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In bash, the latest backround process' PID is stored in $!: nohup <command> & pid=$! To send a process a signal you can use kill: kill -<signal> <pid> Putting the pieces toghether, to start e.g. a background watch -n1 echo foo process and send it e.g. a SIGTERM signal later: nohup watch -n1 echo foo & pid=$! # ... kill -15 ...


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Don't use forever. It's dead easy. As you've already observed, forever is unnecessary here as runit already is a service manager, and is already starting and restarting your program. As you've also already observed, there are a few rules for what run programs must do. They must not fork and exit the main program. The runit service manager, like most ...


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Found my answer on ubuntuforums: In 10.04 Upstart jobs are defined in files placed in /etc/init. http://upstart.ubuntu.com/getting-started.html Had to look a bit better it appears :-P


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OpenVpn by default looks for .conf files not .opvn in /etc/openvpn/. Change the file extension to .conf then running the service should have no issues with finding the file and connecting If you installed the package from apt-get, it has the ability to start automaticly. Else, depending on the OS you are running there can be some differences is file ...


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Under systemd you create /etc/systemd/system/xvfb.service [Unit] Description=X Virtual Frame Buffer Service After=network.target [Service] ExecStart=/usr/bin/Xvfb :99 -screen 0 1024x768x24 [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target And then run sudo systemctl enable /etc/systemd/system/xvfb.service At which point sudo service xvfb start will start it: ...



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