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The Ubuntu security team will backport security fixes, if the version in a supported Ubuntu release is affected. You can keep an eye on this using the Ubuntu CVE Tracker. For example, a recent CVE (CVE-2014-8142) had Ubuntu 10.04's version of PHP marked as "not-affected". For issues which don't have an associated CVE, you could file a bug on the appropriate ...


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Is it possible to only install the security updates? Answer is yes. You can use unattended-upgrades which can handle automatic installation of security upgrades in Ubuntu system. Running sudo unattended-upgrade will install all the security package available for upgrade. Install this package if it isn't already installed using sudo apt-get install ...


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According to the Ubuntu Security Notices, this affects 10.04 and 12.04 among the currently supported versions of Ubuntu. How can I protect myself? Upgrade. sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade Or, specifically: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install libc6 Check the currently installed version using apt-cache policy libc6: For 12.04, it should ...


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If your on a 64 bit system check out This Launchpad and you will find the .deb you need there. If x86 im sure we can find that too if needed. Edit: also a package search shows Trusty has 2.19-0Ubuntu6.4 and Utopic has 2.19-10Ubuntu2.1 Edit2: This Launchpad has the needed libc-bin


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If you're on 12.04 or 10.04, you don't need to do anything special to upgrade. The usual procedure applies: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade Or, specifically: sudo apt-get install libc6 To verify, run apt-cache policy: $ apt-cache policy libc6 libc6: Installed: 2.15-0ubuntu10.10 Candidate: 2.15-0ubuntu10.10 Version table: *** ...


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The only way to otherwise guarantee a secure wipe on an SSD is to destroy it. While this is generally true, the latest generation of SSD have Trusted Computing Group 'Opal 2.0' transparent AES-256 encryption of pages (storage elements), and discard this key when the page is no longer needed or has exceeded 'wear' (re-write) tolerance. See: Samsung > ...


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I'd suggest reading this Security.SE answer (and the links at the end). It is true that overwriting a memory sector will wipe it without any of the ghosting old mechanical disks get, but the controllers for these disks have all sorts of life-prolonging features that obscure physical "sectors" away from the operating system. For example, many modern disks ...


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Yes, it would absolutely be possible for someone to remotely access your computer with your user name and password. There are many ways to do this (ssh, vnc, etc). The good news is that these backdoors are disabled by default, but if you have opened one of these backdoors in the past for your own use (I know I have), in many cases your username and password ...


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Should someone get your password, they would not able to do either of those, unless you install an SSH server on your computer, which (I think) does not come by default.


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Unless you have some remote access system installed like SSH or a Remote Desktop program, it is not possible without having physical access to the machine. However in the unlikely chance that there is such a large bug in Ubuntu that allows someone to do just that- I think we'd all need to take a step back.


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Well, the long answer may be "yes, but be aware of losing compatibility to 16 byte encoded directories". Applying the following patch against the recent ecryptfs-utils-104 sources should do the job - however, it simply changes the hardcoded value to 32 without the possibility to choose. But if it's useful to someone: diff -ruN ecryptfs-utils-104/README ...


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My solution is based on watching /dev/video* using inotifywait. Start by installing inotify-tools: sudo apt-get install inotify-tools Then insert the following line into the file /etc/rc.local, before the line with exit 0: /usr/bin/inotifywait --timefmt "%F %T" --format "%T %w %e" --daemon --outfile /var/log/camera.log /dev/video* Reboot. The accesses ...


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Have you tried using TrueCrypt? It worked for me. Also this post may be of interest to you: Password protect files/folders using cli


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There are actually almost as many Linux viruses as Windows ones. The reasons why Linux is possibly less prone to viruses are: 1. Programs are run as normal user, not Root User 2. More eyeballs on the code, nowhere for malware to hide 3. Vast diversity makes it difficult to reproduce flaws in a system 4. All software and drivers are frequently updated by ...


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Am 100% safe from malware? If the question is "Am I 100% safe from malware?" Then the question would be marked as "too broad" and flagged for deletion. Are MP3 files safe? If the question is "Can I safely open a MP3 file downloaded from a shady source with VLC or Rhythombox". Then the answer is: Yes, if you have the installed the latest updates. ...


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This question interests me, and I'm trying to get another four reputation points, so I can upvote a useful answer I recently found here on ask Ubuntu... so I tried to find the answer: The ones who maintain "Universe" are the Masters of the Universe. On their mailing list there was a discussion on security updates for Drupal, in August 2014. One answer worth ...


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Please use the GPG web-of-trust to verify key validity after importing the key.


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sudo adduser username sudo adduser username www-data First command creates user and will create a home directory for user and add them to group (whatever username is), second gives group access to www-data to said user. If user already exists, just use the second command. If user is logged in at time they will need to log out and in again for change ...


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The isc-dhcp-client and isc-dhcp-server packages (DHCP client and server) re-runs their daemons regularly and cause a "packet sniffer" false positive. The chkrootkit package's /etc/cron.daily/chkrootkit script has a workaround for this which tries to replaces the PID with a static string. However, the workaround for the false positive doesn't work. This ...


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To enable the changes made in sysctl.conf you will need to run the command: sudo sysctl -p /etc/sysctl.conf Reference How to Enable IP Forwarding in Linux


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My answer would be yes. @michael.bourke has the facts quite right, but I disagree with the security implications. For all practical purposes you can see the host and the client machine as two separate machines, so there is no direct issue on that side. There is not much difference between having 2 physical machines and this VM setup in security. But if ...


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to clarifiy you have a physical machine running ubuntu , with virtual box running windows server that runs iis , you have set up port forwarding to the vm so you can run iis to the world , and you are asking if someone from the world finds a security flaw will it effect the ubuntu physical machine simple answer is no the vm and virtual machine drive it ...



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