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Apps settings are saved on hidden files in user home. Usually in ".config". Use "la" command to see hidden files. I will test copy ".config" and ".local" to your USB: cp -Rf ~/.config ~/.local /path-to-USB/home/user Maybe you will need more files. When you finish your script, you can use udev to copy files when USB is connected: Add a new file called: ...


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Install CompizConfig: sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager Then run it from the dash and look for the section called key bindings or something similar. Look for the one that opens the terminal, and you can change the keybindings there.


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I was able to successfully override the Ctrl+Shift+c shortcut by using the Shortcut Manager plugin and creating a new shortcut for the key combination. You can then reassign it to trigger a host of pre-configured actions, or any javascript / bookmarklet code of your choosing. I don't really have any experience with javascript, so I can't really figure out ...


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Ctrl + Alt + Num (keypad) control where you want your windows.


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I had this problem and it was driving me absolutely insane. If you want to keep using the vim plugin, and have ^c and ^v work for copy / paste like it does in other applications, then you need to go to your settings, and select Other Settings / Vim Emulation (as shown below).... Then make sure that both ^c and ^v are set to be handled by the IDE (not ...


0

In terminal enter: gedit ~/.inputrc Then copy paste and save: "\e[A": history-search-backward "\e[B": history-search-forward "\e[C": forward-char "\e[D": backward-char From now on in terminal you can do incremental search, All you need to do to find a previous command is to enter say the first two or three letters and upward arrow will take you there ...


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Add the commands in your $HOME/.Xmodmap file: keycode 104 = ISO_Level3_Shift keycode 169 = Delete keycode 134 = Menu Logout, login, that is!


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In my distro (Ubuntu 15.10), the shortcut is Ctrl + Alt + D. It was the same with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (From which I upgraded later).


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simple workaround without loosing meta: meta + z (u.s. layout) can be hit with just one finger at one


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Based on: http://superuser.com/a/516847/205010 Install gnome-tweak-tool: sudo apt-get install gnome-tweak-tool Open it: gnome-tweak-tool Go to Keyboard and Mouse and change Key Theme to Emacs


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Three ways to modify the F10 behaviour 1. Via terminal preferences Open your gnome-terminal and the Preferences Disable the entry Enable the menu accelerator key (F10 by default) 2. Via command line gsettings set org.gnome.Terminal.Legacy.Settings menu-accelerator-enabled false 3. Via dconf-editor Open the dconf-editor (sudo apt-get install ...


2

You can right-click on gnome-terminal window and uncheck "Show Menu" , and it will allow using F10 key. You can use alternative method for exiting programs,too. For htop you can use Q key to exit. For Midnight Commander or mc you can use the built-in command line to type exit there. Alternatively, you can switch to another terminal that doesn't rely on F ...


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some sites have >1 form. there are gazillion ways (and addons) to play around with your own personal shortcuts (in firefox, at least). to make these personal shortcuts effective, you'd probably want to tailor them to the websites you frequent on a per-site basis. if you are looking for sth more universal, are you familiar with the basic Tab and Shift Tab ...


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Go to Settings > Window Manager > Keyboard > Show Desktop. Double-click on it and change default shortcut.


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You can always use configuration editor like dconf-editor (sudo apt-get install dconf-editor), it'll automatically create default setting or a copy from another desktop setting (e.g. Ubuntu Desktop) if you happen to login on it for the first time. For manually edit window manager keybindings, it should be here: org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings, or just ...


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the first thing you could do is to check the shortcut settings. It's in the System Settings -> Keyboard -> Shortcuts Make sure it's still assigned to Ctrl + Alt + T And the second thing is to check the hardware, make sure these keys are working.


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Seems to be a bug. I'll explain how to get out of it... as long as you have both US and INTL (US International) input methods available, but first... Here's how I found it... (CAUTION: DON'T DO THIS IF YOU ARE NOT WILLING TO BE ANNOYED) First, go to US keyboard entry method, while having INTL also available. Now, hold the right Alt key, and press the shift ...


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I'm myself a KDE user, so I won't tell you exactly how to change the global shortcuts in Ubuntu, but I think this is what you are actually trying to do. The global shortcut for brightness change is assigned to XF86MonBrightnessUp/Down and you should be able to change it to whatever else you want, e.g. Ctrl+F5/6. This guide seems to be describing how to do ...


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You could also take a look to CopyQ on GitHub, it can manage (among lot of things) multiple clipboard organized through tabs. CopyQ monitors system clipboard and saves its content in customized tabs. Saved clipboard can be later copied and pasted directly into any application. Items can be: edited with internal editor or with preferred ...


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Go to your home directory. $cd ~ $ls -a You can see .gconf directory. If you remove this directory you will come back to your default desktop settings. rm -rf .gconf/ Restart It is an easier way of resetting back to your default desktop configuration. I hope this works for you.


