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40

It depends. Most people use a router between their desktop and the internet and by default there are no sigificant open ports, so in the vast majority of user cases a firewall adds very litte, if anything. It can help if you inadvertantly install a server, such as VNC or SSH. A better question is what do you want to use a firewall for ? See: ...


10

It sounds like the question is about a host-based firewall on an Ubuntu PC. IF the machine never leaves the NAT-based network (ie, it is not a laptop that you take to coffee shops and use on free wifi networks), AND there are no ports open on your router that could be mapped to your Ubuntu machine, AND your router doesn't have any features which ...


9

Using a NAT, if you have no port forwarding to your machine, it is not accessible from the internet unless you explicitly open a connection to it (with vnc or teamviewer for example) so I think there is no problem not using a firewall on it. The unique worry could come from internal (LAN) access but usually not the case on home lan.


8

I have figured it out. Apparently I didn't have cifs-utils installed onto my server. Everything is working now. Install it by running the following command: sudo apt-get install cifs-utils


7

As of 10/23/2012 You need CIFS not SAMBA : sudo apt-get install cifs-utils Add //192.168.1.1/USB_Storage /media/public cifs guest 0 0 to your /etc/fstab I would not have gotten this far without the original answer so thank you.


6

From @Matv1 comment: I'm a bit confused. I was going on the assumption that Ubuntu wireless was working well, just that it was impacting throughput on your other connections. Now I understand that the connection on your ubuntu is dropped sometimes as well. What I notice in your dmesgis that the wifi client doesn't know which regulatory domain it ...


5

Do you know your router's IP address? (usually 192.168.1.1, but it may vary). Open a File Browser (Nautilus) window, then press Ctrl+L and in the location bar that appears type smb://192.168.1.1 that may give you access to the disk, which is usually published to the network via the SMB protocol.


5

Other answers have addressed your options while installing and the issue of Ubuntu accessing the Internet. The key points are that it's a good idea to test Ubuntu first on the live CD/DVD/USB (same as what you use to install from), and that your options are explained in various resources that explain how to install it, like this. I'd like to address the ...


5

By default VirtualBox works in "NAT" mode, meaning that it builds a "virtual" network and translates network accesses from the VM so that to the outside world, they appear to come from your actual computer. VirtualBox makes the VM think it's connected to a network, but in reality VirtualBox is providing network services, including a mini DHCP server. Then, ...


4

Run this in a terminal: sudo apt-get install hostapd Then, open a text editor program, for example gedit. Copy the following into it. interface=wlan0 driver=nl80211 ssid= channel=1 hw_mode=g auth_algs=1 wpa=3 wpa_passphrase= wpa_key_mgmt=WPA-PSK wpa_pairwise=TKIP CCMP rsn_pairwise=CCMP Don't forget to fill in the name of your network after ssid= as ...


4

Try this magic trick: Change your wireless channel to a number different from 13. Disable the automatic channel. There are regulations regarding the use of WLAN channels. Channels 12, 13 and 14 are not allowed in North America. For more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels#Interference_Concerns From your router configuration, I ...


3

Provided your router has enough storage (e.g. external USB HDD), it shouldn't be a problem if you're familiar with the command line. Your router is most probably running either an ARM or a MIPS processor. The appropriate debs can be found in the Debian repositories here. You can't install them directly on the router, so extract with dpkg-deb -x filename.deb ...


3

I'll assume you have just bought the router and are trying to set it up. You do not need the source code you downloaded, it is already installed on the router. They just make it available so that they are complying with the open source licensing. Connect your computer to the router using an ethernet cable, you should have got one in the box. Open a web ...


2

Per your interfaces settings, you need to let the kernel do Network Address Translation to route packets across these subnets. Try this first: # iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s 192.168.1.0/24 -d 192.168.2.0/24 -j SNAT --to 192.168.2.1 # iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s 192.168.2.0/24 -d 192.168.1.0/24 -j SNAT --to 192.168.1.1 Where 192.168.2.1 is the ...


2

As long as your router uses IPv4 or IPv6(99% of routers do), your problem isn't with the router. If you know what kind of network card you have, you can try to get Linux drivers for it by downloading them on a different computer onto a flash drive, then installing on your system. If you can tell me what kind of ethernet card you have(Or even the exact model ...


