key though. EDIT You could also try seeing if there's an option in the BIOS to change them. When you start your computer, at the very first ...


0

Here the steps: Create a script file that starts the line #!/bin/bash followed by your command given in the question. sudo apt-get install xbindkeys Type: printf '"bash $HOME/bin/left.sh"\n Control+Alt+A\n' > ~/.xbindkeysrc printf '"bash $HOME/bin/right.sh"\n Control+Alt+F\n' >> ~/.xbindkeysrc xbindkeys Now, check out if it does work. I ...



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