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7

Add a shortcut to your launcher. I would not change the main command of the gedit launcher. Do the following: Never edit the default launcher, first copy the one from /usr/share/applications to ~/.local/share/applications: cp /usr/share/applications/gedit.desktop ~/.local/share/applications/gedit.desktop Edit the file with... gedit (not with gksudo) ...


6

PermitRootLogin is an sshd (the daemon) setting, not an ssh (the client) setting. It should go into /etc/ssh/sshd_config, where I'm reasonably certain you'll find a PermitRootLogin line.


5

sudo allows user to act as root without root login, it is more secure to use sudo instead of logging in as root. Advantages and Disadvantages Benefits of using sudo There are a number of benefits to Ubuntu leaving root logins disabled by default, including: The installer has fewer questions to ask. Users don't have to remember an extra password for ...


2

The question has nothing related to difference between sudo and su. The man page of cmp reads: The cmp utility compares two files of any type and writes the results to the standard output. By default, cmp is silent if the files are the same; if they differ, the byte and line number at which the first difference occurred is reported. So no output ...


2

The Setuid bit is not set. If it were, the permissions would have an s instead of the first x: $ ls -l /usr/bin/sudo -rwsr-xr-x 1 root root 155008 Feb 11 2014 /usr/bin/sudo Try using pkexec to set it correctly: pkexec chmod a=rx,u+ws /usr/bin/sudo Though I doubt that's the only problem you are going to have.


2

You can use the passwd command: # passwd -S root P 11/04/2014 -1 -1 -1 -1 # passwd -l root passwd: password expiry information changed. # passwd -S root L 11/04/2014 -1 -1 -1 -1 # passwd -d root passwd: password expiry information changed. # passwd -S root NP 11/04/2014 -1 -1 -1 -1 From man 1 passwd: -S, --status Display account status ...


1

the "vagrant" user will not have permissions to do anything in /root because it will have 0700 perms. Therefore anything in /root or in any subdirectory under /root etc will not be accessible by any use other than root. Prefix it with sudo and it should work. This is the correct setup and I strongly recommend that you leave /root's perms as 0700. Don't ...


1

One possibility is to look into /etc/passwd by entering grep root /etc/passwd It should show a line starting like root:x: ...... where the x indicates that encrypted passwords are stored in the shadow file. If this is the case, we look into it by running sudo grep root /etc/shadow (shadow file needs sudo to be opened!) You should get a line beginning ...


1

The way you added authorised keys, you haven't added your user's key to root's authorised keys. You have added your own key to your authorised keys and root's key to root's authorised keys. Instead do: sudo tee -a /root/.ssh/authorized_keys < ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub


1

If you try to open it from Nautilus file manager, root is labeled as a Computer in Places sidebar. Or, in Terminal you can use a cd command to change directory: cd / "/" is a root directory on Linux.



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