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-1

A good tool for the job is grep. With grep -i -n 'string' you can search for a particular string and find out what line it is on. Suppose java compiler reports me an error that in line System.out.println("Hello World") I have no semicolon or something like that. What I could do is to cat helloworld.java | grep -i -n 'hello world' And this would return ...


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Hey everyone I think many of us completely over-thought this. As I continued reading through your comments and Answers, I realized that the basic text editor tells you what line and Column you are on if you look at the bottom of the window. :/ I feel silly lol


4

In vi or vim :set nu turns on line numbers :set nonu turns off line numbers 52gg goes to line 52 52G also goes to line 52


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If you're looking for a GUI approach, you can display line numbers in the default text editor, gedit. To do this, go to Edit -> Preferences and tick the box that says "Display line numbers." You can also jump to a specific line number by using Ctrl+I.


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You can display the file with less. Use less -N to display line numbers, type "52" to less to get to line 52. See man less. Or, you could open the file with the vim editor (type vim thefile), then typing ":52" will get you to line 52. See man vim


5

Let's create a test file; $ seq 100 >file Now, let's display line 52: $ sed -n 52p file 52 Or: $ awk 'NR==52' file 52 Or, if you have the file open in vim, you can type 52G to jump to line 52. Using nano Suppose that your file is called file.txt. To edit the file in nano with line, column, and character count displayed, run nano -c file.txt ...


3

Open Nautilus, the default file manager, by searching the dash for Files or clicking Files in the Launcher. Press Ctrl+F Type your search. You can chose whether to search in the Current folder or All Files. For just txt files, type txt. Not the wildcard (although it may work, I don't think it does).


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Here are a few tips gathered from other similar questions on this site: install preload (1): it seems to help, at least in my case, but some users noticed a higher RAM usage disable a few scopes you don't need from the "Applications" scope in your dash clear your Zeitgeist cache: I think this can be done from System Settings > Privacy > Files & ...


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It is an option open VIM and run :set hlsearch To turn it off :set nohlsearch See http://vim.wikia.com/wiki/Highlight_all_search_pattern_matches for details


1

Before changing defaults system-wide, you should thoroughly test something like a new file manager in one of your users first by adding nemo as the default file manager in the start-up applications... One user: Go to the dash, then type startup applications and add: by using nemo -n in the command. Then disable Nautilus from drawing the desktop icons by ...


0

Goto System Settings -> Keyboard -> Shortcuts -> Launchers. Now select 'Search' and hit the 'Backspace' button on the keyboard. Make sure the shortcut is now 'Disabled'. Now 'Ctrl+F' will work as usual.


2

you can use GREP, I think this is the most simple solution, probably also add some other grep parameters to make the match more accurate tree | grep ABC


1

Personally I use terminal commands dpkg --get-selections | less or dpkg --get-selections | grep packagename


0

In the terminal you can see a list of all installed packages like this: dpkg -l Or, for example, write listing to a file: dpkg -l > packages.txt


1

You don't need to modify the defaults to make LO Calc search in values, too. The option Value means "only values"; Formulas means "values and formulas". You might restrict the search to values implicitly by enabling case-sensitive search: Formulas are always formatted uppercase, even if entered lower-case. So, if the text you're searching isn't uppercase, ...


0

How about this: $history | less then use "/" to search for things, just like you would in vim. if you wanted to get really special you could make an alias for that, or even a little script, and bind a keystroke to it. press "q" to escape. How to alias that: $alias b='history | less' so now you want to bind this to a key: you could use bind. This ...



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