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When you install Ubuntu, the first user you create has sudo access. If that's how you are logged on, and you don't have sudo access, you must have messed up something. Boot from installation media, mount your root partition and edit /etc/sudoers to include your username (and/or edit your groups file to include your username to the sudo group). By default, ...


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If your are sure you have been hacked then the course of action is clear, get an iso make sure its not compromised, make yourself a LIVE CD/USB and do a clean install while disconnected from any network. IF already someone got access to your machine he might have changed essential parts which allows him to gain entry again and again even if you change your ...


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rm -R A" or sudo rm -R A" doesn't work (not even as root) because " is a special character which must be escaped with a backslash \ otherwise it's interpreted by the shell (and that has nothing to do with permissions or ownership of the file/folder). Since all the foldernames (except Speciale) start with a letter & end with a " you can delete them ...


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There is no 'root' account available for login by default. It is locked in a default installation. You don't state where your install runs from, so I am going to assume it's running from your remote user account on the server. You can enable the root account if you wish, but there's more 'secure' approaches to do this, than just enabling the account. ...


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Note: This will not work if "Easy Install" option in VMware is used, which will automatically set up Ubuntu with a default set of settings. When prompted to create the Virtual Machine, select the Ubuntu version in the OS type, but don't specify the ISO and use "I will install the operating system later", do not automatically power up the VM, and edit the ...


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Since root login is not possible by default because of security concerns you can do sudo su or sudo -i in terminal(ctrl+alt+t). Which then asks for your user password. This will be accepted because youre in the proper group called sudoers. Typing exit will bring you back to your normal user.


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"GUI for root user" is considered harmful*, but, here's an explanation of your problem: xhost tells the X Server that it may/may not accept connections from other hosts. When upstart runs your script, no user has logged in and started an X Server. Therefore, xhost has nobody to talk to. You need to delay execution of your xhost command until after ...


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I managed to solve this problem eventually. so the weird part was that as soon as i deleted a few files which were a bit large enough to free off some space, the space magically got occupied again after about 30 seconds. We finally found a large file of about 70G which were the CUPS logs. So somehow my system was acting as a print server and the CUPS ...


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The technical concept you're looking for is known as Privilege Separation. With this concept, each program uses the privileges granted to the user running the application, which is enforced by the operating system's security modules. When a user needs to do something that's outside of their normal privileges, the system challenges the user in order to grant ...


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Your question is a bit vague, but you seem to be asking about the principle of least privilege, which basically says that a system is most secure when each piece only has the permissions necessary to do its own tasks. This limits the possibility of damage from mistakes or malicious actions. An ordinary user typically does not need to be modifying ...


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It is possible if Windows mount was done with another uid/gid. Please check your /etc/fstab according to the ArchWiki instructions. Basically, your mount line should looks like that: UUID=01CD2ABB65E17DE0 /media/Windows ntfs-3g uid=user,gid=users,dmask=022,fmask=133 0 0 where user is your $USER and users is your group (probably $USER also).


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You want to kill a process owned as root without sudo. This is impossible - either you are super user or have sudo powers, or you aren't. If you aren't then you have to either let it finish the process... or do the much more evil option and shut off the system. If a shutdown won't work then a power off will - you can damage the filesystem this way but the ...


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(Not sure why a question from 2014 pops up again on the homepage, but anyway :D ) It's probably not a good idea to mess with the overall permissions of the rest of the file system, like it has been suggested in the other answer. A better way would be to use a feature called "chroot". "chroot", short for "change root", just does that: It changes the root of ...


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hehe my specialty ;) computer security is a hobby of mine... when you start up the computer you will get a grub screen that displays the normal bootup option and below that "Advanced options for ubuntu" select that and go to one of the recovery terminals... reboots my computer... select the 2nd one in that menu it'll say "ubuntu with generic (recovery mode)" ...


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The issue with using a straight sudo nautilus is that it will sometimes try to use configuration files from your user's home directory. This can cause root (superpriviledged user) to change permissions on files within your home directory. This is not usually harmful long-term; it can cause annoying problems like refusing to login to your desktop, but you ...


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lightdm, the display manager in Ubuntu allows running session setup scripts as root if you add appropriate entry to /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf file (Note, that this file doesn't exist as of 14.04, you have to manually create it). Example of how it might look like [SeatDefaults] # session-setup-script = Script to run when starting a user session (runs as ...


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I am actually doing this right now to my home folder. You will need to read the link HERE Do this but in the fstab entry replace home with root. :)



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