2

I figured it out! These links helped: http://www.rsyslog.com/tag/udp/ http://www.rsyslog.com/doc/multi_ruleset.html Here's what I did: Opened up /etc/rsyslog.d/50-default.conf and at the top of the file, before other all of the default filters, I added: # process remote messages # define new ruleset and add rules to it: $RuleSet remote *.* ...


2

You can use Bridge Mode in VirtualBox settings so that the VM appears to be on the same level as the host machine. This allows it to act on the network as if it were physically connected to it. In the VM, set the network settings to autodetect over DHCP or if that doesn't work, get the default gateway from the host, give it that gateway, an unused IP address ...


2

You need to configure network card in VM for bridged network, not for NAT if u want to host server for ssh in Virtalbox. Maybe it will help: http://codesupply.net/content/setup-bridged-networking-virtualbox-ubuntu-1110


2

This sounds like a problem with your cookie settings in your web browser. Not a problem with your internet service or connectivity. To see if this is the problem, log out and log in as the Guest selectable from the login screen and attempt to log in via firefox from there. Alternatively install an alternative browser and attempt to log in from for example; ...


2

The web browser may be blocking cookies. Try to change the settings in the web browser to "accept all cookies."


2

You can use Gogo6 and get an IPv6 address at the same time: On the server, download and install the Gogo6 client with: sudo apt-get install gogoc And get an account at http://www.gogo6.com/freenet6/registration for Freenet6. Then, run gksudo gedit /etc/gogoc/gogoc.conf(still on the server) and set the following settings: ...


2

Once you can connect to the machine from inside your LAN, the rest is completely outside of the control of Ubuntu running on that machine. So the problem is likely to be somewhere outside of your Ubuntu box. Possible causes may include: incorrectly configured port forwarding on your router. Note that the internal IP of your machine may change when you ...


2

None whatsoever. The function of a firewall is to block access to services that otherwise would allow it. Ubuntu has no listening services by default, so there is nothing to block. Further, since you are behind a NAT router, you already effectively have a firewall.


2

Solved by installing webmin. Then used it to reset iptables. Seriously, a great tool for administering the firewall. webmin told me 2 rules were in the iptables which it could not understand, so I save iprules to a file, did a reset and all the 3 PCs can share files. A defacto firewall is running all the time using iptables. So they must be modified. ...


2

I have had similar issues with router a year ago. "roadmr" has a great potential solution, but there is a slight chance you might be on 192.168.0.1 in which case you would enter smb://192.168.0.1 (or other depending on your ip) ...although the most common would be 192.168.1.1 as "roadmr" suggested. Apologies if you have already tried this, but... ...


2

I have this same router and just figured out how to access an external drive via Ubuntu. I wrote a blog post with the details but here's the short version: Install the smbfs package (sudo aptitude install smbfs). Create a directory in which to mount your external hard drive (e.g., sudo mkdir /media/public). Add a line to the file /etc/fstab (gksudo gedit ...


2

Edit the network connection (NetworkManager indicator -> Edit connections -> Wireless tab -> Select your connection -> "Edit" button). In the "Wireless" tab you'll find a "BSSID" textbox. Type in there the router MAC address you want to use and the connection will be locked to that router. My GUI is not in english, but I'm sure this screenshot properly ...


2

This website in the section of the webpage called Linksys e4200 Setup has step-by-step instructions for how to set up the Linksys e4200 router manually (without using the Windows installation CD) using the router's web interface at . To configure the Linksys e4200 router manually, start off with Step 1 and then skip Steps 2-6 and continue with Step 7 until ...


2

Generally, if you are using Network Manager, the /etc/network/interfaces file need only contain the loopback interface. Network Manager is supposed to handle all other details for us. I suggest you right-click the NM icon and select 'Edit Connections...' Select Wired and Wired Connection 1. Be sure that Connect Automatically is checked: If you are still ...


1

Free dynamic DNS services seem to be disappearing, so be prepared to pay for the service. This is still less expensive in most cases than securing a static IP address from your ISP. Regardless of who you choose for service from any of the dynamic DNS service providers, they should be able to provide service for a .co.uk domain. They will provide a list of ...



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