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You don't need a startup application for that. Use the GUI independent way. Open the file ~/.Xmodmap nano ~/.Xmodmap Place your mappings, eg.: keycode 133 = Caps_Lock in this file and test it with xmodmap ~/.Xmodmap Then open the file ~/.xinitrc nano ~/.xinitrc and add this lines if [ -s ~/.Xmodmap ]; then xmodmap ~/.Xmodmap fi If ...


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This will run xmodmap -e "keycode 133 = Caps_Lock" command everytime launch Ubuntu (StartUp) Open your startup application by run following command : gnome-session-properties Select "add" button : Fill "command" section with xmodmap -e "keycode 133 = Caps_Lock" command UPDATE Chrome has it own shortcut that can you use if you lazy to use mouse. ...


0

Use xbindkeys.. sudo apt-get install xbindkeys Xbindkeys is a very versatile program that lets you remap keys very easily. It uses a config file, my default located in your home directory, to change key bindings into certain commands. To create a default config file you use the command: xbindkeys --defaults Which prints the default config file. So if ...


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In Ubuntu 14.04 System Settings -> Keyboard -> Shortcuts -> Typing And define the "Alternative Character Key" I used Right Ctrl Key. Combine this key with Q or 2. Result: @


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Ctrl + Alt + F1 gives you the CLI version of your OS. Enter your username when it says login: and you will be prompted for password. Proceed to type the commands as you do in a normal terminal and things should be fine. You can switch back to graphical mode by pressing Ctrl + Alt + F7/F8 Here is a Link to one of the answers to your problem


2

You could use gnome-shell-extensions-gpaste, available in the Universe Repository. sudo apt-get install gnome-shell-extensions-gpaste But there is no shortcut to get a concrete entry from the history. You have to mark the entry manually if you need another one then the last. So it's only half an answer. An idea is, to simulate the behavior (In my case I ...


0

If you use the altgr-intl keyboard layout, AltGr+w produces å.


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Use "compose key", it is Shift + Alt Gr (Right Alt) and then in your case a will produce å. You might have to press a twice.


0

Opt + Tab will switch between windows of different applications running. CTRL + Tab will switch between windows within the same application. At least this is how it is running Ubuntu on my Macbook.


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You can switch between navigating the side pane and the main window (using the arrow keys) by pressing the F6 key. So, F6 + arrow keys : Navigate main window F6 + up/down : Navigate side pane or vice versa.


1

Since I cannot add an upvote or a comment i'll just do a repeat of Rick's answer but now in a different laptop running ubuntu 14.04. Here's the set up Acer Aspire V5 Ubuntu 14.04 (updated several times) Linux Kernel 3.13.0-52-generic Intel graphics card All i had to do was to edit the default grub file in the configuration directory /etc and then ...


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Could this have to do with KDE? Quite possibly, although my first guess would be Ubuntu's general habit of replacing normal GTK+ UI with custom — and very, very broken — code. Case in point: the global menu, which was broken for YEARS for perfectly valid wxGTK code (affecting Audacity, Poedit and others) because they don't care much about compatibility. ...


0

I had this problem too, but with Gnome 3.10. After reading the @Sk8er, I found my mistake, the Key Theme should not be EMACS. To fix it: Run gnome-tweak-tool > Keyboard and Mouse > Key Theme Set the Key Theme value to Default.


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If you ever logged in with two users on the same machine or started gui on another tty1 with startx, you'd notice something like this: $ who xieerqi tty1 2015-07-31 22:17 xieerqi :0 2015-07-31 22:18 (:0) xieerqi pts/7 2015-07-31 22:18 (:0) Here I have 3 ...


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I just noticed on a brand new installation of ubuntu that only Alt + right arrow works. Could be the keyboard i guess but in case anyone else has this issue...try Alt + right arrow


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You can do this using setxkbmap. From man setxkbmap: The setxkbmap command maps the keyboard to use the layout determined by the options specified on the command line. To do this, open Keyboard from settings and click on Custom Shortcuts. Click on the + sign and add fill up the 'Custom Shortcut' windows as shown below: Press Apply. Click on ...


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You can quickly switch between your installed keyboard layout by pressing Super + space bar. For changing this keyboard shortcut go in : System settings > Text Entry. (sorry screenshot not in English)


2

I found a solution to my problem. I use the commands: sudo apt-get install xvkbd #to install the package xvkbd -xsendevent -text '\[Delete]' #to activate the correct key instead, it works great. I still don't know why the other method doesn't work for me.


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If you know the command to open the calculator, you should set the keyboard shortcut in compiz. You should probably not use the generic method offered by unity as this method is unreliable and the compiz method is very reliable. First, install ccsm: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager Now, press ALT + F2 type ccsm and ...



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