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6

In Ubuntu 12.04 and later, /etc/resolv.conf is dynamically generated by the resolvconf utility. (Actually, resolvconf generates /run/resolvconf/resolv.conf and /etc/resolv.conf is a symbolic link to that. That's the default configuration; it is also possible to run with a static file at /etc/resolv.conf but that is non-standard.) Nameserver information ...


4

This was on Ubuntu server 12.04 LTS and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Thanks all for the help. Turns out to be a result of a difference in the way host and the glibc resolver read /etc/resolv.conf. I was managing resolv.conf with a puppet module that edited the appropriate files in /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/. Said puppet module resulted in an /etc/resolv.conf ...


4

I think it would be beneficial to step back, teach a man how to fish instead of just telling you what's wrong. There are many components involved in making a good network connection It can be the hardware: ethernet card, cable contacts, network interface on your directly connected switch, etc. It can be the low level software: the kernel driver for your ...


2

The resolvconf records have names that follow the pattern IFACE.CONFIGURER So to force eth1* records to come before other eth* records you need to replace eth* with eth1* eth* After making this change, do sudo resolvconf -u


2

Resolvconf generates /etc/resolv.conf using files in /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/ in the order: head, base, tail. The head file is almost always present and contains just the warning message about generated files. The base file may also be present, but is empty by default. There might be a tail file, and this is likely the culprit in your case given that ...


2

OK, I found a solution here which is to run sudo dpkg-reconfigure resolvconf In the interaction with dpkg-reconfigure, I answered YES to the first question and NO to the second one. This bug report may be relevant to the problem I had.


2

To undo the damage, do sudo rm -f /etc/resolv.conf sudo dpkg-reconfigure resolvconf


1

As you quote it, your dhclient.conf lacks a terminating semicolon after each supersede statement.


1

There can be only three nameservers in resolv.conf. If you remove one of the IPv4 nameservers the second IPv6 nameserver will be added.


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Found it! Since a Ubuntu server autoconfigure itself via DHCP on installation it creates the file /run/resolvconf/interface/eth0.dhclient with the information about the wth.local domain : domain wth.local nameserver 172.31.0.5 Configuring a static IP won't delete the file and when you restart the network with the following command : ~$ sudo ifdown eth0 ...


1

One of the problems is that resolvconf did not get configured properly. Ref: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/resolvconf/+bug/1000244. To fix this, run sudo dpkg-reconfigure resolvconf This, however, can't be the reason that you cannot ping other machines by IP address.


1

It happens because the search feature supersedes the domain feature. Unlike domain, search accepts multiple arguments. Consider domain to be obsolete.



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