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6

What is "root"? root is a user existing on every Linux system. To be more precise, it is a special user - the super user! root is the only user that has privileges to do everything. In contrast to the two types of user accounts you can create (administrator users and restricted users), it exists by default and can neither be renamed or deleted. Usually, ...


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The answer is right there in the lsattr output: # lsattr .. ----i--------e-- ../web2 The folder is immutable, even by root.


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I somehow managed to solve my problem and get gedit back to work, even for root. What I did was sudo apt-get install --reinstall dbus dbus-x11 to reinstall some dbus-packages which I probably messed up some time ago by running make uninstall on a package containing dbus parts. dconf dump /org/gnome/gedit/ > /home/bytecommander/dconf-gedit.dump ...


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Is it bad to have at all times (one) terminal logged in as root? If so, why? Yes. Well. The idea of logging out your root terminal is due to the fact that Linux is a multi-user system. So other users could walk to your terminal and issue commands you do not want them to issue. With the introduction of desktops (that are often single user) this is less ...


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Is it bad to have at all times (one) terminal logged in as root? If so, why? I can only say that I worked the same way as you, until I made a huge mistake... most of the time I forgot to add sudo in front of my commands to get the privilege for systemuser. Then on one day I executed as root the command rm -rf / var/www/filenotneeded.html ... as you ...


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Alright, first of all, that's not how you become root in ubuntu. To become root, you can either use the sudo command to execute root, or you can use sudo passwd which is how to set the password for the root account on ubuntu. Then, to become root, you use su and enter the password you set previously. Did you edit anything in the fstab document?


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A dirty workaround would be to set your account to not prompt for sudo passwords, but that is not recommended for security purposes. if you type "sudo visudo" you should be able to add an entry for your user that looks like this: # User privilege specification root ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL username ALL=NOPASSWD: ALL This may or may not work for the ...


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root is the user name or account that by default has access to all commands and files on a Linux or other Unix-like operating system. It is also referred to as the root account, root user and the superuser. So there will arise certain cases when you will have to be logged in as root user to run those commands. Do not worry it is simple. By default, the ...


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if you look carefully at the getfacl output at the top of your post you'll see this: # owner: root # group: root user::rwx group::r-x other::r-x As you can see, the user root has write access but the group root does not. kchinnam post here has a good explanation as to why this is a problem and the same thread also describes how to use setfacl to allow a ...


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Boot a live system (for example boot from a usb stick). Resize sda2 all the way to the right. Move sda5 all the way to the right inside sda2. Resize sda2 from the left to the right. Resize sda1 all the way to the beginning of sda2. Apply after each single step in this case. Changing size on the right hand side will go fast, changing size on the left hand ...


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Updated answer. Since I wrote the following I've noticed that according to the screenshot, your swapspace is not in use. If it were in use it would show as mounted. Since it is not being used (cannot be benefited from) you may as well first delete the swapspace (sda5) and then the extended partition. This will free up still more space and make the task ...



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