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To search into a Xournal file, you can change its suffix from xoj to gz, then gunzip it. This produces a text (xml) file, that you can search.


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I don't have gnome-search-tool, but every *nix system has command line, and there are already tools there for finding files with particular strings inside them or in the names. So open the gnome-terminal with Ctrl + Alt + T and lets get started. Best suggestion is probably try to remember where you've placed the file in the first place? what directory ? I ...


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If you use gnome-search-tool to look for .txt or .rtf files containing any Unicode characters (including Cyrillic ), this just works. However your example of .doc files is a bad one as these are binary files coming from a program that uses compression to store the text that you see on the screen in a proprietary format on disk, so there the ...


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&t= Through partnerships with developers and companies, DuckDuckGo has been integrated into many applications. In these partnerships, a portion of DuckDuckGo's advertising revenue is sometimes shared back. To assign advertising revenue and collect anonymous aggregate usage information, developers add a unique "&t=" parameter to ...


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Read the output from apt-cache show xul-ext-ubufox. Here's a partial quote: Package: xul-ext-ubufox Priority: optional Section: web Installed-Size: 378 Maintainer: Ubuntu Mozilla Team <ubuntu-mozillateam@lists.ubuntu.com> Architecture: all Source: ubufox Version: 2.8-0ubuntu1 Replaces: ubufox (<< 0.9~rc2-0ubuntu3) Provides: firefox-ubufox, ...


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You can create a custom shell script and then use the "export" command to save your custom path. so something like /home/Blub/shellscripts/ and in that folder put your cmd.sh file...You can even make it executable and also you don't need the file extension .sh. export PATH=/path/to/dir:$PATH Optionally you can also go to your home folder and type ctrl+h ...


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OK, now that you have only one language and locality defined in your user profile, you can already see that en_GB has a different collating sequence then en_US. If you're familiar with database technology, what we'll be accomplishing is something like: SELECT Name FROM tPerson WHERE Name LIKE "helen%" Name ---- Helen Hélène Helena ... I propose the ...


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Options are application specific Just like in Windows, filtering options are application specific. Checking my Windows(7) VM, I actually could not find applications that supported filtering, using wildcards in their dialogue windows, apart from the one you mention. Similar (wildcard-) functionality to what you describe is possible with e.g. Gedit: In the ...


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Notepad++ is a derivative of Scintilla (SciTE) you can try it :) Try Scintilla and SciTE http://scintilla.sourceforge.net/


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This answer proposes a solution, by setting the dconf property dconf>org>gnome>desktop>interface>can-change-accels to true, hovering over the menu item, and typing a new shortcut. But it doesn't work for everyone, myself included.


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Due to the way that find evaluates logical tests, you likely need to group the -name tests using [escaped] parentheses to get the desired behavior: find /etc \( -name "*.txt" -o -name "*.log" \) -type f -mtime +7 -exec echo {} \; I'm assuming you're using echo as a placeholder for some other -exec action that you wish to perform, otherwise you could ...


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XFE has root window and search capability. You can find it in the software center or Synaptic or simply type sudo apt-get install xfe.


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I would also recommend SpaceFM. It is lightweight and has a search function. (sudo apt-get install spacefm) You can use it as an alternative manager both in Xubuntu or Lubuntu. As for the search program for Lubuntu try Gnome-Do. (sudo apt-get install gnome-do)


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Use the Nemo file manager under Xubuntu. Just set it as the default file manager, but don't delete the default Xubuntu File Manager. Just have it as an additional (and default) file manager.


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To Search 'qawas' String inside the jar find . -iname '*.jar' -printf "unzip -c %p | grep -q 'qawas' && echo %p\n" | sh or alternatively use below to find which class use find . -iname '*.jar' -print | while read jar; do echo "$jar:" unzip -qq -l $jar | sed 's/.* //' | while read cls; do unzip -c $jar $cls | grep -q 'Tag read' && ...



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