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I have figured it out!!! Turns out I have set up ufw firewall to block any incoming traffic (in this case Samba) which is not listed in the before.rules in ufw config. I was following the OpenVPN guide and it asked me to set it up. A single command fixed my problem: sudo ufw allow Samba Anyway, thanks everyone for helping me along! I appreciated it!! ...


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One way to go about it would be to map the IP (and set it to static if it is not). This removes the need for login credentials. Example: [TV] path = /media/samba/TV available = yes hosts allow = 127.0.0.1 192.168. 10. hosts deny = 0.0.0.0/0 read only = no browseable = yes public = yes writable = yes This enables the ENTIRE 192.168.. network and the ...


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Personally I think it would be wise to install Linux Server and use Samba and Webmin. This is what I do to share files stored in one place. There are loads of tutorials out there that will help, trust me I started with minimal knowledge of Linux, but if not there should be many others who will give a more detailed and less-expansive answer.


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I found this question while researching the magic I performed recently to do exactly this for one of my users. My workflow differs remarkably to the other answers. Do note, however, this is about the most simple case possible. Assuming your username is ae and your home is /home/ae 1) Set up smbfs: mkdir /home/ae/.smb 1a) If windows login credentials are ...


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Mr. Evans, start here: https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/samba-ldap.html Both Samba and LDAP require solid beginnings. You really need to know what you want to achieve before going forward. They can be confusing topics.


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Yes, it is safe as long as you have a complex wifi password.The only way for people to get in is by gaining access to your wifi or router (wan). I recommend that you use a password though. If you want to ensure that nobody is on your network, run the arp -na command (you can also use nmap to scan the whole netmask).


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As long as you only use this on your private home network and you don't share the network with other people that you don't know/trust (such as in an apartment complex), then you should be fine. WPA2 can be breached through brute-force attacks but someone would have to be in range of your wifi connection in order to attempt to gain access, and if you're very ...


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navigate to the folder using terminal $ chmod -R 755 directory have a look on this https://help.ubuntu.com/community/FilePermissions https://mdshaonimran.wordpress.com/2010/06/13/chmod-change-filefolder-permission-in-ubuntu/


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you did use smbpassword to set the user password right? The user password and the samba password are different in linux To create initially sudo smbpasswd -a nameuser or if added remove -a to change passwOrd in /etc/samba/smb.conf set workgroup encrypt password to. True Passdb backend tdbsam Then define an entry at the end [Data] comment = data path = ...


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Try only to add interface name after 127.0.0.1 in your global config interfaces = 127.0.0.0/8 eth0


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I believe you need to basically just blank out the interfaces = 127.0.0.1 to interfaces =, which is the default value. Having interfaces = 127.0.0.1 means that the interfaces for samba is set to the loopback port which is not used anywhere on the network except for the systems themselves. More information can be found here. To find your IP address for ...


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While I am pretty sure that any filesystem can be mounted in a Linux operating system (including NTFS, FAT32, FAT16), Windows does not see Linux filesystems (e2fs, e3fs, reiserfs, etc). A possible solution could be to make a folder on the Windows system and save files to be shared to that folder while in the Linux system. This actually makes viewing ...


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This is from: https://www.samba.org/samba/docs/man/manpages-3/smb.conf.5.html#SECURITY security (G) This option affects how clients respond to Samba and is one of the most important settings in the smb.conf file. The default is security = user, as this is the most common setting, used for a standalone file server or a DC. The alternatives are security = ...


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This is from https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Samba_port_usage Identify on which ports and interfaces Samba is listening You can use "netstat" to identify which ports Samba and related daemons are listening on and on which IPs: netstat -tulpn | egrep "samba|smbd|nmbd|winbind" The following is a snippet of an example output: tcp 0 0 ...


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Permissions are fixed by adding the group to the smb.conf file valid users = @media_users


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Samba has a group by default to allow sharing. To add a user to that group just type sudo gpasswd -a david sambashare. Logout and log back in for the changes to take affect. When you map the network drive in Windows you will need to provide the credentials (linux ones) for david. Your samba configuration might need a little tweaking. Here's mine for example: ...


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I just had the same issue with a Windows 8.1 host (Asus TF100TA), when I tried to access a public share from my Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS host (kernel 3.13.0-53-generic - might be a bit outdated). Solution for me: Downgrade SMB version from 3.0 (Windows 8) to 2.0 (Vista). root@thor:/mnt# mount -t cifs -o guest,vers=2.0 \\192.168.1.115\cam /mnt/network ...


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Apparently, this thread had the answer I was looking for: https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=98704


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In Ubuntu 15.04, system-config-samba fails unless you launch it with superuser privileges (gksu system-config-samba). I was subsequently able to launch system-config-samba from the Unity dash once I had logged out and logged back in after I configured samba for the first time using gksu. I also got the following error message the first time: SystemError: ...


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It turns out that it depends how I connect to the server - through another address it works just fine to make ls in /run/user/{userid}/gvfs/... as proposed also in other posts


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Try this: Open Advanced sharing settings by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type network, click Network and Sharing Center, and then, in the left pane, click Change advanced sharing settings. Click the chevron Picture of the chevron icon to expand your current network profile. Under ...


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Not having the reputation to comment I'm answering instead. What is it you're trying to do? I've found PBIS the easiest way to get a Ubuntu box onto a Windows domain (2012 R2 in my case). When setting up a file server I then used the instructions here to setup the Samba shares.


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Just an update on my question I ended up ditching Windows server and going with a full Linux job - Ubuntu server and Edubuntu clients. Ultimately I feel this was the best decision but far from perfect. I have DHCP and DNS being provided by the server. A great feature of this setup is the ability to cache apt requests on the server so when an update occurs ...



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