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1

To enable root login for SSH first enable root account by giving password to root sudo passwd Now, you need to edit /etc/ssh/sshd_config gksudo gedit /etc/ssh/sshd_config Remove the (#) comment from this line: PermitRootLogin without-password directly under it add this: PermitRootLogin yes Now restart SSH: sudo service ssh restart Enable Root ...


7

What a bad idea. Don't do that! I quote (@ByteCommander): Running a web browser as root and not even requesting a password for this is BAD! Would you also ask somebody how to modify your front door so that it can always be opened without a key? Probably not... Visit only one malicous website and you have a big problem.


1

run the command sudo visudo then add username ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:/usr/bin/firefox What does this mean? sudo visudo means to edit the sudoer file username ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:/usr/bin/firefox this means to give a run the firefox using sudo for user username wirth no password. Now how to make it available to your launcher. gksudo gedit ...


0

TL;DR: Do things as root only when you have to. sudo makes this pretty easy. If you enable root logins, you can still follow this rule, you just have to be careful to do so. Although enabling root logins is not actually insecure if done right, you don't need to enable root logins because you have sudo. There are really two related questions here. Why is ...


0

You need to edit the configuration for lightdm (the application that logs you in). Open /usr/share/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d/50-ubuntu.conf and add the following line: greeter-show-manual-login=true at the bottom. After a reboot you should be able to enter root as the account you wish to log in as. More information can be found here.


-1

If it's your computer and if you are only one user, the password should be the same as login password. Otherwise it will be predefined password either from another user or Ubuntu


2

The actual command for launching vmware player from the terminal is vmplayer, That is why it wasn't launching for you. To launch vmware player as root just run the following command from the terminal. gksu vmplayer I know you found a workaround for your problem but I hope this helps anyway. Also it is apparently not advisable to run desktop ...


0

sudo chmod -R +rwx /usr/local/bin/FastQC Should have set the read / write / execute flag to /usr/local/bin/FastQC and to its content for the owner, for the group and for the others, but from your ls -la output the group and the others are missing the write flag: drwxr-xr-x 3 kat kat 4096 mei 8 14:20 . [...] drwxr-xr-x 7 kat kat 4096 mei 8 14:20 ...


0

I think /usr/local/bin/FastQC is a symlinked directory and since you said you already own it, then probably you may have to add the execute permission to the original location where the fastqc program is. Also note at what step the script crashes - is the script trying to create any files/directories at places you don't have permission to, etc..


0

I got the same error. I end up putting FastQC to /usr/share, as many other packages are put there, and put a link to /usr/local/bin, as suggested by the installation guide. Then I changed the permissions to files under FastQC. sudo ln -s /path/to/FastQC/fastqc /usr/local/bin/fastqc sudo chmod -R 755 /path/to/FastQC


0

I also occurred same problem but I can solve it using following link http://blog.wittchen.biz.pl/ubuntu-system-boot-problem/ Attempt #1 First, I tried to change rootdelay as error message said. I opened file /etc/default/grub I found there the following line: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" and changed it to: ...


2

When you try to disable the root account but it is already disabled, passwd does not inform you that the root account was already disabled. But this is not a problem. passwd: password expiry information changed. is the expected output of a successful run of passwd -dl root, even if the root password is already disabled. As muru says, passwd commands that ...


0

I found out how to fix it! I needed to remove the X server I was using, and replace it with the default server included in Ubuntu.


2

I'm going to say that, if you try to disable the root account when it's not enabled, Ubuntu will just tell you so and exit. I think that's what you're asking.


0

From your other question: Run sudo usermod -a -G sudo <username> to add your user back to the sudo group.


0

Reinstalling Unity would be sudo apt-get install --reinstall ubuntu-desktop but I don't know if this will help. Of course you can access and copy your files from the TTY - you can do everything there if you don't mind a little typing... You know the directory and file name of your document? Super! Just run the following command to copy it wherever you ...


0

Sudo apt-get install, but i had something like you have now in the past. Did it happened while you where running a update and the screen locked by automatic screenlocker? That was what happened to me, and had the same problem, but i did run the update again in tty and problem was solved. Maybe it works also with you.


1

https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/xen-3.1/+bug/1167281 "stdin: is not a tty" due to "mesg n" instead of "tty -s && mesg n" in .profil Try the said method and see if it helps. The difference is, in case your problem is also caused by the "mesg n' in yout ptogilt,


6

What is "root"? root is a user existing on every Linux system. To be more precise, it is a special user - the super user! root is the only user that has privileges to do everything. In contrast to the two types of user accounts you can create (administrator users and restricted users), it exists by default and can neither be renamed or deleted. Usually, ...


2

root is the user name or account that by default has access to all commands and files on a Linux or other Unix-like operating system. It is also referred to as the root account, root user and the superuser. So there will arise certain cases when you will have to be logged in as root user to run those commands. Do not worry it is simple. By default, the ...


4

The answer is right there in the lsattr output: # lsattr .. ----i--------e-- ../web2 The folder is immutable, even by root.


1

if you look carefully at the getfacl output at the top of your post you'll see this: # owner: root # group: root user::rwx group::r-x other::r-x As you can see, the user root has write access but the group root does not. kchinnam post here has a good explanation as to why this is a problem and the same thread also describes how to use setfacl to allow a ...


0

Sounds like your Xserver died because of some corrupted configuration file in your /home directory. I suggest you reboot in recovery mode, check the filesystem, do a cleaup, and then, reboot and try again. If it still doesn't work, reboot recovery, command line as root, and create a new user, reboot and try to see if with that user works. If it works, then ...


0

Press Ctrl + Alt + F1 then login there - does it allow you to? Also, I assume you changed the password by doing (<username> replaced by your username): passwd <username>


2

A dirty workaround would be to set your account to not prompt for sudo passwords, but that is not recommended for security purposes. if you type "sudo visudo" you should be able to add an entry for your user that looks like this: # User privilege specification root ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL username ALL=NOPASSWD: ALL This may or may not work for the ...


-4

Ubuntu is designed like that. It happens that if you need root privileges to run an application the files created with that could need root privileges as well to be opened. you can sudo -i to become root and do your stuff, or change the privileges of the files sudo chmod 666 <yourfile> to read them



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