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:facepalm: dumb guy making progress: UUID="ID From blkid" /mnt/disk1 ext4 rw,user,auto 0 0 entered into /etc/fstab "user" need to be username, in my case "md" folder access restored, but still getting a message on boot that there is a problem mounting /mnt/rdisk Edit : putting in my username helped access but webmin shows raid active but not mounted. ...


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Are you use real server or just install samba package in your desktop system ? In my machine i added the samba configuration with this simple script : [ISO_Linux] path = /home/teluk/iso guest ok = yes read only = no browseable = yes Make sure your directory permissions is set to accessible for everyone but don't set writable ...


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Not sure if you're using the default smb.conf that's configured for ease of setting up or not. I'd recommend doing that first for debugging. You need to run sudo smbpasswd -a <user> for each user that needs to login as well (I usually have to anyway). There should be a default smb.conf at /usr/share/samba/smb.conf


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For directories in Ubuntu you need to have the 'x' labeled in the permissions for directories. even if you own the directory you can still keep yourself out if you forget to add the 'x' for owner. IE chmod 766 would lock you out of the folder if you were not the owner. or chmod +xwr /folder. Another example would be dxwrxwrx-r, would give group and owner ...


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EVERYONE applies to your network only. But for security reasons, I'd recommend keeping things you consider confidential in a safer area.


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Everyone means everyone that is able to visit your system from walking up to the machine to anyone outside on the internet visiting a website you host, or ssh tunnel you set up to your system. Or abuse a backdoor in your router (Netgear, NMX300 1.5.0.11 as an example). The way to revoke it is by executing the same command with less privileges. In general ...


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phillip@homeserver:~$ ls -lsblk /dev/sdb1 0 brw-rw---- 1 root disk 8, 17 Feb 6 20:04 /dev/sdb1 Do mean I should do the following: sudo chmod 711 /dev/sdb1 ?? I forgot to add that at first this PC only had 1GB of RAM. I upgraded to 2GB and have another 2GB on order. It is an old system (ASUS P4P800 mobo)


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The CUPS errors are not an issue. I get those also with my setup and I have no trouble accessing samba shares. Is your firewall turned on and if so, is samba being blocked? Is the dylanweber user also a regular login id on your system? Have you tried using your regular login password (if different from what you set for samba)? If you try to access the ...


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Check the permissions where your /dev/sdb1 is mounted. to check where the /dev/sdb1 is mounted. ~lsblk modify permissions ~chmod 711 /mount point maybe even change ownership of the directory you're sharing ~chown user:user /mount point


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If you have configured /etc/samba/smb.conf for shared folders then you must assign group or user to this share. e.g if you have share: [share] comment = Ubuntu File Server Share path = /srv/samba/share browsable = yes guest ok = yes read only = no create mask = 0755 Then you can give access to this share to other users multiple ...


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I resolved this using the following: Terminal: sudo gedit /etc/fstab Then adding the following: //192.168.0.2/Music /home/pst007x/Music/ServerMusic cifs _netdev,comment=systemd.automount,auto,owner,credentials=/home/pst007x/.smbcredential,uid=1000,gid=1000,iocharset=utf8,sec=ntlm 0 0


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On arch you can get your IP with ip addr You will need to add the directories you want to share in the /etc/samba/smb.conf directory. I'm not sure how you're planing on sharing your drives with guest or user auth. But the samba wiki might be a good place to start. wiki samba


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You can try Samba. Please look at: what is samba and how to use it


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Try this: Place the DNS servers in /etc/network/interfaces, not in /etc/resolv.conf Add this line at the bottom of your static configurations dns-nameservers 208.67.222.222 208.67.220.220 #OpenDNS' servers as example Then run these commands in the terminal to restart the interface. sudo su ifdown eth0 && ifup eth0 Hope this works!


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This turned out to be a bug introduced in Samba 4.1+ https://www.turnkeylinux.org/forum/support/20160104/samba-updated-and-broke-root-share-any-ideas There are two workarounds for this: A) Enable symlinks. Add this to your smb.conf [global] wide links = yes unix extensions = no B) https://bugzilla.samba.org/show_bug.cgi?id=11647#c7 mkdir ...


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All the manuals say that under the share options you may have read only = yes. It turned out to me, that write possibility is required (a samba bug?). That's what jpetersen put as write list=@adm root <username>. When I have no write access, zero sized files appear under /var/spool/samba. When I map the shares as root - I succeed. Finally I made it ...


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So, I have fixed it. I deleted my messed up smb.conf file and started fresh. To follow the step by step guide go to Ubuntu Forums. Stormbringer has an amazing easy to follow guide for noobs. You can also find the default smb.conf file there.


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I think this is what you are after :) sudo apt-get remove --purge samba Hope this helps.


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Use the mount.cifs command instead, as it allows to specify a credentials file or prompts for a password if none given. Installation First of all, check you have the needed packages installed by issuing the following command: sudo apt-get install cifs-utils METHOD 1 - USING A CREDENTIALS FILE According to the manual ...


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Following this post: I want to share my "/" in samba. How to make it editable in windows networking? By default, your Samba users are not going to have write access to the filesystem root. The easiest way to do this is to force a user. (Samba users will access the share using the local user's privileges.) Make sure that the user you ...


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You'll have to setup an effective user and or effective group as part of you mount options. Make sure the user or group has the type of access you want to provide for for that share. You can also specify the type of file mask you want to be associated with the files and folders that user creates. This is an example to add to your options: ...


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Entering the following command worked for me: sudo chmod 777 /var/lib/samba/usershares


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Recursively: from bottom to top You probably need to do this recursively, which means you need to make sure the rename is done from bottom to top. If you would start at the highest level for example, all files and folders below, would literally be moved, and would need to be found again for example: /folder & co/some other folder/test & file.txt ...


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You could use find with -exec flag to call rename command for all the files found. find . -type f -name "*&*" -exec rename 's/&/AND/' {} + Here's a demo: DIR:/TESTDIR skolodya@ubuntu:$ ls DIR:/TESTDIR skolodya@ubuntu:$ touch "tom&jerry" "jekyl&hide" DIR:/TESTDIR skolodya@ubuntu:$ find . -type f -name "*&*" ...


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After hours of searching, I discovered that the share name and the share directory cannot be the same (and it's not case-sensitive, either). See this post on serverfault. So, if I change my share name in smb.conf from: [Music] to [Tunes] I can both read and write to the share. No other changes to my smb.conf were necessary, and no need to chmod ...


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Here is one solution that seems to work and is (relatively) straightforward and (largely) GUI-based: Install GRSYNC from the Ubuntu apps directory (or through apt-get install). Install "Scheduled Tasks" / Gnome-Schedule using CLI / terminal: sudo apt-get install gnome-schedule Mount your NAS / external hard drive so that Linux recognizes it as if it was ...


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I was able to setup a like configuration with my host, and when I went to access the share through the network browser of Windows 10, it prompted me for my username and password. It only opened up when I gave it the correct information. Looking at what you have compared to my setup, the following lines I have added to my [global] section of my ...


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hdparm -B255 /dev/sdX will help as this disables the spindown.


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You might want to make sure you have a user configured for Samba. Try smbpasswd -a [user] (needs to map to a unix user). Also try setting your log level higher and look in /var/log/samba/log.smbd for clues, it should also create a log.[clientname] as well, once a user can connect anyway. If you are still having an issue, try to connect to the share and post ...



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