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1

gpick has the following issues: It does not terminate itself after picking a color is done (you already know that) If you copy something to the clipboard and then kill it, you'll have an empty clipboard. So the first thing to do is to install a clipboard manager that will offer Clipboard persistence, open a terminal and type the following command: sudo ...


2

You can find the definition of all XF86 keys here: http://cgit.freedesktop.org/xorg/proto/x11proto/tree/XF86keysym.h (or installed on your system in /usr/include/X11/XF86keysym.h, if you installed x11proto-core-dev) To run it from the terminal, just install xdotool: sudo apt-get install xdotool and run: xdotool key XF86AudioRaiseVolume


0

This worked in Ubuntu 13.10 gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.default-applications.terminal exec terminator


1

I'm guessing that you might have installed a third-party program that interrupts the shortcut. If you installed anything weird, try uninstalling it. You might want to check out your keys and see if they are working properly physically. It might not be Ubuntu's fault. If all else fails, you could always use Xubuntu 14.04 (or Xfce on Ubuntu) instead. Alt+tab ...


0

xbindkeys is good, and I still use it for other functions; however, you could also go to settings -> accessibility -> simulated second click. This allows you holding the left click, long enough, to provoke the right click. I was looking for a faster approach when I found this article; however, it is still ~1 second wait, even on the shortest interval ...


2

If refreshing is tricky, we can restart Nautilus: pkill nautilus nautilus -n Your Startup Applications entry can be easily modified to add these commands as well, as part of script, by chaining: udisks --mount ... && pkill -u nautilus && nautilus -n Nautilus has a -q option to make it quit by itself, but this doesn't work well with ...


0

I found a bug report on launchpad regarding this issue and it seems when reassigning the media keys some prefix is missing. The following lines are somewhat of a summary of what is discussed in bug report You can issue the following command to see your current keybinding: gsettings get org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.media-keys volume-up Output should ...


0

If you want to avoid the dialog from dpkg-reconfigure (e.g. configure multiple pcs): create the file /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/90-zap.conf with the content Section "InputClass" Identifier "keyboard defaults" MatchIsKeyboard "on" Option "XKbOptions" "terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp" EndSection (worked in 14.04) Found the answer at: ...


1

According to this image, you should have an insert key if you use fn and del. Alternatively, you should be able to use 0 as insert if you disable num lock. However, you should be able to get middle click emulation working, I am surprised it doesn't out of the box. The traditional way is to add this line to your /etc/X11/xorg.conf: Section "InputClass" ...


0

you can use ctrl+alt+7 (rather than ctrl+alt+f7) and alt+f7. you can change the default ubuntu keymap setting by setting->keyboard-> shortcuts->windows->move windows change "move window" shortcut and use alt+f7 in android studio. it works.


0

The Trick is to Keep Alt Pressed when using the commands... Have been working on Ubuntu for 2 years..Except for selection on Filters using Space bar..no issues. PS : Macros do not work in Wine..


0

I have this same issue in Ubuntu 14.04. I was able to work around it seemingly adequately with keyboard shortcuts, binding super+1, super+2 etc to empty commands (I'm using a space). These keybindings don't seem to execute even when the command is not empty, but now when I hit super+1 it seems to behave normally but as a single key event, rather than "super ...


4

Because it's specified in POSIX, the IEEE norm for Unix-like computer systems. Check Section 10.2 - Output Devices and Terminal Types of the POSIX.1 2008 (the latest) specification for all the shortcuts available. To add up to your question, this is a brief explanation of what those shortcuts actually do. When you press Ctrl-[letter], you are actually ...


1

+z and +c are shell signals. ctrl+z is not killing the programm, it is sending it a signal (SIGTSTP) to suspend. Type fg to resume it. ctrl+c is another signal, this time the SIGINT to terminate. kbd+x is just a nano key binding.


0

I find Alt + right-click + drag to be the most convenient way to do this.


1

From CCSM (install the compizconfig-settings-manager package if you don't have it): Ubuntu Unity Plugin → Switcher → Uncheck "Bias alt-tab to prefer windows on the current viewport"


0

I've tried a number of proposed solutions (for Ubuntu 14.04), however this worked for me. From a terminal type (or copy paste.. Note you need to use Ctrl+Shift+V to paste in to a terminal); gsettings reset org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.media-keys volume-up gsettings reset org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.media-keys volume-down gsettings reset ...


0

Try this shortcut key Alt+prt sc


0

It's a confirmed bug. https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/gnome-terminal/+bug/1292113 I've had the same thing happening. Sometimes, after a minute or two of doing something else, a screen full of terminals I attempted to open with a series of frustrated ctrl+alt+ts blows up in my workspace. If you go to launchpad, and confirm that it also affects ...


-1

I found a useful tutorial here http://blacketernal.wordpress.com/set-up-key-mappings-with-xmodmap/ Quite simple solution with different approach, and it was solving my problem


3

You could emulate pressing the key with xdotool, if you can not find how to directly call the function it is mapped to: xdotool key F5 The difficult part is to do that when the current window is not the desktop. It should be possible to find it with th search command - but may need some experimenting; First, try to find the right window, using ...


