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cupsaddsmb is the missing link here. There's a (rather old, 2004) how-to in the Samba manual that covers the exact steps, but there are more recent ones if you search around (like this one from 2010). Simplified: add a print$ share in smb.conf if it doesn't already exist move the Windows drivers into /usr/share/cups/drv run cupsaddsmb -H localhost -U ...


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The sec=ntlm doesn't solve the problem on my desktop (Ubuntu 13.10). It seems the parameter format changed a bit about the domain. Used to work this before but does not now: -o username=msdomain/msusername,password=mspassword I've changed to this format: -o dom=msdomain,username=msusername,password=mspassword and it works well now.


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My answer doesn't directly relate to the error but to how to get sharing working. I had run up against the error BTW during this and so it does fix it in the end. Just not clearly so... For Ubuntu 14.04 samba server and Ubuntu client it is possible to get it working. The method I wanted doesn't need a login... My notes on this are a bit of a mess because ...


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If you have installed nautilus then Open Nautilus, go to "File"->"Connect to Server". By giving proper arguments you can mount it in your filesystem


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In each of the 12 computers: Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: sudo -i apt-get update apt-get install --reinstall samba samba-common samba-common-bin smbclient samba-vfs-modules samba-dsdb-modules libsmbclient python-samba samba-libs libwbclient0 smbpasswd -a user_pc01 smbpasswd -a user_pc02 smbpasswd -a user_pc03 smbpasswd -a user_pc04 smbpasswd ...


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As far as I understand, the CIFS share is shared on a Windows machine and mounted on Ubuntu... If my assumption is correct, just define UID "root" with the same PWD on the Windows machine. If not, leave a note @Fabby and I'll delete my answer...


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Try this mount –t cifs //servername/sharename /mountpoint –o username=userid It will ask for the password, once you enter this command. Also make sure that you have cifs share entry in /etc/fstab


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You want to change the users' umask There is an answer describing it here. TL;DR $ umask 007 for each user.


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Building on Diego's answer, I have integrated this into a wine wrapper which can be used for classic Wine installations. I've only targeted the specific instance where wine is run as "wine start" where the path is the 4th argument, but this could be expanded to iterate through all arguments testing for pathnames. Also for me, the folder in /run/user was my ...


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By filling in the name or IP address of the Windows machine? ;-)


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[Ubuntu] Path = /home Available = yes Valid users = ubuntu Read only = no Browsable = yes Public = yes Writable = yes


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Go to a terminal using Ctrl+Alt+T Type the following command: route This should give you something like: Kernel IP routing table Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use Iface default 192.168.1.1 0.0.0.0 UG 0 0 0 wlan0 192.168.1.0 * 255.255.255.0 U 9 0 ...


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I think that I managed to disable SMB1 protocol with these two lines in the [global] section: min protocol = LANMAN2 max protocol = SMB3 I'm still not completely sure about the order of protocols in Samba, but I'm quite confident that LANMAN2 is after SMB1.


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Figured out that sudo apparmor_parser --replace /etc/apparmor.d/usr.sbin.named was necessary to reload the changes I'd made to the apparmor profile


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The problem was that A had no Samba users configured whereas B did. Thus the user of A was known to B and automatically accepted but the B user was unknown to A. In fact, A had no known users (maybe, because it was a new install of 14.04, whereas B was an upgrade) so A neither showed it's shared resources nor allowed access. Users are not configured in ...


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smb.conf is a red herring ; this sets up Samba on your local box - ie, serving shared folders up, not accessing them. Try from a terminal sudo mount -t cifs \ -o user=windowsuser,domain=windowsdomain,uid=ubuntuusername \ //windowsmachine/sharedfolder /mnt Which should prompt you for your sudo password, then your Windows one. The ...


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sudo apt-get remove --purge package_name



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