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0

This is how it's supposed to be. As a normal user you are only interested and have access to your home folder, which is under /home Open a terminal and type ls -l /home (that's a lowercase L, not a numerical one) and you'll see that there is a directory named after your username and its ownership is set to you. This is where you put your work.


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Ubuntu does not set the password for root on installation. Instead, run sudo -i and enter the password of the user which is logged in. You are now root. If you want to use su command to become root type passwd root after you have gained root privileges with "sudo -i". After the root password is set you should be able to run "su".


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Got the solution "--sudo --use-sudo-password" helped doing it ! $knife bootstrap 52.8.178.221 -x ubuntu -i ~/Keys/chef1.pem --sudo --use-sudo-password


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This answer is complementary to Heather's one (which will work). First of all, take into account that in Unix (and Linux) if one is able to take root privileges, they can do anything. In the case of Heather answer, nothing will stop your user to just sudo /usr/bin/applicationcommand (with a bit of search for the real path or whatever). But I suppose this ...


2

By default, it's the members of the sudo group, and the root user, by virtue of these files in /etc/polkit/localauthority.conf.d/: $ tail /etc/polkit-1/localauthority.conf.d/* ==> /etc/polkit-1/localauthority.conf.d/50-localauthority.conf <== # Configuration file for the PolicyKit Local Authority. # # DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE, it will be overwritten on ...


5

Try using setuid from package super. Do sudo apt-get install super, then create a shell script that can only be run as root. Have that shell script run only one command: #!/bin/sh setuid $ORIG_USER applicationcommand exit 0 Then, set an alias for each of the users so that applicationcommand points to the shell script you created by adding into each of ...


2

It's only dangerous because you can delete important files accidentally. On servers and such, giving root a password can make the computer vulnerable to attack, since the all-powerful root is accessible to use to delete files. The only reason logging in as root or using programs as root that I can think of is the possibility of accidentally deleting ...


1

Unfortunately, some folders have to have certain owners and permissions to make Ubuntu work. You can, however, just run the file browser as root. In Xubuntu, the file browser is thunar. So, running sudo thunar will let you do anything in the file browser as root. If you want a way to run Thunar as root without typing anything, you can go to ...


4

Complete Solution: The following steps will help you achieve the desired output: Create a new script file (replace create_dir.sh with your desired script name): vim ~/create_dir.sh The script will be created in the user’s home directory Add some commands that only a root or sudo user can execute like creating a folder at the root directory level: mkdir ...


2

This should do the trick: sudo chown $USER [filenames] Note: $USER is literal, replace [filenames] with one or many file names or globs, for example: sudo chown $USER *.md


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The is necessary to change the owner of the files to your user: sudo chown $USER:$USER file file file ....


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You need to either change the permissions of those files, or change the owner. To change the permissions use chmod, and to change the owner use chown As a quick and dirty fix try sudo chmod 777 <filename>. Using permission 777 is a bad idea as it gives every permission to every user.


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In Ubuntu setup, you cannt set a blank password. That's how UNIX and UNIX-like operating systems work to protect some of the administrators functionnality that can affect the system. So there is a password and you have to find the one that set it up.


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To make changes in the directory /usr/lib/libreoffice/share you should have sudo privileges. Ubuntu doesn't use a root account by default, so you have to use append sudo before you run any command that requires root privileges. For example, if you are trying to edit a file config/soffice.cfg/modules/sglobal/menubar/menubar.xml using nano you should run: ...


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I found out that is was really simple, all you have to do is run the following command and it adds a password to root.sudo passwd root.


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Usually packages are installed in /usr/lib (part of root) or /opt directory. Most of the app will use space allocated to root. Some exceptional cases installs modules only available to single user goes in local directory.


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You could configure sudo to not need a password for a particular command and go back to using a non-root cron. For this, assuming a user id of "user" wants to run the command FreeFileSync as root, create a file /etc/sudoers.d/user with user ALL = NOPASSWD: /usr/bin/FreeFileSync The command must be given with a full pathname. If you don't explicitly list ...


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If you look at this page here in the Superuser & Password Designation section, you will see that it specifically states that: Note: GRUB 2 1.99 in 12.04 LTS doesn't protect submenu, ie. command line, entry editing and access to entries is not protected! See bug 718670. However, they claim that the work around would be to add export superusers ...


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Solution I also changed something and it was looking like loop back always when I tried to log in, but the solution is next: When you are on login screen open TTY by pressing Ctrl+Alt+F1, if you have enabled functional keys press Ctrl+Alt+Fn+F1. Login to your account on TTY session using your login credentials. In TTY session type command: sudo su and ...



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