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If you want to do this in Terminal or SSH, instead of using your graphical interface, you just need prefix your commands with sudo. Eg: New folder: sudo mkdir testsite Edit a file: sudo nano index.html Also, a quick and dirty way of always giving yourself access: sudo chown -R username /var/www/html


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The accepted answer is not a proper way to do this. You should read: Whats the simplest way to edit and add files to "/var/www"? and follow the suggestions there.


-1

gksu nautilus /var/www/html in terminal


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The command chown -R root:root /home/faiz/Downloads will change ownership for all files and folders in Downloads. root is the new owner, so you're no longer allowed to access it. You can change it back using this command sudo chown -R faiz:faiz ~/Downloads, given that your username is faiz.


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you can change the password by following method:restart your system, go to recovery mode (inside advanced options for ubuntu), enter root option. now on command-line type passwd and enter. now enter new password, re-enter the password. afterwards type reboot. see whether your problem is solved.


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When you installed Ubuntu, you must have created an User and assigned a password to it, right? By default that user is an administrator and can ask for root privileges. So whenever asked for root password, just key in the password of the user.


1

The small ntfs partition is a Windows system partition. If you don't want one to be made, you will need to reformat the drive using something other than Windows, such as the partition utility for Ubuntu. Start the Ubuntu installer and partition the drive. You do not need to get all the partitions fully correct, just the Windows (NTFS). Make sure that you ...


0

First, try other suggestions while still logged in, because mine requires a reboot. If you see that no other attempt works, you should reboot and start a live DVD/USB session. Mount the root partition and edit the /etc/fstab as root. You will need to run a command similar to this: gksu gedit /media/ubuntu/sda1/etc/fstab Please adjust the path to the ...


4

As you can't use sudo, try the following command instead (you'll get root privileges with pkexec): pkexec chmod 755 / Tested ok in a VM: u@u-VirtualBox:/$ sudo chmod 3 / [sudo] password for u: u@u-VirtualBox:/$ ll ls: cannot open directory .: Permission denied u@u-VirtualBox:/$ sudo chmod 755 / sudo: unable to stat /etc/sudoers: No such file or ...


0

Try passwd -x 1. From man passwd: -x, --maxdays MAX_DAYS Set the maximum number of days a password remains valid. After MAX_DAYS, the password is required to be changed. This does not, of course, prevent your colleage from setting a password of their own choice, or using SSH keys to login. You could also try usermod -e. From man usermod: ...


0

Well, if your ftp user does not have write permission for the folder he is supposed to, he won't be able to. Either give that user write permissions to the specific folder, or ftp the files to a directory where he has write right, and then log in via ssh and move the files around. scp is also a more secure and as convenient way to copy some files to a ...


0

I am still a newbie so this may not be correct. You mentioned that you wanted to host your server securely and want to FTP stuff. Now I was under the impression that FTP was not the most secure way to transfer files. Maybe I am wrong. I wonder if scp would achieve what you want? Sorry to post a link but there is a lot of information here that could be ...


0

If you want to give others access to the drive, you can use the chmod command along with the -R parameter to invoke the command recursively. Here's an example: sudo chmod -R 666 /media/username/drivename To change ownership, you can use the chown command: sudo chown username:username /media/username/drivename Change "username" to your username and ...


1

By default, the Root account password is locked in Ubuntu. This means that you cannot login as Root directly or use the su command to become the Root user. However, since the Root account physically exists it is still possible to run programs with root-level privileges. This is where sudo comes in - it allows authorized users (normally "Administrative" ...


4

That message is telling to use sudo, you need to do sudo poweroff More info look at manpage


0

To mount as root, open terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T, and then typing in: sudo mount /dev/sdaX ..replacing X by the drive letter of the number of the drive you are trying to mount. To find the drive number, go under the "disks" application, or by typing "gnome-disks" in a separate terminal.


