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1

I assume your MySQL server is running. Check the password for your MySQL user root and the access rights for this user in the mysql.user table. Do this in a terminal with the mysql command. If that's not possible, run sudo apt-get purge phpmyadmin* again and answer the question ┌────────────────────────────────────────────────────┤ Configuring ...


0

This can be easily undone. Boot into recovery mode using grub, and get to a terminal. Then type in sudo usermod -U username Where (username) is your username. That should unlock your account.


0

If at all possible, you should probably develop this from a live DVD/USB so that you don't have to worry about making a mistake. Push your work to a remote server just in case and then do all of your development on the live device so if something goes wrong, you can just wipe it and reinstall it without losing any personal data.


2

It seems that you're trying to delete the folder from within the folder itself and giving a non-existing path for rm to delete. Do something like: cd ~/tmp sudo rm -rf remaster-iso


0

If your goal is to remove the / folder and all subfolders, you could boot to a Live PenDrive and use Gparted to remove the partition that / is on and rebuild it, if that is what you want. If you want all other folders under root that are on separate partitions, you could do the same with the other partitions. You just can't do it on purpose from the ...


5

So I did it in a running Ubuntu 14.10 VM inside Virtualbox. I did not bother to install it myself but downloaded one directly from osboxes.org Running sudo rm -rf --no-preserve-root / in a terminal caused this: Some buttons began to disappear in the launcher Then the launcher was gone And finally all the desktop with the terminal running disappeared Left ...


7

I did try this out on a live USB for answering a question on Quora some time ago (there's another great answer there by Eric Bowersox). First attempt on an installed system where I was confident nothing would happen: # cd / # rm -rf / rm: it is dangerous to operate recursively on `/' rm: use --no-preserve-root to override this failsafe # rm -rf . rm: ...


4

just kill the command again: go the terminal from which you run the command sudo nautilus and then press the key Ctrl+C Or easily just close the terminal by clicking on X, this would kill nautilus process


-2

I think you haven`t root password and you must created. Type the following command: sudo passwd The following message will appear: [sudo] password for [username]: [Type your user password and press return] After that another message will appear, the following: Type new UNIX password: [Type the root password you want] Now the last thing you need to do, ...


1

Firstly, I am assuming that the motivation of your question is to install packages, so correct me if I'm wrong. To run commands a root, you can either execute the commands as the root user, or you can append sudo to the beginning of the command. For most applications, using sudo is safer that being root because, among other things, it will force you to ...


-1

if you simply want to change owner of a file you can use chown command as here it is told the usage is simply sudo chmod root filename


1

First, create the file, using the editor of your choice. Store it in a user directory, something in or under $HOME Check it to be sure it says what you think it says, and does what you want. Then, and only then: sudo cp yourfile /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/50-mouse-acceleration.conf


0

Become root before creating the file or run the editor you're going to use to create the file as root. For example: sudo -i gedit /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/50-mouse-acceleration.conf #paste in the file content, save it, you're done.


0

Yes it is possible, but not recommended. The username root is not magical. The fact that it has a UID of 0 is what gives root its power. Tools like /bin/ls that translate between the UID value in a file's inode and a name (unless you /bin/ls -n) use the password database (See man nss;man nsswitch.conf) to do the translation. The getent command fetches ...


0

No, it is not possible. In Windows, you can have guests and admins. In Ubuntu, there are guests, admins and the root. And nobody can actually BE the root, only use root powers. So no, there is no way to change the root's name.


0

Rather than trying to fix it, consider creating a second user with sudo privileges. Hopefully this is straighforward to do via the unity ui, since I only know how to do it by editing /etc/sudoers. That way, "guest" remains unpriviliged like it's supposed to be, and you can make the second user as secure or insecure as you like.


0

It is every easy to do administrative tasks from a guest session. You don't need to log into a console. You can get a GUI terminal and enjoy copy pasting commands from the browser. The su is disabled, but they cannot disable ssh. All you have to do is ssh into an account in the sudoers list on localhost: ssh <username>@localhost where ...


2

First. Be careful editing files owned by root. You could break your system. In terminal type gksu gedit /path/to/file You will be prompted for your password, enter it. Gedit will open and you will now be able to edit the file as root. If gksu isn't installd do so by typing in terminal: sudo apt-get install gksu After the installation is complete type in ...


0

Although I might be late here, please install the following if your phone is rooted: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1687590 There is a paid version of the above on play store https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=eu.chainfire.adbd


1

you can`t do this on a mounted partition, so you will need a live CD/USB. you can get it here, then burn it to CD/USB and boot from it. after you can use GParted tool included in live version of ubuntu and resize any needed partitions. p.s. if ubuntu live will automatically mount partitions you want to resize you can unmount them via "right click" - ...


1

by issuing this command you can see old kernels: dpkg -l 'linux-' | sed '/^ii/!d;/'"$(uname -r | sed "s/(.)-([^0-9]+)/\1/")"'/d;s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* ([^ ])./\1/;/[0-9]/!d' you can also check version you use by: uname -a and then remove obsolete updates by: sudo apt-get -y purge [here goes name of kernel you got with dpkg]


0

from the box I don't think there should be a password. Otherwise it is whatever you set as a screen unlock code or phrase. Good luck!


1

The root user is not enabled but you can become root without setting a password for it. Just type sudo su in the terminal and give it the password of the phablet user when it asks for one. //EDIT: I've tested this with developer mode enabled, where the phablet user's pass is the one used for the lockscreen, though in theory the command above should ...



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