0

You can configure HUD with help of gsettings: DESCRIPTION gsettings offers a simple commandline interface to GSettings.It lets you get, set or monitor an individual key for changes. To get current key run following command in terminal: $ gsettings get org.compiz.integrated show-hud ['<Alt>'] To change key (let Alt+Super) run following ...


2

I'm not sure if this is what you want, but you could do something like gsettings list-recursively | grep keybindings | grep '\[.\+\]' from the command line to, extract all the non-empty keybindings from the dconf database.


1

Shortcuts: System settings > Keyboard > /Shortcuts\ - is one place to look.


3

Generic solution using wmctrl Overview The following script should be compatible with all EWMH-compliant window managers (e.g. xfwm4, openbox, kwin, compiz...). It uses wmctrl and xprop, which can be installed with: sudo apt-get install x11-utils wmctrl Installation Copy and save the following passage as simple-window-switcher: #!/bin/bash # based ...


-1

Change the command to gksu grub-reboot 4


4

Inspired by Pineau's answer, I found a dirty trick to get it done: keep Alt+` for switching between application windows in one viewport, and (for example) Alt+1 to switch between application windows on all viewports. Minor cosmetic downside is that the responsiveness is a little less accurate, since the settings need a fraction of a second to change. In ...


1

If you want to add a new Hotkey, for example when you press Shift+F1 call F1 commands, you will need an extra softwae as xbindkeys: xdotool or xte. I follow by using xte. 1. Install xbindkeys: sudo apt-get install xbindkeys 2. Then install xte: sudo apt-get install xautomation The syntax for xte is like this: xte 'command ...


1

When you press the F1 key it opens the system documentation browser (yelp). You can for instance, access the Nautilus help with: yelp help:ubuntu-help/files From yelp man pages: NAME yelp — browse system documentation USAGE yelp [file] The GNOME Help Browser includes detailed documentation for the majority of applications, ...


4

Open a Terminal and type the following command: dconf write /org/compiz/profiles/unity/plugins/unityshell/alt-tab-bias-viewport false Alternatively you can install the Unity Tweak Tool: sudo apt-get install unity-tweak-tool unity-tweak-tool Then enable the Switch between windows on all workspaces option in the Switcher Tab:


1

"xdotool key --delay 0 --clearmodifiers ctrl+c" Control + q + Release Source: http://www.ict.griffith.edu.au/anthony/info/X/event_handling.txt (search for 'Generating X Keyboard Events')


2

The easiest way is to install xdotool, with which you can a.o. simulate key (combinations) and mouseclicks. sudo apt-get install xdotool then open System Settings > Keyboard > Shortcuts > Custom Shortcuts, set a key combination you like, and make it run the command: xdotool click 3


0

Step 1:     Download Autokey from either the Ubuntu Software Center or use the terminal: sudo apt-get install autokey-gtk Step 2:     Open Autokey (search AutoKey in dash menu) Step 3:     Create a New Top-Level Folder from File ► New ► Folder Step 4:     Select Folder and create New Script ...


-2

Try the following; system settings keyboard shortcuts there are many options there to set all sorts of key combinations. Sorry, I see now you've already tried that. I just went and tried it myself and it works; if you select the shortcut you want to change and click on it the words "new accellerator" appear, you then hold the super key and whichever you ...


-2

In my case I would make a script: bin Case window = true in /Home/picture Bash --window --remove-border -f ''~/picture/screenshot_$(date+%X_%H:$M:$:$S:$N).png'' end case and it might work Fine This Way by typing in the terminal: sudo sh /path/name.sh


0

You can also use Clipit. You can find it into official Ubuntu repositories. It has a combination of hotkeys to use in Preferences. Look at the picture below -->


1

I use Diodon (available from the Software Centre). It keeps a clipboard history of strings that you can access at any moment by pressing Ctrl+Alt+V; you can then select which entry to insert using the arrow keys. You can also change the key combination from Ctrl+Alt+V to something else.


1

gnome-terminal shortcuts can also be customized, which is very easy and useful, if you use different applications that ought to have set the same shortcut(s) [applies only to the current active application] for the same/similar function(s). Example: Closing tabs with Ctrl+w shortcut in gnome-terminal and geany (text-editor) In "gnome-terminal" under "Edit" ...


3

The keyboard shortcuts field in Unity works in a similar manner to .desktop files, i.e. commands are executed without any form of subshell or variable expansion and can't access any environment variables. I wasn't able to find an official specification regarding the keyboard shortcuts menu but I think it's save to assume that command execution follows ...


0

It's too simple just Use X (Uper case) instead of x and Put %X_%H:%M:%S:%N into double ' ' Like this: "File_Path&Name_$(date +'%X_%H:%M:%S:%N').png" Instead of your's: "File_Path&Name_$(date +%x_%H:%M:%S:%N).png" Also the right one is "File_Path&Name_$(date)" + "%X_%H:%M:%S:%N.png". I don't know about %X and %N although ...


5

A keyboard shortcut like this doesn't exist by default, but you can use the bash built-in bind to define one. Just add the following section to your ~/.bashrc: # define function that opens default FM in working directory fmhere(){ xdg-open "$PWD" } # bind hotkey to it (<Alt><Shift><F>) bind -x '"\eF":"fmhere"' \eF is the terminal ...



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