Hot answers tagged

40

It has been patched already. Quoting the article: [...] "Yevgeny Pats discovered that the session keyring implementation in the Linux kernel did not properly reference count when joining an existing session keyring. A local attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash) or possibly execute arbitrary code with administrative ...


26

You can use the open-source Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) created by Google, known as the Google Authenticator. This module is available in the standard repositories, as well as from GitHub so that you can build from source. Coupled with the Android, iOS, or Blackberry App of the same name, it creates time-based, time-sensitive codes for ...


16

Just complementing @kos's nice answer: The Zero day exploit (CVE-2016-0728) was found by the researchers at Perception Point. It was introduced in 3.8 Vanilla Kernel. So the Ubuntu releases using kernel versions 3.8 or later are vulnerable. As @kos already mentioned, on a supported release you can just upgrade the kernel to install the patch: sudo apt-get ...


14

Well, better be concise: Yes No, there will be no updates. You will be able to install obsolete software from the EOL repositories, but nothing there will be updated and you will not receive help from this or other official help websites. Also, when the distro version becomes EOL you will have to follow a particular procedure to upgrade it to the ...


7

mate! Hope this helps you: Yes, it means there will be no official support from canonical for 15.10. That is the reason why LTS is always recommended for people who need stability. You can still keep using 15.10 normally, tough. Yes, you can patch and update your system from other sources and/or repositories, but I wouldn't recommend it. You can even ...


6

It makes the password length harder to know. If your screen is being monitored, for example, using • placeholders would allow an attacker to dramatically reduce the number of passwords they'd need to try in order to crack your password. Good passwords are made up of a bank of about 40 characters. So compare the difference between If you have a 10 char ...


5

Just a minor addition to two great answers: the most annoying thing for me about using an unsupported version is that a few months after the support window ends, apt-get stops working. The main apt repositories delete references to your version. Of course you can find archives and add them to your sources list and it starts working again, so this isn't a ...


3

When a process calls free() it does not return the memory immediately back to system, instead it returns it back to the heap owned by that process. The heap either uses anonymous memory mapping for large chunks or sbrk() to shrink or grow the heap. Memory from the heap is returned back to the system when it is unmap'd or the heap shrinks with sbrk(). At ...


3

Accessing logs One with root privileges can make use of the command lastb to see all failed login attempts in the computer, also a much more detailed log file that records failed login attempts in the time span of a week can be found at /var/log/auth.log (no root privileges necessary) and the bad login attempts will be listed like this: MONTH DAY HH:MM:SS ...


3

Nope. fakeroot never has "real" root privileges. It is used for example while creating a debian installer. It is then to virtually install an application into the debian installer, not into your "real" system. A debian installer is actually nothing else but a scaled model of your system, with all the files, docs, manpages, possible libraries and ...


2

There is no need to show a * when inputting characters. Showing a * gives a hint to anyone watching you type: they then know the amount of characters you typed. And since is it better to type a wrong password than to have 1 person get to know something about your password (even if it is just the length) not showing a * is the better method. In case of ...


2

The description for that PPA clearly states: Mozilla Security/Stability testing archive for Ubuntu. So: No, don't install that! I would: Install NoScript (I did this years ago and never looked back) Disable JS everywhere, except on secure, trustworthy sites Turn off the sound and notifications in NoScript: it becomes much less annoying after ...


2

You do not need any of them even if you are not experienced. The bigger problem is exploits (bugs that are used to gain access) in the browser. There have been a few (not that many), "flash" has had far more bugs that could be exploited. The 2nd one does nothing related to security. "scriptblock" I can see this help you be more secure. But "web of ...


2

Looking at Andre Herman Bezerra's answer, the only problem with this is pointed out in the comments this DOES NOT restrict the user to update only (they can install/remove packages). If you want to restrict a user to be able to update only you're better off doing the following. Create a group or use the %staff group. In this example, i'm choosing to use ...


2

look here. That should do the trick lsmod | grep usb to list all usb modules being loaded right now and then unload these modules with sudo rmmod usb_whatever look here here. But keep in mind, that if you disable that, it could lead to problems if the X-Server is not starting. I think that is not needed because the guest has no right to see other files ...


2

SELinux is a security extension focused on restricting access to files based on the program being run rather than the user running it. For example, your web browser does not need access to every file that your account has access to, so SELinux can be configured to ony give it access to the files it needs, so that even if you go to a bad web site that takes ...


2

Firefox gets updates from Ubuntu official repositories. If you have a supported version of Ubuntu, you should have the latest version of Firefox with security updates. If this is not the case, then you have an EOL version of Ubuntu, or you did something wrong that prevents regular updates. You can install the latest Firefox version by running in terminal: ...


1

The current version of Firefox is 44.0, released on January 26. The current version of Firefox on Ubuntu on any supported release is 44.0, and it's only been a day. I don't know what more you could ask for in the name of updates.


1

My reasoning behind this is following: number of "•" characters you enter is very big hint for someone that would like to know/break your password. If the bad guy don't see nothing, your password is more secure. Possibly there are other reasons but one above is enough for me.


1

the simplest answer is this question : why to show the password ? if someone knows how many character your password has , he can make a dictionary with all possible combination of characters and numbers with the same length of your password. it would be cracked later.


1

I have a fresh installation of Ubuntu 15.10 and it appeared as soon as I started browsing the web. I only went to certain websites so far. I took a look inside the file and it does appear to be a collection of various programs on my computer. I changed permissions to /usr/share/mime/mime.cache to 400. I also emptied the file as root using: echo " " > ...


1

The linux-generic package is not installed for some reason. That's why you do not get kernel updates. You can install it by running: sudo apt-get install linux-generic


1

OK I found how to do it! WARNING: Doing this will hide the GUI input for the passphrase at the startup splash screen and also the messages "please enter passphrase...", etc. sudo nano /lib/plymouth/themes/ubuntu-logo/ubuntu-logo.script go around line 614 find this lines and comment them Plymouth.SetDisplayPasswordFunction (display_password_callback); ...


1

This is probably overkill, but ConfigServer Firewall (CSF) and LFD can help to monitor and protect your machines. Sending notifications about failed login attempts is just one of its many features. This should work out of the box, delivering notification email to root. In order to receive mail on a different machine, you'll need a program that can send ...


1

Your question is built upon the false premise that there are such things as "safe" and "unsafe" practices. There aren't. There are only relative measures of safety -- practice A may be more safe than practice B, but calling practice A "safe" is misleading at best. With that in mind, Secure Boot, as the name implies, was designed to increase safety. We could ...


1

A miniscule amount of research (locate ntp | grep /etc) led me to /etc/init.d/ntp which starts ntp, and is linked to by the startup scripts in the /etc/rc?.d directories (on my Ubuntu Linux 14.04.3 LTS system, YMMV): /etc/rc1.d/K77ntp -> ../init.d/ntp /etc/rc2.d/S23ntp -> ../init.d/ntp /etc/rc3.d/S23ntp -> ../init.d/ntp /etc/rc4.d/S23ntp -> ...



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