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52

The risk of a typo is more than the risk of a bug. The risk of gaining a habit of "it doesn't work, stick sudo on it!" is much higher than the risk of a bug. As a sysadmin who's seen people execute all sorts of random commands with sudo that didn't need them, I always caution against superfluous usage of sudo. While cat isn't harmful, the habit that this ...


9

If the block is meant to block not-so-experienced users from using certain applications, editing (a local copy of) the application's desktop file (as described in [1]) is probably the fastest and easiest way. Some additional things can be done to create an extra barrier and/or to prevent the fact that the user finds out too easily what we've done to block ...


8

Yes, in general root permission are required to install a rootkit. Many of the rootkits contain a module that is loaded into the kernel, other just overwrite tool typically used by root. In a properly set and perfect system there would be no way to install the root kit without root privileges, but... ...there might be problems with the system configuration ...


8

If it was me I would persue the following method: Get a user to download and install a piece of software (#1). Have that software install the intended software. Hide a binairy blob inside that application lets you download software (ie. a tool you can use to ftp, wget etc). Prompt for the admin account (#2) and use that to use an ftp, wget instance to ...


7

Using sudo excessively is the Linux equivalent of the old Windows habit of running everything under the Administrator account. That one has been discussed and criticized to hell and back, so you can read everything that talks about why a person should not be running their Windows computer as an Administrator, and every single point will apply to habitual use ...


7

I think there is another issue not yet mentioned: sudo status is cached for the shell with a default of 15 minutes. This means you don't have to provide your password in the next 15 minutes in order to execute a potentially dangerous command. I think we all can think of more or less likely security issues that could result from that: Unknown software bugs ...


3

well, it's just cause you might accidentally mess with sensitive parts of your file system, causing much much trouble to yourself Being careful is never enough, so better not to expose yourself to unnecessary dangers


2

You can use the following commands from a terminal: swapon -s displays swap devices and sizes cat /proc/meminfo displays the total swap, and the free swap space cat /proc/swaps displays which swap devices are in use


2

So, my question is if there's any problem by removing this program (I never use remote desktop), No. And also, does removing them improve my security? No. Ubuntu is shipped as secure as possible. If Remmina would be a security problem by just being installed it would have been removed from our installation. And any Linux system for that matter. ...


1

ubuntu.excellmedia.net is a mirror. In this case for India. Mirrors are mainly there to speed up downloading: downloading from a site closer to you is faster than from a site in the UK. It also lowers stress on other servers holding the Ubuntu system. And you then also download a version with the native language incorporated and other default settings for ...


1

Once the system has booted use the command: swapon --show This will display which partitions have swap enabled. If you want to find the UUID of a partition of swap type: sudo blkid | grep swap


1

It is because cron daemon's activity goes to system logs. It is not annoying in my opinion, rather life saving if - let's say - you have to know if crontab is executed or not. Beside that you can control the output by editing the /etc/rsyslog.d/50-default.conf file to this: *.*;auth,authpriv.none,mail.none,cron.none -/var/log/syslog The relevant part ...


1

Linux (the Kernel) is mainly an abstraction layer for different kinds of hardware. It's a common ground where other software can built on top, not caring whether it runs on your smart phone or on your notebook. The people making that piece of software are very concerned to never ever ever break compatibility with existing software. The ABI is the bridge ...


1

A program runs in a especially allocated space in memory. A segfault, stack overflow, etc. happens inside this space. When you run your programs normally, these errors won't affect anything else. All these errors happen on the RAM btw., not on persistent memory. So you won't compromise your computer with stuff like this. (Unless you're doing some buggy ...


1

The location where config files for Apache are stored in Ubuntu by default, is already only writeable by the root user. The files however, must be readable by non-root, as the httpd daemon does not run as root.



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