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0

By default only root can edit /var/www/ Use sudo chmod 771 /var/www/ To change the permission to allow group users to write to it.


1

Most problably your OpenCV was installed as root, and hence its owner is root. Try running these commands in terminal: Get to know yourself whoami Locate OpenCV directory (sudo may be needed) whereis opencv Go to OpenCV directory cd /path/from/whereis Change ownership recursively to yourself sudo chown -R [whoami] .


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I don't know how or even why you tried to copy the rules file. I suggest you use nano and create the file where you want to have it. Related: How to edit files in a terminal with nano? How to configure ADB access for Android devices?


-1

Open any terminal (ie press ctrl-alt-t) Enter the following command: sudo nautilus Enter your password What looks like an ordinary file manager will appear, but it will have root permissions everywhere. Be very careful. You can do some real damage with that much power. Please be sure to exit that file manager when you are done.


0

Well you can do it with your file manager used with super user privileges. Try gksu nautilus on terminal and try using the nautilus instance provided. But this is not recommended if you don't know really what you are doing.


0

No, it is not okay. Of course there will be errors. You will render your filesystem inaccessible to you. And will probably have to boot to a live environment to fix it.


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the 1st q: How to run sudo command with no password? to become root: sudo su WiFi asks authentication because the owner of WiFi access point set it up this way. He did not want to allow free access to his internet. So contact him and talk.


0

It is not possible to login as root (administrator) from the login screen on Ubuntu. When you do something that does require administrator rights, you type in your password for your user, if it's the first user created on the machine. To do this in terminal when executing commands as administrator just use "sudo" in front of the regular commands and type ...


0

You can easily find your answers by googling! In order to run a command with root privilege, you can use sudo or su commands. (your authentication password was set when you were installing Ubuntu). if you are using a live cd,for authentication just press Enter. There are many many Ubuntu tutorials on the web, just take a look at some of them. Your problems ...


1

You are right, if you did that, you changed the mode of / of the live-system, but you want to change the mode of / of your root-partition on your hard-disk, so you first need to mount your hard-disk. Assuming your root-partition is /dev/sda2, enter mount /dev/sda2 /mnt to mount your root-partition to /mnt. Then change to that mount-point and change the ...


0

Start by: Run DEJA backup GUI and configure what you want to backup and where to save your backup files, without clicking backup now, just save your backup setting and exit Deja GUI. Start terminal ALT+CTRL+T and type this command when you are ready to start backup sudo deja-dup --backup. GUI window will open and backup should start.


0

The above methods didn't work for me, because I couldn't "log back in as root" (unknown password) But I got a root shell by editing vi /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf autologin-user=root greeter-show-manual-login=true After rebooting I was finally able to run chown root:root /usr/bin/sudo && chmod 4755 /usr/bin/sudo


1

If you're logged as a normal user, say, chris, your desktop will be at /home/chris/Desktop, not /home/desktop. If you're logged in as root (which should be impossible to do with a normal Ubuntu installation), your desktop will be at /root/Desktop.


0

maybe your CD have defects you should try to install it via usb. if you have a windows machine you can use this software: http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/ its easy and you will manage to create a USB to boot it.


0

That looks like your main filesystem has some errors, mounting as read-only (the Read-only file system message) and the checks at bootup aren't fixing them. Did you try pressing f to attempt to fix it when it said to? If it doesn't fix it automatically you may need to log into a recovery mode or with a live cd/usb/dvd and then fsck your partitions See man ...


1

You need root permissions to do that. Open a terminal and launch Nautilus as root: sudo nautilus or gksu nautilus enter your password and you're good to go. Be carefull because root permissions can screw up your whole system!


6

I would have done this like this: #!/bin/bash if [ "$(id -u)" != "0" ]; then echo "This script must be run as root" 1>&2 exit 1 fi Mind that id=0 is what is used inside the kernel to identify the superuser (or root). edit: it will be even better to redirect to STDERR. Here is a one-liner :) (( EUID )) && echo ‘You need to be ...


0

cat dumps the text to the terminal. IMO better tools exist, especially for large files. cd ~/Desktop less file.txt nano file.txt nano will allow you to edit the file less will allow page up / page down search (with less and most) using the "/" key and typing the word to search. You may need to install most ;)


0

How one reads the contents of a text file located on the desktop using the terminal: For the logged-in user's desktop: cat ~/Desktop/filename.txt For desktop of another user: cat /home/username/Desktop/filename.txt


-1

Cat is a UNIX command that lets you read text files. So, you can just run the command cat ~/Desktop/FILENAMEHERE unless you are root. If you are root, you must type cat /home/*/Desktop/FILENAMEHERE. Also, you should upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04 or 14.10. THis isn't Windows. It's not okay to use an older version of Ubuntu like it is when you use Windows. You ...


1

Open a terminal window. By default, you will be in your home directory. cd Desktop ls cat "filename"


-1

Use su or sudo sh to get a su-shell.


0

System Cron jobs are listed in /etc/crontab file. Therefore editing this file directly will help you out to run the reboot command as root. therefore, $ sudo vi /etc/crontab # Example of job definition: # .---------------- minute (0 - 59) # | .------------- hour (0 - 23) # | | .---------- day of month (1 - 31) # | | | .------- month (1 - 12) OR ...


1

I have three solution suggestions for you. Invoke the crontab with crontab -e -u root Make sure that you have an empty line at the end of the cronjob file, meaning that every line ends with a newline. You might need to redirect the output to devnull: shutdown -r now > /dev/null Here are two helpful webpages for cronjobs: CRON Tester CRON Generator ...


-2

36 17 * * * etc .. 36 17 is not a way to specify the right time in your cron. check via date command to see if your system is working in US time or Europ time use 17 36 if europ time and if your system use 24 H time or 5 36 if your system use US TIME and 12 H time


1

Warning; not tested because I think it's not such a great idea, even for a VM (bad habits are difficult to remove...). I think this is a PAM thing (PAM=pluggable authentication modules). In /etc/pam.d there are all the PAM configuration files that tell the system how to do the authentication of users. Now, the module that check for the passwords "unix ...


0

try sudo -s It will ask your password to login in as root. then use passwd to change the root password. if you are not in sudo user type sudo visudo add this line in the last ALL=NOPASSWD: ALL then ctrl+x to exit then y to save the changes then try again sudo -s it will login to root without asking password


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Type: sudo visudo Go to the end of the file and type: <username> ALL=NOPASSWD: ALL Press Ctrl+X to exit, and press Y to save the changes. Now open System Settings->Keyboard in that go to the Shortcut tab. Launch terminal, press Space and Backspace; it will disable it. Now go to Custom Shortcuts and click the plus (+) button at the bottom. ...



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