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1

If you try to open it from Nautilus file manager, root is labeled as a Computer in Places sidebar. Or, in Terminal you can use a cd command to change directory: cd / "/" is a root directory on Linux.


0

Well, the safety locks are there for a purpose, and you may learn more by studying why the locks are there in the first place. Having said that: Give user administration permissions: Inexperienced users: don't do this. You will break your system. sudo usermod -u 0 [username] Disable telnet login for a particular user, without disabling local login: Open ...


-2

the best way is: useradd to add a user passwd (pass for the user) usermod -a -G <user> sudo to add users to the sudo group


7

Add a shortcut to your launcher. I would not change the main command of the gedit launcher. Do the following: Never edit the default launcher, first copy the one from /usr/share/applications to ~/.local/share/applications: cp /usr/share/applications/gedit.desktop ~/.local/share/applications/gedit.desktop Edit the file with... gedit (not with gksudo) ...


0

You can modify the owner by opening a terminal up and typing in `chown user /path/to/file like Byte Commander stated you can do this. However, setting the the owner isnt enough. because you're accessing a root placed file in a root only access folder. You need to give your self full permissions. To make your self like root for that file only you need to ...


1

The way you added authorised keys, you haven't added your user's key to root's authorised keys. You have added your own key to your authorised keys and root's key to root's authorised keys. Instead do: sudo tee -a /root/.ssh/authorized_keys < ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub


0

That may be because you have not assigned the filesystem type (ext4). Maybe this question can also help you => "No root file system defined" error while installing ubuntu


0

If the BIOS does not allow you to boot from USB or DVD use the following methods: A. Upgrade your BIOS (refer to your manufacturer's web site for more information) OR B. Hardware solution: remove the hard drive from the laptop, put it in an external enclosure Boot from DVD and install on the (now external) HDD move the external HDD back into your ...


0

First, you should check what's using up all that space with the "Disk Usage Analyzer" tool that ships with Ubuntu. From a terminal, run: gksudo baobab / That should give you an idea of what uses so much space. Then: Check how much space /root uses. Usually it should be less than 1MB. If you have anything larger in there, move it to your /home. Check ...


0

Just wanted to put this out there since on a normal iso install root account is disabled (unless maybe you enabled it) I'm going to assume you didn't and you're using a cloud based service like maybe Digital Ocean, as they have root enabled unless you setup a key. If this is the case, as I also use digital ocean, I find it is sometimes easier to allow ...


0

By default when you install Ubuntu you should not know root password. It exists, but user should not know it. An admin, of course, could choose to alter the password with sudo passwd but generally it should not be necessary, unless you know what you're doing and why you're doing it. A file that contains information on all user passwords is /etc/shadow and ...


2

You can use the passwd command: # passwd -S root P 11/04/2014 -1 -1 -1 -1 # passwd -l root passwd: password expiry information changed. # passwd -S root L 11/04/2014 -1 -1 -1 -1 # passwd -d root passwd: password expiry information changed. # passwd -S root NP 11/04/2014 -1 -1 -1 -1 From man 1 passwd: -S, --status Display account status ...


0

Easy. Hit Ctrl+Alt+F1. This will bring to a separate terminal. Try to login as root by typing root as your login and providing the password. If the root account is enabled, the login will work. If the root account is disabled, the login will fail. To get back to your GUI, hit Ctrl+Alt+F7.


6

PermitRootLogin is an sshd (the daemon) setting, not an ssh (the client) setting. It should go into /etc/ssh/sshd_config, where I'm reasonably certain you'll find a PermitRootLogin line.


1

One possibility is to look into /etc/passwd by entering grep root /etc/passwd It should show a line starting like root:x: ...... where the x indicates that encrypted passwords are stored in the shadow file. If this is the case, we look into it by running sudo grep root /etc/shadow (shadow file needs sudo to be opened!) You should get a line beginning ...


2

The Setuid bit is not set. If it were, the permissions would have an s instead of the first x: $ ls -l /usr/bin/sudo -rwsr-xr-x 1 root root 155008 Feb 11 2014 /usr/bin/sudo Try using pkexec to set it correctly: pkexec chmod a=rx,u+ws /usr/bin/sudo Though I doubt that's the only problem you are going to have.


1

the "vagrant" user will not have permissions to do anything in /root because it will have 0700 perms. Therefore anything in /root or in any subdirectory under /root etc will not be accessible by any use other than root. Prefix it with sudo and it should work. This is the correct setup and I strongly recommend that you leave /root's perms as 0700. Don't ...


0

You would try this(sorry by my english, I'm latin) So, run the next commands: adb shell setprop ro.secure 0 adb shell setprop ro.debuggable 1 shell setprop persist.service.adb.enable 1 adb root Thats may work on some devices, try by yourself and good luck


2

You run here only echo with sudo command, but - his input/output/stderr are from regular user. If you wish to write to file as root user, you can't use > from shell. Instead use for example tee command: echo 300 |sudo tee /sys/block/md0/md/stripe_cache_size


3

The "echo 300" is executed using sudo, which outputs 300 to stdout in the normal way. Then as your normal user, you are trying to take that output and write to /sys/ Sudo isn't a magic command that elevates privileges for your whole command line. It takes the arguments you passed to it and executes them as a program. Bash (which is running as a normal user) ...


0

You use putty gen to generate a key, then on the ssh computer you set the pubkey to work with the ssh server. If you need more guidance may I recommend reading this site: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-set-up-ssh-keys--2 Thanks hope this helps!


2

When you open a terminal, the default directory is /home/USER. To access the "computer", basically the address is only /. So you can easily, use two methods: cd / or cd ../.. (when you type cd .. it means you go back a directory (making it to /home and then, twice, gets you to /) edit: You can always type pwd to know the current directory.


1

sudo su su - change user ID or become superuser sudo bash bash - GNU Bourne-Again SHell sudo fish fish - is a smart and user-friendly command line shell for OS X, Linux, and the rest of the family. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_shell#Shell_categories Bourne-Again shell (bash) and Friendly interactive shell (fish) both are shell types.


2

sudo su executes su as if you were the root user. That means, the shell that is opened is the shell given in the entry of the user in /etc/passwd in the 6th field. In case of your systems root user it might be /bin/fish. That shell is executed as login shell, so the rc-scripts of the root user are executed. When you execute sudo fish, then the application ...


1

I also had the same issue..But I didn't want to restore everything..I found the best fix here in this blog. You can simple login to the recovery mode and reset sudo access. (I'm not good in this, but I'll post what I did here) restart the pc, press SHIFT key while Ubuntu is booting. This will bring you up the boot menu. Go to Advanced Options. Select ...



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