0

You can't write like that through a file descriptor using sudo, the echo runs as root, the output it generates does not. You must use sudo tee to elevate the access, example: echo 1 | sudo tee [path to sysfs] You can even append with tee using the -a switch. I do this all the time with ftrace. echo 'nvme_submit_request' | sudo tee ...


0

Try sudo su - this will change you to root, and try it this way. Sometimes I observed that this way I have more rights than simply with sudo


-1

I don't really know a way to automatically login using root but heres a way to login to root account from the greeter(Unity login screen). In the terminal type sudo gedit /usr/share/lightdm/lightdm.conf/50-unity-greeter.conf Then add the line greeter-show-manual-login=true And then restart and login by typing "root" as username and type in the root ...


0

Try, sudo su then nautilus Or sudo mv "file adress here" "destination here" in the terminal.


0

It sounds as if the USB drive is unproperly mounted (with the wrong permissions). If you are auto-mounting, this shouldn't happen. You can try manually mounting anyway. Check out this guide: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Mount/USB.


3

Having an administrative account on a Linux machine doesn't mean that every command you execute is automatically run with full permissions. This would be unwise and may even make your system unusable. To run a command with full access to the file system, you can add sudo before the command. This will run the following command as the actual root user, so it ...


0

This snippet would: Check on different sessions suggest to use sudo !! and return an error if [ "$(whoami &2>/dev/null)" != "root" ] && [ "$(id -un &2>/dev/null)" != "root" ] then echo "You must be root to run this script!" echo "use 'sudo !!'" exit 1 fi


1

You should send the notify message as the normal main user of your system, (ususally ID 1000): #!/bin/bash MAINUSER=$(cat /etc/passwd|grep 1000|sed "s/:.*$//g") su $MAINUSER -c $"notify-send -i \"/opt/say/logo.png\" \"Title\" \"Message\"" (not sure, how to call it like this in your python script, but I hope it helps)


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You should use pkexec gparted. The desktop and/or launcher shortcuts already do this.


3

I'd guess that at some point, files in your home directory became owned by root (because of misuse of sudo). Try chowning them back: sudo chown $USER:$USER ~ -R


0

To add to @bdep's comment - I don't have high enough reputation to comment, you will also need to change the following in the /etc/ssh/sshd_config file: #PasswordAuthentication no and replace it with PasswordAuthentication yes again - this is very dangerous and should only be used on non-publicly-accessible machines, but if you want to ssh to your ...


0

Use the terminal!1eleven (drag and drop) Open a terminal with Ctrl+Alt+t. To take ownership of the files again and continue in your filemanager, type the command sudo chown -R $USER:$USER and make sure there is a space at the end. Now drag the the affected file or folder from your filemanager to the terminal. The result should look like this: sudo chown ...


0

I tried both sudo usermod -a -G dialout $USER #(worked perfectly) And sudo chmod 666 /dev/ttyUSB0 (worked but had to type the command again) I also removed the mode manager but did not really help. Therefore, the best command that worked for me was sudo usermod -a -G dialout $USER


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Another technique is to copy using tar + ssh instead of scp: tar -c -C ./my/local/dir \ | ssh dimitris@myserver.com "sudo tar -x --no-same-owner -C /var/www"


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For 32 bit system: Press Ctrl+Alt+T on keyboard to open the terminal. When it opens, run the command below to update your package lists: sudo apt-get update Then open Ubuntu Software Center, search for and install the package flashplugin-installer. It extracts the 32-bit Flash player library from the adobe-flashplugin package (which is retrieved from ...


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I think Ubuntu’s web app integration has changed in 14.04. When you create a web app for a service like Gmail, Facebook, Ubuntu will now use the same browser used on Ubuntu Mobile. This theoretically makes web apps more consistent between the desktop and mobile versions of Ubuntu, but it’s a problem if you actually want to use these apps. This browser ...


1

You can't run apt-get without root privileges, try the same command with sudo: sudo apt-get install dh-modaliases



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