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You can also go to /usr/share/applications in ubuntu and edit the launch file of the application you are trying to run. Like i edited the file of github atom, normally i use a wildcard to find the files like this sudo nano atom* This will open the atom.desktop file, now find the Exec command and prepend gksudo.For eg., Before ...


0

Depends. I don't recall if ubuntu uses busybox, if so, your commands are those available in busybox. To see a list, type this: busybox --list Or busybox -h Beyond that, available programs are determined by your PATH environment variable. Generally, these are the same as those in the terminal. Any executable that is in your PATH will be available as ...


0

If you look, for example for your first file, here: http://za.archive.ubuntu.com/dists/vivid-updates/main/binary-amd64/ you'll notice that the size of these files is barely 100k, so you have something pesky going on --- probably a network failure or something like that. Have you tried to check the content of these monster files? Is the filesystem clean? ...


0

sudo apt-get update updates the package manager with the latest versions of software - this is what the two .bz2 files are. It does not actually install new software. You need to follow sudo apt-get update with sudo apt-get upgrade, which will install the latest versions of everything. You can combine them into one command with sudo apt-get update ...


0

Not only recovery mode can give access to root, also any live medial such as bootable USB or Live CD/DVD could also drop you to have sudo permission. Some helpful notes: Secure your Grub Menu with password Remove the ability to boot from USB / CD /DVD or any other removable media Secure your BIOS with a password BUT Any physical access to your PC ...


0

This can be done without reinstalling. Follow this tutorial. Basically, when booting, you press shift then mount the partition and you are logged in as root without asking for the password. Then you just passwd and set a new password.


2

Type sudo su in the terminal. This will open a root session. Be very careful, as you can do very bad things with this. If you want to run a program in a GUI as root, type "gksudo". However, this thread may be of use to you. It is much more dangerous than simply using sudo. If you want to do it, you can. (Command is sudo passwd -u root [password])


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Like the process you define your own environment variable, for example by edit '~/.bashrc', you can define root's environment variable by edit '/root/.bashrc'.


0

Install Baobab a.k.a. Disk Space Analyzer and drill down to find where the files are created. Most likely it's some process creating tons of files or continuously writing to a temp file


0

Try switch in another TTY (Alt + F1 as example). In the TTY kill or restart your GUI session.


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In archlinux, /bin, /lib, lib64, /sbin are all symlinks and this works fine. I don't see why it's not working with you. You should have done that while the system was not running. Also, if you use partition and mount them, then I don't see why you need to use symlink at all ? For example, copy only the content of /lib/* into your new partition and mount it ...


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sudo works with a mechanism that is called setuid (Set User ID, or also called suid). If that bit is set on an executable file (like sudo), then the application is executed under the permissions of the user, who is the owner of that file (in case of sudo, the owner is the root user). That means, sudo is executed as root. So far so good. But, now nothing ...


0

You need to enable Developer Mode first in order to see this menu entry. To enable Developer Mode: System Settings About this phone Developer mode (last point on this page)


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As to part 1 of this post: Swap with those specs is purely a preference but even /home is not required BUT given your use case HIGHLY HIGHLY recommended as /home is where all those imaging files will go NOT root (/). as for part 2 of this post: you will need to better define "maxing it out" but also of note LibreOffice and kingsoft Office are BOTH in ...


0

Add your second admin to the "admin" group: sudo usermod -a -G admin userName Also make sure that the /etc/sudoers file has the following line: %admin ALL=(ALL) ALL This allows people in group "admin" to run any and all commands by prepending them with "sudo" as this: sudo edit /etc/apache2/apache2.conf sudo service apache restart


0

In the sudoers file, You can allow them to sudo run certain commands as certain users. ie. taken from the linked help dgb boulder = (operator) /bin/ls, (root) /bin/kill, /usr/bin/lprm Then user dgb is now allowed to run /bin/ls as operator, but /bin/kill and /usr/bin/lprm as root. You will need to find the applications that he will need to be able ...


0

Use: sudo chown root.root /usr /usr/lib Do you need guarantee that /usr and /usr/lib are with root owner for user and group, usually you can found user 501.501 in this directories.


2

sudo su means run the command su as sudo which means as root. Here the system will ask you for your password since you are a sudoer. So when you offer your password then you are now working with root ability so when you run now su by the time you are using root abilities so you don't need any password. It's same as if you are a root then su to any other ...


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This is the intended behavior of vim (and vi). When you edit a readonly file, attempting to write the file the usual way (with :w) fails. This is to prevent you from accidentally changing a readonly file you might not wish to change. If you really want to override the readonly permissions on a file that you own, and write your changes to the file, you must ...


0

If myuser is in the sudo group, then this order of the lines won't provide passwordless access (as noted by Florian Diesch), because the 3rd line overrides the 1st one. myuser ALL=(www-data:www-data) NOPASSWD: ALL # Allow members of group sudo to execute any command %sudo ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL So just put the lines into this order: # Allow members of ...


1

To enable root login for SSH first enable root account by giving password to root sudo passwd Now, you need to edit /etc/ssh/sshd_config gksudo gedit /etc/ssh/sshd_config Remove the (#) comment from this line: PermitRootLogin without-password directly under it add this: PermitRootLogin yes Now restart SSH: sudo service ssh restart Enable Root ...


8

What a bad idea. Don't do that! I quote (@ByteCommander): Running a web browser as root and not even requesting a password for this is BAD! Would you also ask somebody how to modify your front door so that it can always be opened without a key? Probably not... Visit only one malicous website and you have a big problem.


1

run the command sudo visudo then add username ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:/usr/bin/firefox What does this mean? sudo visudo means to edit the sudoer file username ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:/usr/bin/firefox this means to give a run the firefox using sudo for user username wirth no password. Now how to make it available to your launcher. gksudo gedit ...


0

TL;DR: Do things as root only when you have to. sudo makes this pretty easy. If you enable root logins, you can still follow this rule, you just have to be careful to do so. Although enabling root logins is not actually insecure if done right, you don't need to enable root logins because you have sudo. There are really two related questions here. Why is ...


-1

If it's your computer and if you are only one user, the password should be the same as login password. Otherwise it will be predefined password either from another user or Ubuntu


1

The actual command for launching vmware player from the terminal is vmplayer, That is why it wasn't launching for you. To launch vmware player as root just run the following command from the terminal. gksu vmplayer I know you found a workaround for your problem but I hope this helps anyway. Also it is apparently not advisable to run desktop ...



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