New answers tagged

0

Yes, a binary search will generally be faster. No, the standard library index function has no option for that. Another answer has code for a binary search: from bisect import bisect_left def binary_search(a, x, lo=0, hi=None): # can't use a to specify default for hi hi = hi if hi is not None else len(a) # hi defaults to len(a) pos = ...


14

which finds the binary executable of the program (if it is in your PATH). man which explains more clearly: which returns the pathnames of the files (or links) which would be executed in the current environment, had its arguments been given as commands in a strictly POSIX-conformant shell. It does this by searching the PATH for executable ...


0

In perl, option 0 can be use to process the file as single record. This way try: perl -n0E 'say $ARGV if /foo\s*$/' file* \s* is useful to cope with new lines and similar, normally present at the end of the file. Another similar alternative (gnugrep) grep -lzP 'foo\Z' file*


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I also recommend FSearch https://github.com/cboxdoerfer/fsearch I found that it index my files faster than ANGRYsearch. However searching for files feels smooth with ANGRYsearch. Recrawling is faster with ANGRYsearch. So overall ANGRYsearch feels better. FSearch is just in PreAlpha according to git page. So future release may improve it. Compiling was ...


0

I would use gnome-do myself. It occasionally froze for me the first time I would use it upon rebooting, but this can be mostly solved by changing its settings to get rid of the shadow and transparency effects. What's more you can change the appearance style (I prefer mini myself) and the colour of the widow to suit your preferences. Also it can if desired ...


1

I am going for the desktop search feature of the kde plasma. I guess the following is possible ... balooctl config set contentIndexing no


0

You can search for text in nano using Ctrl W. Alt W (or Esc, W) will repeat the find. (Alternatively, leaving the box blank will default to the last text searched for.) Pressing Ctrl R while in the Find prompt will activate Replace mode. (Sadly, Ctrl W does't seem to work while in nano's Ctrl G help screen..)


2

My first recommendation is ANGRYsearch. Superfast, fully configurable. You can find the official website here. To install, you need some dependencies (if not there already). In a terminal type: sudo apt install python3-pyqt5 Then, download latest release from here. Unzip in a folder, and then from a terminal inside that folder type: chmod +x install.sh ...


-1

Why do you need Wine? Is it not what you search (on Linux system)? apropos - search the manual page names and descriptions man apropos locate - find files by name man locate locate "fir." find - search for files in a directory hierarchy man find find / |grep "fir." grep, egrep, fgrep, rgrep - print lines matching a pattern grep -R "fir." /home/...


0

I compared three of the suggestions in here with 64 bit 16.04 Kubuntu: Searchmonkey works with 64-bit Ubuntu nowadays. It is similar to regexxer. It appeared fast, but naturally it is much slower than index based search. Search for Files and Alt-F2 don't work with the KDE Ubuntu version. My recommendation is Recoll and I have added some installation ...


0

From looking at the Browser > Settings > Search Engine screen, I too cannot see a way to add one that is not in the list. It looks like you can only select the pre-defined list. I would raise this in Launchpad if I was you, to get it addressed. However, for now you could add the required search engine as a favourite or even as your home screen, until a more ...


-1

How to you use wildcards, especially the * (star) in Linux Ubuntu Nautilus GUI File Search? I also was just struggling with this issue, but I think I found an answer. Here are the equivalent Windows and Nautilus search patterns: Windows: diagram*.ppt Nautilus: diagram ppt Basically, try using a spacebar character in Nautilus where you would use a * ...


4

Nautilus search ... if tracker is available it will show the results from that. From the link: Tracker provides the following: Indexer for desktop search (for more details see this spec : https://wiki.ubuntu.com/IntegratedDesktopSearch) Tag database for doing keyword tagging of any object Extensible metadata database for apps like gedit ...



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