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You may try pressing Ctrl-Alt-F1 on your keyboard and should see a terminal login window. Enter a normal user and password to login After that try to become user root via sudo bash and entering the password again (the user must be allowed as an administrative user) If everything is working, you are on shell with just the "#"-sign - that means you are root ...


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You can get this in-distro now which is the better way to support it over time. sudo apt-get install fglrx fglrx-amdcccle fglrx-core


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I found a generic fix that worked perfectly jut follows the instructions here: http://itsfoss.com/fix-brightness-ubuntu-1310/


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If you have issues with video adapter after fresh install, you need to boot with "nomodeset" boot parameter and after that install a proper video driver. In some cases video adapters are not well supported by kernel drivers. How to boot with "nomodeset" you can see HERE.


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I just solved the problem and don't want to delete the question because I think this could be interesting for other people as well. I simply changed GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="quiet splash acpi_osi=Linux acpi_backlight=vendor" in /etc/default/grub, ran sudo update-grub rebooted and the problem was resolved. :)


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Open display settings and if there is another screen disable it.


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What worked for me was going to control panel, then power options. Then you see plans shown on battery meter and show/hide additional plans. for all the plans change the settings to whichever brightness you always want it to be. Please reply if you have any questions.


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This page taught me how to map my generic tablet input to just one of my monitors (I have two, stacked vertically). The middle section describes messing around with the coordinate transformation matrix. To map my tablet to my top monitor I had to run the command: xinput set-prop "HUION KentingK58" --type=float "Coordinate Transformation Matrix" 1 0 0 0 ...


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Because you are trying to disable the splash screen, use the standard command line text editor for Ubuntu: sudo nano /etc/default/grub Make your changes and update the Grub config sudo update-grub


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I think this is what you're asking: You need to run screen -dmS (somenamegoeshere) -X (pathtoscript) and replace (somenamegoeshere) with a unique name to identify it and (pathtoscript) with the path to your script.


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Whatever happened, I'm pretty sure it's unrelated to the installed Linux system. Missing drivers in Windows certainly are, the other thing I'm not quite sure about. To analyse this problem, please use the Windows setup DVD to repair boot problems. This will make Xubuntu unbootable, but you can fix that later. Just make sure you have an Ubuntu live USB or ...


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Being that you installed via DVD I can only help but wonder, was your original OS Windows 8+? If so you may just be encountering the common boot loader error. Try this: Restart your computer Press F2 (or whatever F key your manufactured designated) to load up the BIOS setup Navigate to the 'Security' Section and change 'Secure Boot' to Disabled Navigate ...


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You can add display-setup-script=<your_xrandr_command> to /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf in [seat defaults] section. This way it will start before you login into the system. It also can be done in xorg.conf file, or better in a new file in /use/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/<50-some_name.conf>


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Personally, I'd add your command xrandr --addmode DVI-0 1600x900 to list of Startup Applications, or create a .desktop file in ~/.config/autostart , so that the command runs on every login.


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light-locker lies liberally. Even with it set to disabled, even with it explicitly telling me that locking was being handled by Xfce Power Manager, it still jumped in and locked the screen after resume from suspend. Solution: sudo apt-get -y remove light-locker And get on with your life.



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